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The Cradle Song Monologue

The Cradle Song Monologue by Gregorio Martinez Sierra
Character: Teresa
Gender: Female
Age (range): ?
Style: Drama
Length: 3 minutes

 

TERESA: Do you know how I would like to spend my life? All of it? Sitting on the ground at his feet, looking up into his eyes, just listening to him talk. You don't know how he can talk. He knows everything--everything that there is to know in the world, and he tells you such things! The things that you always have known yourself, in your heart, and you couldn't find out how to say them. Even when he doesn't say anything, if he should be speaking some language which you didn't understand, it is wonderful . . . his voice . . . I don't know how to explain it, but it is his voice--a voice that seems as if it had been talking to you ever since the day you were born! You don't hear it only with your ears, but with your whole body. It's like the air which you see and breathe and taste, and which smells so sweetly in the garden beneath the tree of paradise. Ah, Mother! The first day that he said to me "Teresa"--you see what a simple thing it was, my name, Teresa--why, it seemed to me as if nobody ever had called me by my name before, as if I never had heard it, and when he went away, I ran up and down the street saying to myself "Teresa, Teresa, Teresa!" under my breath, without knowing what I was doing, as if I walked on air! You mustn't be angry with me, Mother. Look at me! It isn't wrong, I know. Loving him, I . . . he is so good, so good . . . and good, it cannot pass away! One day he said to me: "I love you because you know how to pray." Don't you see? And another time: "I feel a devotion toward you as toward some holy thing." He! Devotion! To me! And whenever I think of that, it seems to me as if I was just growing better, as if all at once I was capable of everything there was to do or suffer in the world--so as to always have him feel that way!

Credits: Reprinted from The Cradle Song. Trans. John Garrett Underhill. Boston: Poet Lore Co., 1917.