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Field Of Dreams Movie Script

Writer(s) : Phil Alden Robinson

Genres : Drama, Family, Fantasy

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                             FIELD OF DREAMS


                         
                               Written by

                          Phil Alden Robinson



                                                  March 9, 1988

                                         FINAL DRAFT SCREENPLAY

                         

                         1

                         FADE IN

          MONTAGE OF PHOTOS

          RAY (V.O.)
          My father's name was John Kinsella.
          A faded, sepia shot of a dirty little kid on a farm.

          RAY (V.O.)
          It's an Irish name. He was born in
          North Dakota, in 1896...
          Young man in doughboy uniform.

          RAY (V.O.)
          ...and never saw a big city until he
          came back from France in 1918.
          Chicago. Tenement. Comiskey Park. Ballgames.

          RAY (V.O.)
          He settled in Chicago, where he quickly
          learned to live and die with the White
          Sox. Died a little when they lost the
          1919 World Series...
          Newspaper headlines. Photo of Shoeless Joe Jackson.

          RAY (V.O.)
          ...died a lot the following summer when
          eight members of the team were accused
          of throwing that Series.
          Dad (a catcher) playing ball. At work. Weeding.

          RAY (V.O.)
          He played in the minors for a year or
          two, but nothing ever came of it. Moved
          to Brooklyn in '35, married Mom in '38,
          and was already an old man working at
          the Naval Yards when I was born in 1949.
          Ray as an infant. With his father. In front of Ebbets Field
          in miniature Dodger uniform, etc.

          RAY (V.O.)
          My name's Ray Kinsella. Mom died when
          I was three, and I suppose Dad did the
          best he could. Instead of Mother Goose,
          I was put to bed at night to stories of

                         (MORE)

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         2

                         1 CONTINUED

                          RAY (CONT'D)
          Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig...and the great
          Shoeless Joe Jackson. Dad was a Yankees
          fan then, so of course I rooted for
          Brooklyn. But in '58 the Dodgers moved
          away, so we had to find other things to
          fight about. We did. And when it came
          time to go to college, I picked the
          farthest one from home I could find.
          Berkeley in the 1960s: hippies, protesters, etc.

          RAY (V.0.)
          This, of course, drove him right up the
          wail, which I suppose was the point.
          Officially my major was English, but
          really it was the Sixties.
          Ray looking foolish in long hair and tie-dye.

          RAY (V.O.)
          I marched, I smoked some grass, I tried
          to like sitar music... and I met Annie.
          Annie: blue jeans, T-shirt, freckles. Their courtship.

          RAY (V.0.)
          The only thing we had in common was that
          she came from Iowa and I had once heard
          of Iowa. We moved in together. After
          graduation, we moved to the Midwest, and
          stayed with her family as long as we
          could.
          Unsmiling American Gothic types.

          RAY (V.O.)
          Almost a full afternoon.
          The apartment, Ray at different jobs, the wedding.

          RAY (V.0.)
          We rented an apartment and I took a job
          selling insurance. I also drove a cab
          and worked in a pizza parlor. Dad died
          in June of 1 74. Annie and I got married
          that fail.
          Baby pictures.

          RAY (V.O.)
          A few years later Karin was born. She
          smelled weird, but we loved her anyway.
          Then Annie got the crazy idea that she
          could talk me into buying a farm.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         3

                         1 CONTINUED (2)

                         1
          Ray, Annie, and four-year-old Karin by the "SOLD" sign of
          their farm. Ray in a cornfield.

          RAY (V.0.)
          I'm thirty-eight years old and I'm about
          to become a farmer. I love my family,
          I love baseball, and I miss New York.
          Moving in on Ray's face.

          RAY (V.0.)
          But until I heard The Voice...I'd never
          done a crazy thing in my whole life.

                         DISSOLVE TO

          2 THE CORNFIELD - DUSK

                         2
          It is dusk on a spring evening. The sky is a robin's-egg
          blue, and the wind is soft as a day-old chick. Ray
          Kinsella is working in the cornfield when a voice -- like
          that of a public address announcer -- speaks to him.

                         THE VOICE
          'If you build it, he will come.'
          Ray looks up and around, but sees nothing that could be the
          source of this sound. All around him are empty fields.
          He stands quietly for a few moments, then goes back to
          work.

                         THE VOICE
          'If you build it, he will come.'
          Ray jerks his head in all directions to see where this
          voice is coming from, but again, he sees nothing unusual
          -- just the furrowed fields and a few hundred feet away,
          the massive old farmhouse with a sagging veranda on three
          sides. On the north veranda is a wooden porch swing where
          Annie and Karin sit, sipping lemonade and dreaming.

                         RAY

                         (CALLS)
          Annie, what was that?

                         ANNIE

                         (CALLS BACK)
          What was what?

                         RAY
          That voice.

                         ANNIE
          What voice?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         4

                         2 CONTINUED

                         2

                         RAY
          Just now. Like an announcement.
          Annie confers briefly with Karin, then calls back to Ray.

                         ANNIE
          We didn't hear anything.

                         RAY
          Oh.
          Ray thinks for a second, then shakes it off, trying to
          dislodge that thought from his mind, and gets back to work.

                         THE VOICE
          'If you build it, he will come.'
          Again, he bolts upright and looks around. Again, he sees
          nothing. This is beginning to bug him. He calls:

                         RAY
          Okay, you must've heard that.

          3 ON THE PORCH

                         3
          Annie and Karin lock at each other and exchange a shrug.
          Annie extends her arms palms upward, and calls to Ray.

                         ANNIE
          Sorry. Come on. Dinner.
          Annie leads Karin inside.

          4 -IN THE FIELD

                         4
          Ray looks all around him with an "Okay, fellas, what's the
          joke?" look on his face. But there is no one there. He
          puts down his tools and walks toward the house.

          5 INT. KITCHEN

          Ray enters, looks at his wife skeptically and joins his
          wife and daughter setting the table.

                         RAY
          Was there like a sound truck on the
          highway, or something?

                         ANNIE
          Nape.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         5

                         5 CONTINUED

                         5

                         RAY
          Kids with a radio?

                         ANNIE
          Nope. You really hearing voices?

                         RAY
          Just one.

                         ANNIE
          Ah. God?

                         RAY
          More like a. . .ballpark announcer.
          Annie shoots him an "Are you kidding?" look. Ray responds
          with a shrug. They sit down to eat.

                         ANNIE
          What'd it say?

                         RAY
          'If you build. it, he will come.'

                         ANNIE
          If you build what, who will come?

                         RAY

                         (SHRUGS)
          He didn't say.

                         ANNIE
          Ooh, I hate it when that happens.

                         RAY
          Me too.

                          CUT TO

          6 RAY AND ANNIE'S BEDROOM - NIGHT

                         6
          They are snuggled together, asleep. All is quiet. Then:

                         THE VOICE
          'If you build it, he will come.'
          Ray's eyes pop open. He looks at Annie, who does not stir.
          Without moving, he looks around the room. There is no one
          there. Very quietly, he crosses to the window and looks
          out. He whispers out toward the cornfield:

                         RAY
          Build what? For who?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         6

                         6 CONTINUED 6
          Behind him, Annie stirs.

                         ANNIE
          Ray?

                         RAY
          It's okay, honey, I'm just-talking to
          the cornfield.
          He sighs and goes back to bed. Annie cuddles up to him.
          Her eyes are closed, but Ray's eyes remain open. He is
          puzzled and concerned.

                         CUT TO

                         7 TELEVISION SCREEN
           A scene from the 1950 movie Harvey, in which James Stewart
          insists he is conversing with an invisible rabbit.

          8 RAY AND ANNIE'S KITCHEN MORNING

                         L
          ittle Karin is watching Harvey while she eats her
          breakfast. Ray enters, looking like he had very little
          sleep, and promptly turns the TV set off.

                         KARIN
          Why'd you do that? It was funny.

                         RAY
          Trust me, Karin, it's not funny. The
          man is sick. He's very sick.
          Annie enters, putting on her coat.

                         ANNIE
          Karin, if you're finished, get your coat
          and school bag. Let's go.
          Karin bolts from the table.

                         RAY
          Uh honey, I'll take her today. I'v-e got
          some errands in town.

                         ANNIE
          Far out.
          She takes off her coat and kisses Ray as he takes-the car
          keys and heads outside. Annie sits at the kitchen table.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         7

                         CONTINUED

                         8

                         ANNIE
          What if the voice calls while you're
          gone?

                         RAY
          Take a message.

                         ANNIE
          Right.
          He exits. She grins, turns on the TV and watches Harvey.

                         CUT TO

          9 EXT. IOWA CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL - DAY 9

          Ray's car pulls up, Karin runs out and Ray drives off.

                         CUT TO

          10 INT. DOCTOR'S OFFICE - DAY 10

          Ray is plugged into some weird-looking contraption, having
          his hearing examined. Then the Doctor shines a penlight
          into his eyes, shrugs, and starts putting his gear away.

                         DOCTOR
          Well, I can't find anything wrong. I
          could recommend a shrink, but hey,
          people hear things all the time. I
          heard a voice once. I was still living
          with my parents, 'then. They worked in
          the circus, so I was raised in the
          circus, and I was training to be a
          clown. This one day, I'm putting on my
          little red nose and I hear a voice,
          tells me to go to medical school. Here
          I am.
          Ray is not sure if he should ignore this or run.

                         CUT TO

          11 FARM SUPPLY STORE - DAY 11
          Farmers are loading up with seed, fertilizer, and other
          farmer stuff. This is the kind of place where people also
          linger to exchange gossip, swap lies, and pass the time.
          Ray is off to one side, chewing the fat with an old-timer.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         8

                         11 CONTINUED 11

                         RAY
          In all those years, did you ever...

                         (SEARCHES)
          I've heard that sometimes farmers out
          in the field...hear things. Voices.

                         OLD-TIMER
          You hearing voices?

                         RAY

                         (QUICKLY)
          No. It's just that I heard some farmers
          do, and... I, of course, don't, so I was
          wondering if I was doing something
          wrong, or something. Did you ever hear
          voices out there?

                         CASHIER
          (calls from her

                         CASH REGISTER)
          Who's hearing voices?

                         OLD-TIMER
          Ray is. Out in the fields.
          Now, everyone in the store turns to look at Ray.

                         RAY
          No! No, I'm not. Really.
          But the people still stare. Ray addresses them.

                         RAY
          Noises! That darn tractor, it's...
          (forces a nervous

                         LAUGH)
          Well, I'll just get some 3-in-1 oil,
          that should...

                         (TO THE

                         OLD-TIMER)
          Nice talking to you.

                         CUT TO

          12 RAY'S FARM - DAY 12
          Ray is out in the fields again, hard at work. A breeze
          picks up. He stops fora moment, cocks an ear and looks
          around. All he sees are the empty fields. Insects make
          the only sounds. He goes back to work. Then:

                         THE VOICE
          'If you build it, he will come.'

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         9

                         12 CONTINUED 12
          He throws his tools down angrily and looks all around, but
          there is no apparent source of the voice. Ray is pissed.

                         RAY
          All right, who are you, and what the
          hell do you want from me?!?
          All he hears is a faraway echo.

                         THE VOICE
          'If you build it, he will come.'
          This is serious. Ray shakes his head and repeats the words
          to himself.

                         RAY
          If you build it...
          As he thinks about these words,,some unexplained impulse
          causes Ray to turn his head deliberately toward a portion
          of the cornfield between him and the house.

                         FLASH CUT

                         1

          13 A BASEBALL FIELD L3
          For the briefest of moments, the dreamlike image of a
          baseball field at night, illuminated by floodlights, flares
          in over the lawn. Standing on the edge of the field, is
          the figure of a man with his back to us. Before we can see
          anything else, the image disappears.

                         14 RAY 14
          Ray's eyes widen.

                         RAY
          . he will come'.

                         FLASH CUT
          i5 THE MAN AND THE FIELD 1 5
          The dream image flares in again, this time closer to the
          man. He stands in the middle distance, silhouetted by the
          lights, and we see he is wearing a uniform of some kind.
          He starts to turn slowly towards us, but before we can see
          his face, the image disappears.

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         10

          16 CLOSE ON RAY

                         16
          Ray's mouth opens. He half-laughs, as if to say "This
          can't be." But whatever is in his mind won't go away.

                         RAY
          .he will come.

                         FLASH CUT

                         17 THE MAN

                         17
          Now we see him in head-and-shoulders. He has the muscular
          neck of an athlete. As he slowly turns we start to see a
          bit of his weathered face before the image flares out.

                         18 RAY

                         18
          Wheels are turning inside his head. He is trying to figure
          all this out. In the distance, a bell is ringing. He
          looks O.S.

          19 EXT. HOUSE - DUSK


                         19
          Annie is on the veranda ringing the dinner bell hanging by
          the front door.

                         ANNIE
          Yo, Ray! Food!

          20 HER POINT OF VIEW - THE FIELDS 20
          We see Ray emerge slowly from the fields, the twilit sky
          changing colors behind him.

                         21 THE VERANDA

                         21
          Annie leans against a post, lazily watching Ray approach.
          She likes how he moves, and how he looks.

                         ANNIE
          Hiya, cutie.
          Ray climbs up the steps, accepts her kiss, and instead of
          following her into the house, pulls her down with him onto
          the swing. He takes-her hand and looks into her eyes.

                         RAY
          Annie...

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         11

                         21 CONTINUED

                         21

                         ANNIE

                         (PLAYING ALONG)
          Ray...

                         RAY
          You're not going to believe this...

                         ANNIE
          You heard the voice again.

                         RAY
          Wait, this gets better, I just saw a
          vision.

                         ANNIE
          Get out of here!

                         RAY
          I swear to God. An actual vision.

                         ANNIE
          We're going to have to burn you at the
          stake if this keeps up.

                         RAY
          I know.

                         CUT TO

          22 INT. HOUSE - NIGHT


                         22

                         THE
          family is eating dinner. Ray seems lostin thought.

                         ANNIE
          Hey, you don't suppose this could be
          like an acid flashback, do you?

                         RAY
          I never took acid.

                         ANNIE
          Maybe you will someday, and it's a flash
          forward.

                         RAY
          Annie, there's more.

                         ANNIE
          You're subscribing to the Enquirer.

                         RAY
          I think I know what 'If you build it,
          he will come' means.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         12

                         22 CONTINUED

                         22

                         ANNIE
          Oooh, why do I not think this is a good
          thing?

                         RAY
          I think it means if I build a baseball
          field out there, Shoeless Joe Jackson
          will get to come back and play ball
          again.

                         ANNIE
          You're kidding.

                         RAY
          Uh uh.
          She whistles. This is serious.

                         RAY
          Yeah.

                         CUT TO

          23 INT. KARIN'S BEDROOM - NIGHT


                         23
          Ray and Annie are putting little Karin to bed.

                         ANNIE
          Boy, I thought my family was crazy, but
          this...this is the craziest thing I've
          ever heard.

                         RAY
          I know. It's totally nuts.

                         ANNIE
          I mean, Shoeless Joe, he's...

                         RAY

                         (NODS)
          Died in '51.

                         ANNIE
          And he's the one they suspended, right?

                         -AY
          Right.

                         ANNIE
          He still dead?

                         RAY
          Far as I know.

                         CUT TO

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         13

          24 INT.'BATHROOM - NIGHT


                         24
          Ray and Annie in their pajamas, brushing their teeth,
          getting ready for bed.

                         ANNIE
          You know what amazes me? No one could
          ever get you to believe in astrology,
          or ESP, or reincarnation, or heaven, or
          any of that stuff. But this...I think
          this shows real personal growth, Ray.

                         RAY
          Thank you.
          Annie smiles, but sees that Ray is troubled. She hugs him.

                         ANNIE
          Oh, sweetie. I hope you know that even
          though I make jokes, I'm going to visit
          you every month wherever they put you.
          He offers her a weak smile and exits.

                         CUT TO

          25 INT. RAY AND'ANNIE'S BEDROOM - NIGHT

          It is dark. For a few seconds it is quiet. Then:

                         RAY
          Did you know Babe Ruth copied his swing?

                         ANNIE
          If I did, I'd forgotten it.
          Ray sits up in the dark.

                         RAY
          I always felt cheated I never got to see
          him play. He was supposed to be so
          graceful, and agile. So to actually get
          to see him play again...to let him play
          again, to right an old wrong...
          He shakes his head in wonder just to think of it. Annie
          turns on the light.

                         ANNIE
          Wait a minute, Bosco. Are you actually
          thinking of doing this?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         14

                         25 CONTINUED

                          25

                          RAY
           No.

                         (THEN)
          I mean, I can't think of one good reason
          why I should,-but...
          (takes a breath)
          I'm thirty-eight years old, I have a
          wife, a child, and a mortgage, and I'm
          scared to death I'm turning into my
          father.

                         ANNIE
          What's your father got to do with this?
          Ray tries to picture his father in his mind. He speaks
          softly, but the words obviously have a great deal of
          meaning for him.

                         RAY
          I never forgave him for getting old.
          By the time he'was as old as I am now,
          he was ancient. He must have had
          dreams, but he never did anything about
          them. For all I know, he may have even
          heard voices, too, but he sure didn't
          listen to them. The man never did one
          spontaneous thing in all the years I
          knew him. Annie, I'm scared that that's
          what growing up means. I'm afraid of
          that happening to me. And something
          tells me this may be my last chance to
          do something about it.
          (looks at her)
          I want to build that field. Do you
          think I'm crazy?
          She looks at him with great understanding.

                         ANNIE
          Yes.
          He smiles wanly. She touches his face lovingly.

                         ANNIE
          I also think that if you feel you really
          have to do this... then you should do it.
          They hold each other's gaze, and Ray cannot remember when
          he has loved her so much. He takes her in his arms.
          Outside their window, the field of corn lies waiting.

                         CUT TO

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         15

          26 THE CORNFIELD - DAY

                         26
          Stalks of corn wave slowly in the breeze. A bee buzzes
          near one. The light is yellow. Suddenly, the stalks bend
          violently to the ground as Ray's tractor plows them under.

          27 ON THE TRACTOR 27
          Ray drives, Karin rides shotgun, holding the large detailed
          diagram Ray has drawn of the ballpark's dimensions.

                         RAY
          Ty Cobb called him the greatest left
          fielder of all time. His glove was
          called 'the place where triples go to
          die.'

                         28 HIGH ANGLE 28
           The tractor turns to plow under more corn, and we can see
           the size of the area Ray has staked off with marker sticks.

           KARIN (V.0.)
           Could he hit?

           RAY (V.O.)
           Lifetime 356 average. Third highest
          in history.
          Karin whistles.

                         29 ANOTHER ANGLE 29
          By the side of the road, an old man and woman stand and
          watch these neighbors-plow under their. corn. They look at
          each other as if to say "Could it be Communists?"

          KARIN (V.0.)
          Why'd they called him Shoeless Joe?

          30 SEEDING THE FIELD - DAY 30
          It is days later, an area the size of a baseball field has
          been plowed under, and Ray is seeding it.

          RAY (V.O.)
          When he was still in the minors, he
          bought a new pair of spikes and they
          hurt his feet. About the sixth inning
          he took them off and played the outfield
          in just his socks. The other players
          kidded him, called him Shoeless Joe, and
          the name stuck.

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         16

          31 WATERING THE GRASS - NIGHT- 31
          We can see roughly where the grass has been planted, and
          where the dirt will be smoothed out for the base paths.
          Ray stands stock-still in the moonlight, water hose in
          hand, patiently misting the baby grass, little Karin at his
          side.

          RAY (V.0.)
          Then in 1919, his team, the Chicago
          White Sox, threw the World Series.

          KARIN (V.0.)
          What's 'threw'?

          RAY (V.0.)
          They lost it on purpose. Gamblers paid
          them to.

          32 SIDE OF THE ROAD

                         32
          Now, dozens of families stand to watch silent and
          dumb-eyed, at what has obviously become a daily spectacle
          among the townspeople. Some snap photos.

          RAY (V.0.)
          Except Shoeless Joe.

          33 SMOOTHING OUT THE FIELD - DAY
          Ray smooths out the base paths with a large roller, as
          Annie and Karin follow behind with rakes. On either side
          of the base paths, the infield and outfield grass is
          growing.

          RAY (V.0.)
          Nobody could prove anything one way or
          another, but he was the one guy who
          probably wasn't in on it.

          34 INT. HARDWARE STORE - DAY


                         34
          Ray, Annie and Karin wait as the cashier totals up their
          load of lumber and hardware.

                         RAY
          I mean if he was supposed to be throwing
          it, how do you explain the fact he hit
          375 for the series and didn't commit
          one error? Huh?

                         KARIN
          I can't.

                          CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         17

          34 CONTINUED 34,

                         RAY
          Twelve hits, including the series' only
          home run. And they said he was trying
          to lose!

                         KARIN
          It's ridiculous.

                         CASHIER
          That's 855 dollars, sixty-four cents.
          From O.S., we hear oooh. Ray turns and notices for the
          first time that a crowd of spectators -- employees and
          customers -- has been watching him and whispering among
          themselves. They look at him as if he had two heads.
          Ray turns his attention back to writing a check for his
          purchases. He deadpans to Annie:

                         RAY
          We'd better notify Mars to send us more
          money.

                         ANNIE

                         (EQUALLY DEADPAN)
          Remlak won't like that.

                         RAY
          That's his problem. And tell him to
          make it in Earth dollars this time.
          Ray hands over the check to the open-mouthed cashier.

                         RAY
          Thank you. Have a nice day.
          Ray and Annie turn and leave with Karin. The farmers
          watch, obviously trying hard to figure this one out.

                         CUT TO

          35 BUILDING THE OUTFIELD WALL - DAY 35
          Ray hammers the braces that will support the outfield wall.
          Karin hands him nails from a bag she wears around her neck.

          RAY (V.O.)
          There's a famous story about when he
          came out of the courtroom, a kid ran up
          to him, tugged his sleeve and said 'Say
          it ain't so, Joe.' And Jackson looked
          down t him and said 'I'm afraid it is,
          kid.'

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         18

                         35 CONTINUED 35

                         KARIN
          Then what happened?

          36 BUILDING THE BLEACHERS 36
          Annie helps Ray lift a board to what will be the top row.

                         RAY
          The Commissioner of Baseball suspended
          eight of the players -- including the
          great Shoeless Joe Jackson -- for life.

                         KARIN
          What's suspend?

                         RAY
          They never let him play the game again.
          They continue to work in silence.

                         CUT TO

          37 INT. SPORTING GOODS STORE I 7

          Ray writes a check for his purchases: bats, balls, bases
          pitcher's rubber, home plate, etc. He appears slightly
          annoyed that once again, he is being stared at by all the
          uniformed employees of the store. He turns to catch the
          Store Owner staring at him the most intently.

                         RAY
          What. What!

                         STORE OWNER
          You're the fella that plowed under your
          corn and built a baseball diamond,
          right?

                         RAY
          Yeah. What about it?

                         STORE OWNER
          (shakes his hand)
          Greatest damn thing I ever heard.
          The other employees beam their agreement.

                         RAY
          At these prices, I'm not surprised.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         19

                         37 CONTINUED
          He wheels his shopping cart of sporting goods out through
          a gauntlet of approving salesmen. They smile and pat him
          on the back. Ray cannot decide if they're crazier than he
          is.

                         RAY
          Thank you...thank you...

                         CUT TO

          38 THE LIGHT STANDARD - NIGHT 38
          Atop the aluminum-painted poles, an array of store-bought
          floodlights switch on, flaring against the blue-black sky.
          In this sharp white light the grass glows parrot green,
          cool as mint, soft as a cashmere blanket. Annie and Karin
          watch as Ray puts down the clean white bases, which pick
          up the light like little moons on a cold, clear night.

                         RAY
          My father said he saw him years later
          playing under a made-up name in some
          tenth-rate league in Carolina. He'd put
          on fifty pounds, and the spring was gone
          from his step, but he could still hit.
          Dad used to say no one could hit like
          Shoeless Joe.
          Ray is smiling wistfully.

                         ANNIE
          That's the first time I've ever seen you
          smile as you mentioned your father.
          Ray considers that.

                         KARIN
          How come?

                         ANNIE
          Come on, you. Bed time.
          Annie hoists Karin on her shoulders with a grunt, and the
          three climb their way down the bleachers. Ray's hand
          steadies Annie as she takes one of the steps.

                         RAY
          Careful...
          Moonl ight butters the Iowa night. They walk along the side
          of the field, and Ray stops. He looks at the field.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         20

                         38 CONTINUED 38

                         RAY
          I have just created something totally
          illogical.

                         ANNIE
          That's what I like about it.

                         RAY
          Am I completely nuts?

                         ANNIE
          Not completely.
          She looks out over the baseball field.

                         ANNIE
          It's a good baseball field, Ray.

                         RAY
          It is kinda pretty, isn't it?
          Annie smiles at him and carries Karin inside. Ray steps
          onto the porch and flicks the switch shutting off the
          floodlights over the field.

                         CUT TO

          39 RAY AND ANNIE'S BEDROOM - NIGHT 39
          Annie opens her eyes and sees Ray not beside her in bed,
          but in th window seat, looking out at the empty field.
          Barely awake, she gets out of bed, shuffles to his side and
          curls up against him.

                         ANNIE
          Any sign?

                         RAY
          Something's going to happen out there.
          I can feel it.
          Annie lowers her head against his chest and goes back to
          sleep. Outside, the trees are fully leafed.

                         DISSOLVE TO

          40 RAY'S BASEBALL FIELD - OCTOBER 40
          The trees are almost bare now, and there's a Halloween
          pumpkin in the front window of the house. The cornstalks

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         21

                         40 CONTINUED

                         40
          ,rustle like crumpling paper in the Indian-summer breeze
          which blows fallen leaves across the empty baseball field
          while Ray sits in the stands... waiting.

                         DISSOLVE TO

          41 THE BASEBALL FIELD - LATE DECEMBER 41
          it is covered with snow.

          42 INT. RAY AND ANNIE'S HOUSE 42

          Ray looks forlornly out the living room window towards his
          snow-covered baseball field, the merrily blinking lights
          of the Christmas tree behind him belying his true mood.

                         DISSOLVE TO

          43 SPRINGTIME - DAY
          A baby robin tries to pull a worm out of the around.
          Inside the house, Annie is doing spring cleaning. She
          looks out the window to see:

          44 THE BASEBALL FIELD
          Ray mowing the outfield grass. He stops, looks around,
          listens, hears nothing, and continues mowing.

                         45 ANNIE

                         45
          just watches him.

                         CUT TO

                         46 TV SCREEN 46
          We see the first exhibition game of spring training from
          Florida, as the announcer talks about a "southpaw" pitcher.

          47 INT. RAY AND ANNIE'S LIVING ROOM - NIGHT 47

          Little Karin watches the TV, while Annie and Ray sit at the
          living room table, financial ledgers spread out before them
          as they struggle with their accounts.

                         KARIN
          Daddy, what's a southpaw?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         22

                         47 CONTINUED

                         47

                         RAY
          A left-handed pitcher.

                         (TO ANNIE)
          How bad is it?

                         ANNIE
          Well, given how much less acreage we
          have for corn, I'd say we'll probably
          .almost break even.

                         RAY
          Jesus.

                         ANNIE
          We've spent all our savings on that
          field.

          KARIN (O.S.)
          Daddy..

                         RAY
          Just a minute, Karin.

                         (TO ANNIE)
          So what are you saying? We can't keep
          the field?

                         ANNIE

                         (SADLY)
          It makes it real hard to keep the farm,
          Ray.
          Ray closes his eyes.

          KARIN (O.S.)
          Daddy...

                         RAY
          (a little testy)
          In a minute, Karin.

          KARIN (O.S.)
          There's a man out there on your lawn.
          Ray opens his eyes and turns to see Karin kneeling on the
          kitchen counter, looking out the window. Ray and Annie
          exchange a quick glance, and Ray walks to the window.

          48 EXT. THE WINDOW


                         48
          seen from outside, as Ray's head appears and looks out.
          He sees something out there and just looks at it.

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         23

          49 RAY'S POINT OF VIEW

                          49
           There is a Man standing on the edge ofthebaseballfield.
          Hi es wearing a baseball uniform.
          Anold-fashionedone.

                         50 INT HOUSE

                         50
          Ray turns to Annie. She looks out and nods thoughtfully.
          Annie stays very calm in emergencies.

                         ANNIE
          We'll put up some coffee. You go ahead.
          Ray takes a breath and steps out onto the veranda. The
          night sky seems close enough to touch.

          51 EXT. HOUSE


                         51
          On the porch wall, Ray finds the switch, holds his breath,
          flicks it and the floodlights sputter to life.

                         52 THE MAN

                         52
          steps onto the field. On his uniform is a large "S" with
          an "O" in the top crook, an "X" in the bottom, and an
          American flag with forty-eight stars on his left sleeve.

                         53 RAY

                         53
          walks through the swirling ground mist toward the field.

          54 RAY'S POINT OF VIEW

                         54
          Moving closer to the field we see the Man standing out in
          left field. Feet spread wide, body bent forward from the
          waist, hands on hips, he waits.

                         55 RAY

                         55
          Ray's mouth is dry. He reaches home plate and picks up one
          of the bats lying beside the pail of hard balls. The back
          of his neck tingles. Then, he picks up one of the balls.

          56 IN THE OUTFIELD

                         56
          The Man spreads his feet, pounds his small, old-style
          glove, and waits to field the ball.

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         24

          57 AT HOME PLATE 57
          Ray tosses the ball a few feet into the air and swings at
          it. And misses. His face reddens, he clears his throat,
          and tries again. This time he connects.

                         58 THE FIELD 58
          He has hit a grounder that would be easily fielded by a
          shortstop had there been one, but it bounces through and
          falls into left field. The Man runs in for it, scoops it
          up cleanly and throws it back to the plate.
          Ray is thrilled. He hits another ground ball, and this
          too, is fielded cleanly. Then another, which the Man
          deftly short-hops. Ray hollers out to him.

                         RAY
          How's the field play?

                         THE MAN
          It's good. The ball bounces true.
          Ray smiles with pride. He tosses up another ball, gives
          it his best swing, and is thrilled to see he has actually
          lofted one into the air. But into center field. The Man
          sprints across the outfield, and makes a lovely catch in
          short center. Instead of throwing the ball in, the Man
          runs it in, loping toward home plate. Ray's heart thumps.

                         RAY
          Hi.
          The Man nods at him, takes the bat, and tests it to feel
          its weight.

                         RAY
          Ray Kinsella.

                         THE MAN
          Joe Jackson.
          Ray is thrilled to hear the words spoken. It is Shoeless
          Joe Jackson after all, who stands not five feet away from
          him, trying out all the bats now. Ray isn't quite sure if
          he should talk, or ask questions, or just stand there.
          Finally, he can't help himself.

                         RAY
          I bet its good to be playing again,
          huh?

                         SHOELESS JOE
          It was like having part of me amputated.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         25

                         58 CONTINUED
          Joe looks over at Ray, now, his dark eyes evincing the pain
          his steady voice tries to conceal.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          I've heard that old man wake up and
          scratch itchy legs that've been dust for
          fifty years. That was me. I'd wake up
          in the night with the smell of the
          ballpark in my nose and the cool of the
          grass on my feet. The thrill of the
          grass...
          He has found the bat he likes.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Can you pitch?

                         RAY

                         (WITH FALSE

                         MODESTY)
          Yeah, I'm not bad.
          Joe hands Ray the bucket of balls. Ray can barely contain
          his excitement as he races to the mound. He stands on the
          rubber and faces Joe at the plate.

                         RAY
          Don't we need a catcher?

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Not if you can get it near the plate,
          we don't.
          Ray smiles, takes a breath and starts his windup, during
          which he says aloud to himself:

                         RAY
          I am pitching to Shoeless Joe Jackson.
          He makes a pitch. It's not a very good one, and Joe has
          to step across the plate to make contact, but his swing is
          graceful, compact and effortlessly powerful. He drives the
          ball against the fence.
          Ray watches it with wonder and when he turns back, Jackson
          is gesturing with the bat for him to make the next pitch.
          Ray makes the standard pitcher's gesture for a curve ball.

                         RAY
          See if you can hit my curve.
          �He goes into an elaborate windup, throws it, it does not
          curve much, and Jackson whistles it right by Ray's ear.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         26

                         58 CONTINUED (2) 58

                         RAY
          Yes, he can hit the curve.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Stick with fast balls, kid.

                         RAY
          You bet.
          Ray makes another pitch, and Jackson hits a line drive down
          the third base line. Then a smoker down the first base
          line. Ray is mightily impressed.

                         RAY
          Wow.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Damn, this feels good. Put it right
          here, huh?
          Joe holds the bat out low over the plate and Ray pitches
          it reasonably close to that spot. Jackson hits it out of
          the park, and beams. Ray brightens up with remembrance.

                         RAY
          Right, you were a low ball hitter.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Oh man, I did love this game. You know,
          I'd have played for food money. it was
          the game, the sounds, the smells. You
          ever held a glove or a ball to your
          face?
          Ray smiles as he walks in from the mound.

                         RAY
          Yeah.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          And it was riding the trains from town
          to town. And the hotels with brass
          spittoons in the lobbies and brass beds
          in the rooms. And it was the crowd
          getting to their feet when the ball was
          hit deep. Shoot, I'd have played for
          free.
          The sound of a screen door turns their. attention to the
          house. Annie and Karin are coming out to them.

                         RAY
          My family.
          Jackson nods and then points to the floodlights.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         27

                         58 CONTINUED (3)

                         58

                         SHOELESS JOE
          What's with the lights?

                         RAY
          "All the stadiums have them now except
          Wrigley Field.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Makes it harder to see the ball.

                         RAY
          The owners found that more people could
          attend night games.

                         SHOELESS JOE

                         (SHAKES HEAD)
          Owners...
          By now, Annie and Karin have joined them.

                         RAY
          Mr. Jackson: my wife Annie, my daughter
          Karin.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Joe. Ma'm...

                         (SHAKES ANNIE'S
          hand and winks

                         AT KARIN)
          Hi.

                         KARIN
          Are you a ghost?
          Ray and Annie are instantly embarrassed, and try to cover
          with forced, nervous laughter.

                         RAY
          Karin...
          (to Shoeless Joe)
          She's just kidding.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          It's okay.

                         (TO KARIN)
          What do you think?

                         KARIN-
          You look real to me.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Then I guess I'm real.

                         ANNIE
          Would you like to come inside'?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         28

                         58 CONTINUED (4) 58

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Uh, thanks, but...I don't think I can.
          Ray and Annie look at Joe for a moment, not quite
          understanding the ground rules here. Joe senses their
          discomfort and changes the subject.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Hey, can I come back again?

                         RAY
          Yeah. I built this for you.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          There are others, you know. There were
          eight of us. It'd sure mean a lot to
          them.

                         RAY
          Oh man, anytime. They're all welcome
          here.
          Joe looks out over the field in eager anticipation of the
          good times to come.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Thank you, Ray. I appreciate it. See
          you later, huh?

                         RAY
          Yeah. See you later.

                         KARIN
          Say it ain't so, Joe!
          Joe laughs and walks to the outfield. Annie puts her arm
          around Ray and snuggles her head against his chest.
          Nearby, brook water splashes softly in the darkness, a frog
          shrills, and fireflies dazzle the night.
          Joe is in the outfield grass now, walking toward a door cut
          into the fence.

                         ANNIE
          Where's he going?

                         RAY

                         (SMILING)
          Through that door in the fence.

                         ANNIE
          Since when is there a door in the fence?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         29

                         58 CONTINUED

                         RAY

                         (SMILING EVEN

                         MORE BROADLY)
          I don't know. I didn't put one there.
          Joe reaches the door, opens it, and turns back to Ray, his
          voice carrying effortlessly through the night air.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Hey! Is this heaven?

                         RAY
          No. It's Iowa.
          Shoeless Joe Jackson nods and fades away as he walks
          through the door in the fence. Ray and Annie looks at each
          other in absolute wonder.

                         RAY
          We're keeping this field.

                         ANNIE
          You bet your ass we are.

                         CUT TO

          59 INT. RAY AND ANNIE'S LIVING ROOM - DAY 9


                         MARK
          You're going to lose your farm, pal.
          It is Sunday afternoon, and Annie's family is visiting.
          her mother, pink-faced and white-dentured, sits ramrod
          straight in an antique rocking chair. Also present are her
          brother, Mark, and his wife Dee.

                         RAY
          Come on, it's so big. How can you lose
          something so big?

                         ANNIE
          You misplaced the house once.

                         RAY
          Yeah, but it turned up two days later,
          didn't it?

                         MARK
          Ray, this stupid baseball field is going
          to bankrupt you. Everybody knows it.
          All I'm saying is if you wait till you
          default on your loan, you lose
          everything. Sell now, my partners'll

                         (MORE)

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         30

                         59 CONTINUED

                         59

                         MARK (CONT'D)
          give you a more than a fair price and
          you walk away with a nest egg.

                         RAY
          Thanks, Mark, but no.

                         MARK
          What are you holding on to this place
          for? You've never even liked Iowa. You
          don't like farming, you don't know the
          first thing about it ---

                         RAY
          Hey; I know a lot more about farming
          than you think.

                         MARK
          How could you plow under your major
          crop?

                         RAY

                         (TO ANNIE)
          What's a crop?
          Karin enters breathlessly.

                         KARIN
          Daddy, the baseball game is on.
          Ray beams. Karin returns the smile and reaches her arms
          out to be picked up. She scissors her legs around her
          father at belt level, hugging his neck.

                         RAY
          Excuse us.
          He exits, carrying Karin. Mark shakes his head.

                         MARK
          I don't believe this guy. I'm trying
          to bail him out and he goes off to watch
          television.
          Annie stifles a laugh.

                         MARK
          He used to be so normal.

                         MOTHER
          Does he beat you?

                         ANNIE
          What???

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         31

                         59 CONTINUED (2)

                         59

                         MARK
          He's drinking, right?

                         ANNIE
          He doesn't drink, and he doesn't beat
          me, okay? Now I'll grant you, he has
          gotten me to worship Satan with him, but
          just a little.
          Her mother gasps.

                         ANNIE
          Kidding... I'm kidding!
          Her family has no sense of humor about this whatsoever.

                         ANNIE
          I think we need more cheese.
          She goes into the kitchen, and when she has rounded the
          corner, she raises her eyes to heaven and mutters:

                         ANNIE
          Families.

                         60 THE FIELD 6 0
          Karin and Ray sit on the bleachers, eating peanuts while
          Shoeless Joe and his seven teammates practice. (Three,
          including Shoeless Joe, are in the outfield, two more in
          the infield, one pitches, one catches, and one bats.)
          The men are all in their twenties or thirties, but show the
          sheer enjoyment of returning after an absence of sixty-five
          years to the game they love.
          Ray directs Karin's attention to the left fielder.

                         RAY
          Watch Joe. Watch his feet as the
          pitcher gets the sign and starts to
          pitch. A good left fielder knows what
          pitch is coming, and he can tell from
          the.angle of the bat where the ball's
          going to be hit.
          At the sharp crack of the bat Shoeless Joe whirls, takes
          five loping strides toward the fence, turns again', reaches
          up, and the ball smacks into his glove.
          Karin cheers. One of the players good-naturedly boos.

                         HAPPY FELSCH
          Showoff!

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         32

                         60 CONTINUED

                         60

                         BUCK WEAVER
          Aw, stick it in your ear, Felsch.

                         EDDIE CICOTTE
          Yeah, if you'd run like that against
          Detroit I'da won twenty games that year.

                         HAPPY FELSCH
          Oh for Pete's sake, that was sixty-five
          years ago! Give it up, will ya...

                         SWEDE RISBERG
          Hey., you guys wanna play ball, or what?

                         HAPPY FELSCH
          .you muscle-bound jerk.

                         EDDIE CICOTTE
          Oh yeah? At least I got muscles.

                         HAPPY FELSCH
          No. At most you got muscles.

                         BUCK WEAVER
          Come on, asshole, pitch!
          The good-natured banter stops short, and the other players
          glare at Weaver who looks sheepishly toward the little girl
          and her father in the bleachers.

                         BUCK WEAVER
          Sorry, kid.

                         KARIN
          It's okay!

                         PLAYERS
          All right,'Karin!
          The players resume their practicing and ribbing.

          61 EXT. HOUSE


                         61
          Annie emerges with-her Mother, Mark and Dee, walking toward
          the bleachers where Karin and Ray are still watching the
          spirited practice.

                         ANNIE
          Ray? Mom's leaving.

                         RAY
          Oh. Well, it was...you know, thanks for
          coming.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         33

                         61 CONTINUED

                         61

                         MARK
          Think about what I said. I just want
          to help.

                         RAY
          I know.
          Mark just stands there for a moment, the only sounds coming
          from the players on the, field.

                         MARK
          I thought you two were going to watch
          some game.

                         RAY
          Oh, I guess it's not really a game.
          It's more like a practice.
          Mark looks at his wife and Mother with concern. Ray
          doesn't understand this reaction.

                         RAY
          See, there's only eight of them, so they
          can't play a real game...

                         MARK
          Eight of what?
          Ray points to the noisy players on the field.

                         RAY
          Them.
          Now, Mother and Dee look as if they're about to go into
          mourning. Mark kneels next to Karin.

                         MARK
          Karin honey... what are you watching?

                         KARIN
          The baseball men.

                         MARK
          Do you see any baseball men right now?

                         KARIN

                         (SLIGHTLY

                         ANNOYED)
          Of course I do.
          Mark stands up and shoots Ray an accusing look. Annie's
          Mother starts to walk away.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         34

                         61 CONTINUED (2) 61

                          MOTHER
           I don't think it's very polite to try
           to make other people feel stupid.
           Annie questions Mark and Dee as they pass her on the way
           to catch up with Mother.

                         ANNIE
          You don't see it?

                         DEE
          That's not funny, Annie.
          Her family leaves in a huff.

                         ANNIE
          They couldn't see it.

                         RAY
          Interesting.
          He and Annie sit beside Karin and watch the players. Each
          slowly starts to smile.

                         CUT TO

          62 ON THE FIELD - LATER 62
          The practice is over, the players are perspired and
          exhilarated. Ray is over at first base talking with Swede
          Risberg, the shortstop.

                         SWEDE RISBERG
          Here, look at this. Sixty-five years
          since I worn this uniform, still fits
          me like a glove.

                         RAY
          You must keep in pretty good shape.

                         SWEDE RISBERG

                         (NODS)
          I died in '75. So I ain't had a
          cigarette in, what, thirteen years. You
          don't smoke, do you?

                         RAY
          No.

                         SHOELESS JOE

                         (APPROACHING)
          Felt good out there today, huh, guys?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         35

                         62 CONTINUED 62

                          BUCK WEAVER
           Fuckin' A!

                         PLAYERS
          Weaver!
          Buck realizes that once again he has cursed in front of
          Karin.

                         WEAVER
          Oh shit. I mean, sorry. I'm sorry.
          Annie calls from the house.

                         ANNIE
          Ray! Dinner!

          SOME OF THE PLAYERS

                         (FALSETTO)
          Ra--ay! Dinner!
          They all laugh. Ray clearly loves being part of this
          locker room-style comradery. Karin runs to the house.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Come on, fellas. Let's hit the
          showers.

                         (TO RAY)
          See you later, Ray.

                         RAY
          Right. See you guys.
          The players call their "good-byes" to Ray and head for the
          door in the outfield fence. Ray watches them fade out as
          they go through the door. Then he takes a moment to look
          around him.
          The baseball diamond set in the cornfield is quite
          beautiful. Ray takes a satisfied breath, and walks back
          toward his house. He is the very picture of contentment.
          Then he hears The Voice.

                         THE VOICE
          'Ease his pain.'
          Ray stops short.

                         RAY
          What?
          No response.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         36

                         62 CONTINUED (2)

                         62

                         RAY
          I'm sorry. I didn't understand.

                         THE VOICE
          'Ease his pain.'
          Ray stops short.

                         RAY
          What?
          No response.

                         RAY
          I'm sorry. I didn't understand.

                         THE VOICE
          'Ease his pain.'

                         RAY
          Whose pain? What pain?
          No response.

                         RAY
          Why me?
          But there is no response.

          63 INT. HOUSE


                          63
           Ray enters as Annie and Karin are putting dinner on the
           table. Ray plops- into his chair at the head of the table.

                         ANNIE
          Come on, wash up. We've got a PTA
          meeting after dinner. They're talking
          about banning books again. Really
          subversive books like, Wizard of Oz,
          Diary of Anne Frank ---
          She notices Ray is strangely silent.

                         ANNIE
          What happened to you?

                         PAY
          The Voice is back.

                         ANNIE
          Oh Lord, you don't have to build a
          football field now, do you?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         37

                         63 CONTINUED"

                         63

                         RAY
          (shakes head no)
          He said...'Ease his pain.'

                         ANNIE
          Ease whose pain?

                         RAY
          I asked him. He wouldn't tell me.

                         ANNIE
          Shoeless Joe's?

                         RAY
          I don't think so.

                         ANNIE
          One of the other players?

                         RAY
          I don't think so.

                         ANNIE
          This is a very non-specific voice you've
          got out there, Ray, and he's really
          starting to piss me off.
          Ray nods as Annie serves the meal in silence.

                         CUT TO

                         64

          EXT. IOWA CITY PUBLIC SCHOOL BUILDING - NIGHT 64

          Parents stream in past the "PTA Meeting Tonite" sign. Ray
          and Annie stand by the doorway, talking with Miss Corser,
          Karin's teacher. (Ray is too distracted by his own
          thoughts to pay this much attention.)

                         MISS CORSER
          Karin has such a wonderful imagination.
          Lately, she's been making up these
          charming little stories about ghosts who
          play baseball in a cornfield... wonderful
          imagination.

                         ANNIE

                         (WITH A

                         MYSTERIOUS

                         SMILE)
          Yes. She gets that from Ray.
          Miss Corser smiles approvingly. Ray realizes both women
          are looking at him, now, and he emerges from his thoughts.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         38

                         64 CONTINUED

                          64

                          RAY
           Hmm?
          Annie leads Ray inside.

          65 INT. SCHOOL LIBRARY - NIGHT


                         65
          Ray and Annie -- along with a hundred or so other grownups
          -- are sitting in chairs too small for their grownup
          backsides. Ray is still lost in his own thoughts, doodling
          "Ease his pain" over and over again, while an Irate Mother
          has the floor, holding up a novel.

                         IRATE MOTHER
          .and I say smut and filth like this has
          no place in our schools!
          A large portion of the audience applauds. Annie whispers
          snarlingly to Ray:

                         ANNIE
          Fascist. I'd like to ease her pain.
          Ray is still lost in thought.

                         PRINCIPAL
          Mrs. Perkins, the book you are waving
          about is hardly smut. It is considered
          by many critics as the classic novel
          about growing up in the 1960s.

                         ANNIE
          (whispers to Ray)
          I read it four times. Funniest book I
          ever read.

                         IRATE MOTHER
          It's pornography!

                         PRINCIPAL
          The Supreme Court said its not. And
          its author, Mr. Mann ---

                         ANGRY FATHER
          -- is sick!

                         PRINCIPAL
          Terence Mann is a Pulitzer prize-winner,
          and was widely regarded as the finest
          satirist of his time.

                         IRATE MOTHER
          Well I think he's a pervert, and quite
          probably a Communist, too!

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         39

                         65 CONTINUED 65
          The crowd murmurs its assent.

                         ANNIE

                         (TO RAY)
          What planet are these people from?
          Ray looks as if he is starting to realize something.

                         ANOTHER PARENT

                         (READING FROM

                         NOTES)
          The se-called novels of Terence Mann
          endorse promiscuity, godlessness, the
          mongrelization of races, and disrespect
          to high-ranking officers of the United
          States Army. And that's why right-
          thinking school boards all across the
           country have been banning this guy's
          shit since 1969.

                         RAY

                         (TO HIMSELF)
          Terence Mann...

                         IRATE MOTHER
          You know why he stopped writing books?
          Because he masturbates!

                         ANNIE

                         (TO RAY)
          I can't take this anymore.

                         RAY

                         (VERY INTERESTED)
          ,Terence Mann...
          Annie stands and smiles disarmingly.

                         ANNIE

                         (VERY REASONABLY)
          Excuse me, madam, but you're speaking
          of something about which you don't know
          squat. Terence Mann was a warm and
          gentle voice of.reason during a time of
          great madness. He coined the phrase
          'Make Love, Not War.' When others were
          chanting 'Burn, baby, burn,' he was
          writing about love, and peace, and
          understanding. He helped define an era.
          And a generation. And he helped us
          laugh at ourselves. I cherished every
          one of his books, and I dearly wish he'd
          write more. And if you had experienced
          even a little bit of the Sixties, you
          might feel the same way, too.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         40

                         65 CONTINUED (2)

                         IRATE MOTHER
          I experienced the sixties.

                         ANNIE
          No. I think you had two Fifties, and
          moved right on to the Seventies.

                         IRATE MOTHER
          Oh yeah? Well your husband plowed under
          his corn and built a baseball field!
          The crowd "oohs" and "aahs."

                         ANNIE
          Now there's an intelligent response.

                         IRATE MOTHER
          The weirdo.
          Ray is so excited at his revelation that he really wants
          to leave immediately. He tugs Annie's sleeve.

                         RAY
          Annie...
          But Annie mistakes her husband's intentions. She thinks
          he is cautioning her not to get embroiled in trouble.

                         ANNIE

                         (TO RAY)
          It's okay, I'll be cool.
          (aloud, to the

                         PARENT)
          At least he's not a book burner, you
          Nazi cow!
          Now the crowd erupts.

                         IRATE PARENT
          You're both a bunch of weirdos!
          Annie pulls herself up to her full 5'4" and thrusts an
          angry finger at. the woman.

                         ANNIE
          All right Beulah, you wanna step
          outside?!? Huh?
          The other woman takes a half-step backward. No one has
          ever seen sweet Annie like this.

                         ANNIE
          I got a better idea. Let's put it to
          a vote. Come on! Who's for Eva Braun

                         (MORE)

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         41

                         65 CONTINUED (3)

                          ANNIE (CONT'D)
          here? Who wants to burn books? Who
          wants to piss on the Constitution of the
          United Sates? Anybody?
          The majority who had sided with the book-banner wants to
          vote for censorship, but under these terms just can't raise
          their arms. Little Annie is on a roll, now.

                         ANNIE
          All right. Now: who's for The Bill of
          Rights? Come on...who thinks freedom's
          a pretty good thing? Let's see those
          hands.
          Some people start raising their hands.

                         ANNIE
          Who thinks we have to stand up to the
          kind of censorship they have in Russia?
          Reluctantly, just about everyone raises their hands. Annie
          is thrilled.

                         ANNIE
          There you go. All right, America! I'm
          proud of you. I mean it. You're
          beautiful!

                         RAY

                         (RISING)
          Annie, we gotta go.

                         ANNIE
          (to the crowd)
          We gotta go.
          Ray pulls her from the room. Each is proud as hell, each
          for a different reason.

          66 EXT. SCHOOL - NIGHT


                         66
          as they burst out, bubbling over with their enthusiasm.

                         ANNIE
          Oh Ray, was that great, or what? it was
          like the Sixties again.

                         RAY
          I figured it out.

                         ANNIE

                         (RELIVING IT)
          'Step outside, you Nazi cow.' Ha-ha!

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         42

          66 - - CONTINUED

                         66

                         RAY
          I know whose pain I'm supposed to ease.

                         ANNIE

                         (STOPPING SHORT)
          What?

                         RAY
          I know whose pain I'm supposed to ease.

                         ANNIE
          Ray, I just halted the spread of
          neo-facism in America, and you're
          talking about ---

                         RAY
          Terence Mann.

                         ANNIE
          What about him?

                         RAY
          That's whose pain.

                         ANNIE
          How do you know that?

                         RAY
          I don't know. I just know. I was right
          about building the field, wasn't I?

                         ANNIE
          What's his pain?

                         RAY
          I don't know.

                         ANNIE
          Then how are you supposed to ease it?

                         RAY
          I don't know.
          None of this questioning has dampened Ray's pride and
          excitement. Annie shakes her head.

                         ANNIE
          Ray...

                         RAY
          Annie.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         43

                         66 CONTINUED (2)

                         66

                         ANNIE
          (tries to put

                         THIS GENTLY)
          He's my favorite writer too,
          but...what's Terence Mann got to do with
          baseball?
          Ray's smile freezes. Then disappears. He hasn't a clue.

                         CUT TO

          67 INT. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LIBRARY - DAY 67

          A montage of Ray at the library: checking indices, reading
          old magazines, finding newspaper interviews on microfilm,
          s couring old anthologies, and taking copious notes.
          Some of the articles include: "Where is Terence Mann Now
          That We Really Need Him?". ."20 Rumors About America's
          Greatest Living Ex-Writer" ... and , "Terence Mann: Still
          Ignoring Us After All These Years ". The photographs show
          Mann to be a large black man with gentle eyes.

          RAY (V.O.)
          Annie, it's incredible.

          68 EXT. LIBRARY


                         6 8
          Ray and Annie run down the steps to the street for their
          car, Ray's words racing as fast as his feet.

                         RAY
          By the early Seventies, the guy decides
          people have become either too extremist
          or too apathetic to listen to him. So
          he stops writing books. He starts
          writing poetry. About whales and stuff.
          Then, he starts fooling around with a
          home computer, and gets hooked. Know
          what he does now?
          Annie shakes her head no.

                         RAY
          He writes software for interactive
          children's videos. They teach kids how
          to resolve conflicts peacefully. What
          an amazing guy..

                         ANNIE
          Right. So what's it got to do with
          baseball?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         44

                         68 CONTINUED

                          68

                          RAY
           In the April 1962 issue of Jet Magazine,
           there's a story of his called 'This Is
          Not A Pipe.'
          Annie laughs at that. Ray is so excited, he laughs too.

                         RAY
          It's not his best work, but the hero of
          the story, a character that Mann created
          twenty-six years ago, is named John
          Kinsella. My father.
          She stops short.

                         ANNIE
          -Wow.
          He gives her a "See? What'd I tell you?" look.

                         ANNIE
          What can I say... Big wow, but..what's
          it got to do with baseball?
          They are standing by their car.

                         RAY
          You drive.

          69 INT. CAR


                         69
          Annie drives as Ray excitedly consults his notes.

                         RAY
          Okay. The last interview-he ever gave
          was in 1973. Guess what it's about.

                         ANNIE
          Mmm. Some kind of team sport?

                         RAY
          Annie, he was a baseball fanatic!
          Listen to this:
          He finds a page and reads from it:

                         RAY
          'As a child, my earliest recurring dream
          was to play at Ebbets Field with Jackie
          Robinson and the Brooklyn Dodgers. Of
          course, it never happened, and the
          Dodgers left Brooklyn, and they torn
          down Ebbets Field. But even now, I
          still dream that dream.'

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         45

                         69 CONTINUED

                         69

                         ANNIE
          That's sad...

          70 EXT. RAY AND ANNIE'S HOUSE - DAY 70

          They have arrived home and are walking into the house. He
          is still spouting things to her his research has uncovered.

                         RAY
          The man wrote the best books of his
          generation, he was a pioneer in the
          civil rights and anti-war movements, he
          made the cover of Newsweek, he knew
          everybody, he did everyting...he helped
          shape his time. He hung out with the
          Beatles! But in the end, it wasn't
          enough. What he missed ...was'baseball.
          Annie takes a look at Ray's handful of Xeroxes.

                         ANNIE
          Oh my God!

                         RAY
          What.

                         ANNIE

                         (SPOOKILY)
          As a small boy, he had a bat named
          'Rosebud.'
          Ray disapprovingly grabs the Xeroxes back.from her.

                         ANNIE
          Sorry.

                         RAY

                         (CONTINUES

                         READING)
          He hasn't been to a live baseball game
          since 1958.

                         ANNIE
          So to ease his pain, you have to take
          him to a ball game?

                         RAY
          Yes.

          71 INT. HOUSE 71

          as they enter and put away their things.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         46

                         71 CONTINUED 71

                         ANNIE
          Ray, this is nuttier than building the
          field.

                         RAY
          No it's not. It's pretty weird, I grant
          you, but building the field was weirder.
          Five, ten percent weirder.

                         ANNIE
          I'm sorry, pal, but I have to nip this
          one in the bud. We are having moderate
          to heavy financial difficulties here.
          You cannot take off for Boston while
          you're going broke in Iowa.

                         RAY
          Annie, this is really new territory for
          both of us, I know, but we're dealing
          with primal forces of nature, here.
          When primal forces of nature tell you
          to do something, the prudent thing is
          not to quibble over details and ---

                         ANNIE
          (starting to get

                         PISSED)
          But why do you have to go? Why can't
          the voice send someone else? What's
          wrong with Shirley MacLaine, she too
          busy? What does this have to do with
          you???
          Ray hears her anger and sits her down.

                         RAY
          That's what I need to find out.

                         ANNIE
          Ray, we're behind on the mortgage. That
          field ate up our savings. We could lose
          the farm.

                         RAY
          I won't even stay in motels. I'll sleep
          in the car, and I'll beg for food.

                         ANNIE
          No. This is too much.- I understand
          your need to prove to the world you're
          not turning into your father, but you've
          done it! You believed in the magic, and
          it came true. Isn't that enough?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         47

                         71 CONTINUED (2) 71

                         RAY
          Annie, it's more than that. I know this-
          is nuts, but there's another reason I'm
          supposed to do it. I feel it. I feel
          it as strongly as I've ever felt
          anything in my life. There's a reason.

                         ANNIE
          What. Just tell me what it is.

                         RAY
          I think something's going to happen at
          the game. I don't know what,
          but...there's something at Fenway Park
          in Boston, and I have to be there with
          Terence Mann to find it.
          Something he just said changes Annie's mood.

                         ANNIE
          Fenway Park... Is that the one with the
          big green wall in left field?

                         RAY
          Yeah.

                         ANNIE
          I dreamt last night you were at Fenway.

                         RAY
          Uh, was I sitting on the first base
          side?

                         ANNIE
          Yes...

                         RAY
          About the fifth row?

                         ANNIE
          (nods,

                         OPEN-MOUTHED)
          You were keeping score and eating

                         RAY
          -- a hot dog. I had the same dream.

                         ANNIE
          I'll help you pack.

                         CUT TO

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         48

          72 INT. BEDROOM 72-

          Ray is throwing clothes into a suitcase as fast as he can.
          Annie reads from a road map she has marked for him.

                         ANNIE
          .you take that to 93, and then it gets
          all squiggly, and after that you're on
          your own. How are you going to find
          him, anyway? He won't exactly be in the
          phone book, you know.

                         RAY
          The article says he has a storefront on
          Harvard Street next to some place that
          sells Kosher food. Shouldn't be too
          hard to find. I don't need a tie, do

          I?

                         ANNIE
          No, dear. Not for a kidnapping.

          73 EXT. HOUSE 73

          Ray has packed the car and is getting ready to leave.

                         RAY
          You'll be okay, right?

                         ANNIE
          I'll try to sell the combine. We sure
          don't need it anymore.
          Karin runs up, grabs Ray behind each ear and hugs and
          kisses him.

                         RAY
          So long Tiger.
          He get into the car and looks up at Annie.

                         RAY
          I'll call you every night. If the team
          shows up while I'm gone, just tell
          them...
          (shakes his head)
          On second thought, stay away from them.
          Those guys haven't been near a woman
          since 1922.

                         ANNIE
          Ray, they're not going to make a pass
          at me. They're'ghosts.

                         RAY
          They're jocks. Keep away from them.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         49

                         7 3 CONTINUED 73
          She laughs, kisses him, and watches him drive off.

                         CUT TO

          74 ON THE ROAD 74
          Ray's brave little Datsun chugs along the interstate
          between eighteen-wheelers, busses, gasoline tankers,
          auto-transport trucks, and other monsters.

                         75 TRAVELING MONTAGE 75
          Driving...gas stations...boring roadside restaurants...
          getting lost...looking at the map...signs that announce the
          "Entering" and "Leaving" of various states...days turning
          to nights and back again... .Finally, the green hills of
          Massachusetts.

                         CUT TO

          76 BOSTON - DAY 76
          He emerges from a tunnel and enters traffic, the likes of
          which he has not seen in a very long time. On one side of
          the expressway there are sweaty factories, and on the
          other, old wood-frame apartment buildings with advertising
          for long-forgotten products painted on the sides. Lunatic
          drivers abound. We are not in Iowa anymore.

          77 INT.-RAY'S CAR 77

          He rehearses as he drives.

                         RAY
          Hi, I'm Ray Kinsella. I'm really a big
          fan of...

                         (DIFFERENT)
          How do you, Mr. Mann, I have to take you
          to a baseball game.

                         (SHAKES HEAD)
          All right, put your hands up and get in
          the trunk!

                         (FACETIOUSLY)
          Good.

          78 HARVARD STREET - BROOKLINE - DAY 78
          Ray drives slowly, looking for a store that sells Kosher
          food. But in this old newish neighborhood, there are
          dozens: butcher shops, delis, bakeries, groceries.

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         50

          79- INT. KOSHER BUTCHER SHOP 79

          Ray is asking the spritely Jewish Butcher for directions.

                         RAY
          He lives right around here. Do you know
          him? I'm a friend of his.
          The Butcher just stares back, with suspicion.

                         RAY
          He's sort of a tall, black man.

                         BUTCHER
          If you was much of a friend, he'd of
          give you the directions himself.
          Ray nods. He knows this is useless.

                         RAY
          That's a good point. Thank you.
          Ray exits.

                         CUT TO

          80 ON THE STREET 80
          Ray has stopped an Ancient Jewish Woman on the street. She
          looks from Ray's Iowa license plate to Ray's face.

                         ANCIENT WOMAN
          I don't know where he lives.
          But by her raised eyebrows and the tone of her voice, it
          is clear that if she did know -- which she probably does
          -- she certainly wouldn't tell him.

                         CUT TO

                         81 GAS STATION 81
          Ray has pulled his car to the edge of the gas station --
          he is not buying gas -- and slips a five dollar bill to the
          ruddy-faced, teenaged Irish Pump Jockey.

                         PUMP JOCKEY
          Two blocks down. Right hand side.
          First store that don't have a chicken
          in the window, is his.

                         CUT TO

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         51

          82 EXT. HARVARD STREET - DAY


                         82
          In between a deli and a Kosher butcher shop, Ray finds a
          storefront with blacked-out windows. He enters an open
          hallway in which he sees the door to the storefront, as
          well as stairs to the apartments above it.
          There are half-a-dozen mail boxes on the wall. Ray checks
          the names. He smiles.

                         83 INSERT- MAILBOXES

                          83
           All but one have immigrant names. The first one reads:

           #1: TIE-DYED SOFTWARE.

                         84 RAY

                         84
          Ray turns to the storefront door. Instead of a buzzer
          there is a long wire with a weight on its end hanging from
          a hole at the top of the door. Next to the wire is a
          handwritten note taped to the door, which reads: "You
          better have a goddamn good reason for ringing this bell."
          Ray laughs. This guy is great. He pulls on the wire. On
          the other side of the door, a bell rings.
          Ray has to struggle to control his nervousness. He takes
          a breath. He hears footsteps inside, approaching the door.
          He cannot help but smile with delight at the thought of
          meeting one of his cultural heroes.
          The door opens. Terence Mann is menacingly huge. He
          glares at Ray and roars:

                         MANN
          Who the fuck are you???-
          Ray is momentarily taken aback, but he figures maybe the
          guy is joking, so he just smiles and plunges ahead.

                         RAY
          Sir, my name is Ray Kinsella, and it's
          a great pleasure 'Co finally ---
          The door slams in his face. It takes Ray a few seconds to
          realize the interview is over.
          He rings the bell again. The door opens. Mann�s large
          frame fills it.

                         MANN
          We got a learning disability here?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         52

                         84 CONTINUED

                         84

                         RAY

                         (TALKS FAST)
          Mr. Mann, I've come 1500 miles to see
          you at the risk of losing my home and
          alienating my wife. If I could just
          have a minute. Please.

                         MANN
          Look. I can't tell you the secret of
          life, and I don't have any answers for
          you. I don't give interviews, I am no
          longer a public figure, I just want to
          be left alone. So fuck off.

                         RAY
          Just one minute. I'm begging you.
          Mann looks him over. Then he sighs.

                         MANN
          One minute.
          Mann turns and enters the storefront. Ray follows.

          85 INT. MANN'S STOREFRONT

          It is hardly fashionable, but it's roomy and comfortable.
          There are tables stacked high with mailing envelopes and
          a postage scale. A few workbenches have software and
          spread sheets strewn across them. In the back are a couple
          of personal computers.
          On a side wall there are book jackets and newspaper photos
          in cheap frames: pictures of Mann with Martin Luther
          King...with Bob Dylan...with Timothy Leary...rann being
          arrested at some demonstration.. .Mann at Woodstock...
          Mann's gruff voice pulls Ray's attention away from these
          relics.

                         MANN
          Your minute ain't getting bigger.

                         RAY
          Okay. I understand your desire for
          privacy, and i wouldn't dream of
          intruding if this weren't extremely
          important.

                         MANN
          Oh God. I don't do causes anymore.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         53

                         85 -CONTINUED

                         85

                         RAY
          This isn't a cause. I don't need money,
          or an endorsement.

                         MANN
          Refreshing.

                         RAY
          You once wrote: 'There comes a time
          when all the cosmic tumblers have
          clicked into place, and the universe
          opens itself up for a few seconds, to
          show you what is possible.'

                         MANN
          Oh my God.

                         RAY
          What.

                         MANN
          You're from the Sixties!

                         RAY
          Well, actually ---

                         MANN
          Out! Out!

                         RAY
          Just wait a second ---
          Mann picks up an old-fashioned bug sprayer -- the kind with
          a long arm that pumps in and out -- and starts spraying it
          at Ray as if he were an unwanted insect.

                         MANN
          Back to the Sixties! Back!
          He is backing Ray out the door.

                         RAY
          If you'd just ---

                         MANN
          There's no place for you here in the
          future! Get back while you still can!
          He gets Ray just past the door and slams it shut.
          Ray slams it open. He's pissed.

                         RAY
          You've changed, you know that?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         54

                         85 CONTINUED (2) 85
          Mann stops fuming and considers that. He sighs, sadly.

                         MANN
          Yes. I suppose I have. How's this?
          (smiles and makes
          the peace sign)
          'Peace, love, dope.'

                         (ROARS)
          Now get the fuck out of here!!!
          And he slams the door shut again. Ray is flabbergasted.
          He is thinking furiously. Then he notices that in slamming
          the door, the latch has not locked in place. He thinks,
          makes up his mind, and quietly opens the door.
          Mann has returned to work, his back to the door.
          Ray enters the loft, his left hand in his jacket pocket.
          When he is halfway across the loft, he clears his throat.
          Mann spins around.

                         MANN
          Now you've pissed me off.

                         RAY
          Okay, hold it right there.
          He juts his pocketed hand forward, as if he had a gun in
          his jacket.

                         RAY
          I was hoping I wouldn't have to do it
          this way...

                         MANN
          What the fuck is that?

                         RAY
          It's a gun. What'd you think it is?

                         MANN
          It's your finger.

                         RAY
          No it's not. It's a gun.

                         MANN
          Yeah? Let me see it.

                         RAY
          Get out of here, I'm not going to show
          you my gun.
          Mann sighs, and stands.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         55

                         85 CONTINUED (3)

                         85

                         RAY
          Now look. I'm not going to hurt you,
          I just need you to go with me for a
          little while, then -- what are you
          doing?
          Mann has found a crowbar among his tools, and is advancing
          toward Ray.

                         MANN
          I'm going to beat you with a crowbar
          till you go away.
          Understandably, this makes Ray nervous.

                         RAY
          Whoa! Wait! You can't do that.

                         MANN

                         (STILL ADVANCING)
          What, are there rules? There's no
          rules.
          Mann is almost to him, now, the crowbar raised above his
          head.

                         RAY
          You're a pacifist!
          Mann stops. He thinks. He lowers the crowbar.

                         MANN
          Shit.
          Ray breathes a sigh of relief.

                         RAY
          Thank you.

                         MANN
          All right, are you kidnapping me?
          What's the deal here?

                         RAY
          I'm sorry. I was hoping I could-just
          convince you to come with me.

                         MANN
          Then you are kidnapping me.

                         RAY
          I have to take you to a baseball game.

                         MANN
          You what?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         56

                         - 85 CONTINUED (4) 85

                         RAY
          Tonight's game. Red.Sox, Twins.

                         MANN
          Why?

                         RAY
          Something will happen there. I don't
          know what, but we'll find out when it
          does.
          Mann now has no idea what to make of all this, so he just
          looks Ray over for a few seconds.

                         RAY
          My name is Ray Kinsella. You used my
          father's name for a character in one of
          your stories. John Kinsella.

                         MANN
          You're seeing a team of psychiatrists,
          aren't you?

                         RAY

                         (LAUGHS)
          I don't blame you for thinking that, but
          no, I'm not. I swear to God I'm the
          least crazy person I've ever known.

                         MANN
          Then why are you kidnapping me to a
          baseball game?

                         RAY
          I read an interview you gave a long time
          ago about how you always dreamed of
          playing at Ebbets Field, and how sad you
          felt when they tore it down.

                         MANN
          (shakes head no)
          I never said that.

                         RAY
          You didn't?

                         MANN
          I don't even remember thinking it.
          Now Ray is ndt sure what to do.

                         RAY
          This whole. thing is so weird.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         57

                         85 CONTINUED (5)

                         85

                         MANN
          Then why go through with it?

                         RAY
          It's a long story...and I'll tell you
          on the way. Please.

                         MANN
          I'm not going to get rid of you, am I?

                         RAY
          If you just come to this game with me,
          I'll never bother you again. Not even
          a Christmas card.
          Mann picks up a hat,
          .plops it on his head and heads out the
          door.

                         CUT TO

                         86 CITY STREETS

                         86
          Mann sits tensely beside Ray, who drives with his right
          hand, while his left hand remains in his pocket,
          substituting for a gun.

                         MANN
          You do this often?

                         RAY
          No. It's my first time. So be gentle.
          Ray laughs nervously, and is embarrassed to see Mann not
          sharing the humor.

                         RAY
          You used to have a sense of humor.

                         MANN
          Things used to be funny.
          Ray pulls up at an intersection. He has to choose between
          left and right. Behind him, cars are honking. Ray doesn't
          have a clue which way to go. He sighs.

                         RAY
          I'm sorry. This is really humiliating.
          Which way is-Eenway?
          Mann shakes his head, then tilts it to the left.

                         RAY
          Thank you.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         58

                         86 CONTINUED

                         86
          Ray makes the turn, and heads off down the street.

                         MANN
          You're really inept at this, aren't you?
          Ray grins sheepishly and nods. Mann laughs.

                         MANN
          I mean you're like a total bumbler.
          Ray chuckles his reluctant acceptance of the truth.

                         MANN
          'Bozo the Kidnapper.

                         RAY
          (no longer so

                         AMUSED)
          Okay, okay...
          After a few moments, Ray decidesto break the ice.

                         RAY
          Can I ask you a question? Something
          I've always wanted to know.
          Mann nods. He's been asked this question a million times.

                         MANN
          No, I never slept with her.

                         RAY
          You never slept with who?

                         MANN
          Whoever you were going to ask me about.
          If I'd been with one-tenth the famous
          women they said I was with, I'd be in
          formaldehyde by now.

                         RAY

                         (INTERESTED)
          You slept with a lot of famous women?

                         MANN

                         (SOURLY)
          What's your question?

                         RAY
          How'd you get a name like Terence?
          Mann cannot believe that's the question.

                         MANN
          Rastus was taken.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         59

                         86 CONTINUED (2)

                         86
          Ray knows now to shut up. He returns his attention to his
          driving, glances up to his rearview mirror, and sees
          something that causes his eyes to widen in horror.

                         87 REAR-VIEW MIRROR

                         87
          A Boston police car on his tail, red lights flashing.

          RAY (O.S.)
          Oh no.

          88 INT. RAY'S CAR 88

          Mann looks behind him, sees the police car, and turns back
          to Ray. Ray wears a look of resignation as he pulls the
          car over to the side of the road, and shuts off the
          ignition. Mann just looks at him, and starts to chuckle.

                         MANN
          Nice going, Boze.

                         RAY
          Okay. I don't really have a gun. So
          don't say anything to this guy, okay?
          I swear to God there's a reason we're
          supposed to be at this game.
          Mann gives him a "Give me a break" look.
          Ray sees the Policeman is getting out of his cruiser and
          walking towards them. Ray is desperate.

                         RAY
          If I get arrested, the press'll be all
          over you, you'll have to appear in open
          court, you'll be the lead story on
          Entertainment Tonight, and your
          picture'll be on the front page of every
          tabloid in America.
          The Policeman knocks on Ray's window. He is young,
          fresh-scrubbed and earnest. Ray holds up one hand to him.

                         RAY
          Just a second.

                         (-CO MANN)
          'Terence-Mann Kidnapped... Also seen in
          UFO with Elvis.'
          Mann's eyes narrow. The cop knocks again, more
          insistently. Ray rolls down-the window."

                         CONTINUED'

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         60

                         88 CONTINUED

                         88

                         RAY
          Sorry.

                         POLICEMAN
          License and registration.
          Nervously, Ray complies. Mann turns his face toward the
          passenger side window. Ray's mouth dries up. He has no
          idea what Mann will do.
          The Policeman scrutinizes the license, turns it over to
          look for convictions, and checks Ray's face against the
          felonlike photo. Then he looks at Mann.

                         POLICEMAN
          And what's your name,-sir?
          Mann keeps his face averted.

                         MANN
          Terry.

                         POLICEMAN
          Where is it that you and Raymond are
          going, Terry?

                         RAY
          Fenway Park! We're going to the ball
          game.

                         MANN
          (turns to cop)
          Actually, Officer, I'm being kidnapped.
          Discreetly, under his breath, Ray sings the "Entertainment
          Tonight" theme song.

                         RAY
          'Entertainment Tonight,
          doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo...
          Mann winces. The officer looks at him questioningly.

          MANN,
          What I mean by that is, I don't care
          much for baseball, but Raymond insisted.

                         POLICEMAN
          Yeah, I hate baseball.
          (hands Ray back

                         HIS ID)
          Your right taillight is out, Raymond.
          I want you to get it fixed at the first
          opportunity.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         61

                         88 CONTINUED (2)

                         88

                         RAY
          Yes. I will. Thank you.
          The Policeman walks away, and Ray heaves a sigh of relief.

                         RAY
          'Terry?'

                         MANN
          'Raymond?'

                         RAY
          Ray. My...hostages call me Ray. Can
          I call you Terry?
          Sourly, Mann nods. Ray smiles and drives off.

                         RAY
          And thank you.

                         MANN
          I didn't do it just because I don't want
          the publicity.

                         RAY
          Then what else?

                         MANN
          I envy you your craziness, Ray. It's
          been years since I did something
          completely crazy.

                         RAY
          Well, you want to hear something really
          crazy?

                         MANN
          Do I have a choice?

                         RAY
          Nope. I live on a farm in Iowa. One
          day, out in the cornfield, I heard a
          voice...

          89 EXT. CAR


                         89
          It glides through city traffic.

          90 EXT. FENWAY PARK - DAY


                         90
          Ray slides the Datsun into a parking place, and he and Mann
          walk the short sleazy block to Fenway, and old-fashioned
          center-city ballpark.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         62

                         90 CONTINUED 90

                         MANN

                         (SHAKING HIS

                         HEAD)
          But can't you accept the probability
          that it's all just a hallucination?

                         RAY
          Annie and Karin see it, too.
          They have reached the ticket window.

                         RAY
          Two, field level, first base side.
          The elderly Ticket Seller pulls out two tickets.

                         TICKET SELLER
          Section seventeen. Twelve dollars.
          Ray takes out his wallet and turns to Mann..

                         RAY
          It's on me.

                         MANN
          You're damn right it is.
          Ray pays the man and receives the tickets.

                         TICKET SELLER
          Game don't start for a while, but you
          can go in, watch batting practice.

                         RAY
          Great.
          They enter the stadium.

          91 INT. STADIUM 91

          They walk through the indoor portion of the grandstand
          toward their section.

                         RAY
          So what do you do with yourself these
          days?

                         MANN
          I live. I work. I've learned to cook.
          I take walks. I watch sunsets.

                         RAY
          Don't you miss being... involved?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         63

                         91 CONTINUED 91

                         MANN

                         (SNORTS)
          I was the East Coast distributor of
          'involved.'. I ate it, drank it, and
          breathed it. Then they killed Martin.
          They killed Bobby. And then they
          elected Tricky Dick. Twice. And now,
          people like you think I must be
          miserable that I'm not involved anymore.
          Well, I've got news for you: I spent all
          my misery years ago. I have no more
          pain for any of you. I gave at the
          office.
          They approach the refreshment stand.

                         RAY
          So...what do you want?

          . MANN
          I want them to stop looking to me for
          answers. Begging me to speak again,
          write again, be a leader. I want them
          to start thinking for themselves. And
          I want my privacy!
          Ray looks slightly embarrassed.

                         RAY
          No, I meant what do you want from...
          Ray points to the hot dog vendor, as they have reached the
          front of the line.

                         MANN
          Oh.

                         (LAUGHS AT

                         HIMSELF)
          A dog and a beer.

                         RAY
          (to the vendor)
          Two.

                         (TO MANN)
          Okay, I agree, you should be entitled
          to as much privacy as you wane. But why
          stop writing?

                         MANN
          I haven't published a word in seventeen
          years and I still have to endure
          assholes like you all the time. What
          do you think it'd be like if I suddenly
          came out with a new book?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         64

                         91 CONTINUED (2)

                         91
          Ray nods. Mann is making sense.

                         MANN
          They'd bleed me dry.

                         92 SECTION SEVENTEEN

                         92
          Ray and Mann emerge into the sunlight and walk down the
          aisle toward the field.

                         RAY
          God, this place is so beautiful.
          The grass is so green you can almost smell it. Looking
          around the old ballpark, they see only about twenty or
          thirty die-hard fans in the stands for batting practice;
          a half-dozen players are grouped around the batting cage
          as one player hits to several others in the field. A few
          sportswriters and other civilians stand near the dugouts.
          Ray and Mann stop at the first row, right behind the Red
          Sox on-deck circle, lean on the railing and talk.

                         RAY
          It could be 1912 out there, for all this
          place has changed. Babe Ruth stood on
          that very mound as a pitcher long before
          anyone knew he could hit home runs.
          Same mound.

                         MANN
          Why are we here, Ray?

                         RAY
          Something.. about the game.

                         CUT TO

          93 THE GAME - NIGHT

                         93
          The game is in progress. Ray and Mann are in their fifth
          row seats. They do not speak.
          At one point, Ray becomes suddenly and strangely aware that
          something is about to happen. He looks at Mann who is just
          watching the game. Then he looks at the scoreboard.

                         94 THE SCOREBOARD 94
          Fenway Park has a sophisticated scoreboard that flashes
          pictures of the batter and pitcher, and can show instant
          replays of some of the action.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         65

                         94 CONTINUED

                         94
          Right now, the display is replaced by an oddly glowing
          message. The sounds of the stadium, the game, and the
          crowd fade out.
          There is only the message:

          ARCHIBALD "MOONLIGHT" GRAHAM
          Chisholm, Minn.
          New York Giants

                         LIFETIME STATISTICS:
          1 Game, 0 At Bats
          The message does not just glow, it pulsates. It looks
          almost otherworldly, phosphorescent; clearly unlike
          anything ever seen before on a ballpark scoreboard.

          95 RAY AND MANN

                         95
          Ray looks around him. The sounds of the game return, and
          from the unconcerned faces of the people near him, he
          realizes that no one else can see the message. He opens
          his program and starts writing it down. Mann notices this,
          but cannot see what Ray is writing.
          Then Ray hears The Voice.

                         THE VOICE
          'Go the distance.'

                         RAY
          Oh my God.

                         MANN
          What's the matter?

                         RAY
          Nothing.

                         MANN
          You okay?
          Ray sighs.

                         RAY
          Yeah.

                         ;THEN)
          Whenever you wanttogo,wecan go.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         66

                         95 CONTINUED

                         95

                         MANN
          What???

                         RAY
          If you want to go, we can go.
          Mann looks at Ray curiously, trying to read this new
          attitude.

                         MANN
          Then let's go.
          Mann rises and heads up the aisle. Ray looks down at the
          program -- at the handwritten legend of Moonlight Graham,
          who played one game fifty-seven years ago, but did not get
          to bat -- and follows Mann out of the ballpark.

                         CUT TO

          96 THE RIDE BACK TO BOSTON 96
          It is nighttime, and Mann drives. Ray slumps, dozing,
          troubled. Mann looks curiously at Ray, but says nothing.
          They ride in silence.

                         CUT TO

          97 MANN'S STREET - NIGHT

                         97
          The street is blue with moonlight as they park in front of
          the storefront.

                         MANN
          Where are you goingfrom here?

                         RAY
          Home.

                         MANN
          What is it you're not telling me?

                         RAY
          (shakes head no)
          I've taken up too much of your time.
          Mann gets out of the car.

                         MANN
          I wish I had your passion, Ray. However
          misdirected it may be, it's still a
          passion. I used to feel that way about
          things, but...

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         67

                         97 CONTINUED

                         97
          Ray slides into the driver's seat.

                         MANN
          You got another message, didn't you?

                         RAY
          You'll think I'm crazy.

                         MANN
          I already think you're crazy. What did
          it say?
          After a little thought, Ray smiles sadly.

                         RAY
          It said 'The man's done enough. Leave
          him alone.'
          Ray puts the car in gear, makes a wide turn, and starts to
          head back up the street. But he stops short when Mann's
          form looks out of the darkness into the glare of the
          headlights..
          Ray does not know why Mann is blocking his path. Or why
          he appears tense, almost frightened.

                         MANN
          'Moonlight' Graham.
          Ray's jaw drops.

                         RAY
          You saw it.

                         MANN
          Saw what?

                         RAY
          New York Giants, 1922. He played one
          game, never got to bat.
          Mann looks spectrial in the high-contrast glare on the
          headlights.

          MANN.
          What did I see, Ray?

                         RAY
          Chisholm, Minnesota. We were the only
          ones who saw it. Did you hear the
          voice, too?
          Mann glances at Ray, then looks away.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         68

                         97 CONTINUED (2) 97

                         RAY
          It's all right to admit it. That's what
          told me to find you.
          No response.

                         RAY
          Did you hear it too?

                         MANN
          'Go the distance.'

                         RAY
          Do you know what it means?

                         MANN
          Yes.

                         RAY
          What.

                         MANN
          It means...we're going to Minnesota to
          find Moonlight Graham.

                         RAY

                         (THRILLED)
          We?

                         MANN
          Yeah.

                         RAY
          What do we do when we find him?

                         MANN
          We'll know that when we find him.
          Ray opens the passenger door of the Datsun and Mann jumps
          in. Ray releases the brake and peels out, burning rubber.
          The two men look happy as kids with bats over shoulders,
          gloves dangling, on their way to a sandlot.

                         CUT TO

          98 ON THE ROAD

                         98
          Once on 1-90, they begin the long haul across the Great
          Lakes states. Ray drives, Mann dozes in the reclined
          passenger seat.

          RAY (V.O.)
          Annie, I'm really sorry, but I'm going
          to be a few days longer.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         69

                         98 CONTINUED

                         98

          ANNIE (V.0.)

                         (PHONE; FILTERED)
          Oh, Ray...Is everything all right?

          RAY (V.0.)
          Everything's great, and'I'll tell you
          all about it when I get back, but I'm
          going to Minnesota now.

          99 MORE ON THE ROAD 99
          Now Mann drives, and Ray tries to sleep, his stockinged
          feet propped up on the dash, occasionally sliding with a
          thud against the steering column.

          ANNIE (V.O.)

                         (PHONE; FILTERED)
          I don't believe this. What's in
          Minnesota?

          RAY (V. 0.)
          An old ballplayer. I'll explain when
          I get home. How are things with you?

                         100 GAS STATION

                         100
          Ray is using the pay phone on the wall of the office, while
          the car is being gassed.

          ANNIE (V.0.)

                         (PHONE; FILTERED)
          Uh, fine.

                         RAY
          Hey, guess what? Terence Mann is with
          me. We're going to Minnesota together.

          ANNIE (V.0.)

                         (PHONE; FILTERED)
          Are you kidding me? Oh, Ray, that's
          unbelievable!

                         RAY
          I know. I gotta go. Hug Karin for me.
          I love you.

          ANNIE (V.O.)

                         (PHONE; FILTERED)
          I love you too. You guys behave
          yourselves. Hurry home.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         70

                         100 CONTINUED

                         100
          Ray smiles and hangs up.

                         CUT TO

                         101 ANNIE'S KITCHEN

                         101
          She hangs up, and loses her smile as she turns back to the
          kitchen table, where her brother Mark sits with two men in
          business suits.

                         MARK
          Why didn't you tell him?

                         ANNIE
          For the same reason I've never pissed
          on your birthday cake.

                         MARK
          Annie, you don't have a choice in the
          matter.
          Annie looks vertroubldye.

                         CUT TO

          102 ON THE ROAD - MINNESOTA

                         -02 1
          They are north of Duluth,andthelandscape hasgrown
          harsher, the trees shorterandmore gnarled, thegrass
          tougher and wirier.
          After Virginia, Minnesota, all the land is scarred. Above
          the town the mines sit like sand-colored bunkers in the
          cliffs,- stern and silent.
          Near Chisholm, the land is getting ever weirder. It looks
          like a pasture rooted and rerooted by giant hogs. It has
          been split and gutted; greenery has grown back, but at
          weird and unnatural angles.
          But as they swing into town; the highway divides and they
          cross a beautiful and tranquil lake, so smooth and shiny
          it might be a scene painted on a glass plate. A sign reads

          WELCOME TO CHISHOLM.

          103 CHISHOLM, MINNESOTA

                         103
          Ray and Mann have parked on the main street next to a
          corner phone booth. Ray is flipping through the thin phone
          book attached to the booth by a chain.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         71

                         103 CONTINUED

                          103

                          RAY
          Half a dozen Grahams...no Archibald, no
          Moonlight.

                         MANN
          Follow me.

                         CUT TO

          104 EXT. CHISHOLM FREE PRESS


                         104
          The local newspaper is located in a small storefront that
          was probably once a confectioners or a dry-goods store.

          105 INT. CHISHOLM FREE PRESS


                         105
          Ray and Mann are talking with the paper's publisher, Veda
          Ponikvar, a handsome woman in her sixties, with a sweet,
          innocent smile, and eyeglasses hanging from a fine chain
          around her neck.

                         MANN
          We're trying to find an ex-baseball
          player named Archibald Graham.

                         VEDA
          You mean 'Doc' Graham.

                         RAY
          No, I think his nickname was
          'Moonlight.'

                         VEDA
          Yes, that's Doctor Graham.

                         MANN
          Doctor Graham.
          This is interesting news to Ray and Mann.

                         VEDA
          His baseball career never amounted to
          much, so he went back to school. His
          father was a doctor.

                         MANN
          Do you know where we can find him?

                         RAY
          It's nothing bad. We're not from the
          IRS, or anything ---

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         72

                         105 CONTINUED 105

                         VEDA
          Doc Graham is dead. He died in 1972.
          Ray and Mann look at each other, unsure of what this means
          to their quest.

                         CUT TO

          106 NEWSPAPER BACK ROOM 106
          Ray and Mann sit at a table in the newspaper's back room,
          the "morgue" file on Doc Graham -- a collection of
          clippings, pictures, and the obituary -- strewn before
          them.
          Right now, their attention is on Veda, who has put her
          glasses on, and is reading from an editorial.

                         VEDA
          .'And there were times when children
          could not afford eyeglasses or milk, or
          clothing. Yet no child was ever denied
          these essentials, because in the
          background, there was always Doctor
          Graham. Without any fanfare or
          publicity, the glasses or the milk or
          the ticket to the ball game found their
          way into the child's pocket.'

                         MANN
          You wrote that.

                         VEDA
          The day he died.

                         MANN
          You're a good writer.
          The compliment is just right, and she smiles warmly.

                         VEDA
          Excuse me.
          She exits. Mann spreads out the clippings and shakes his
          head.

                         MANN
          Something's missing.
          Ray is looking at a photo of Doc Graham as a man in his
          late sixties.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         MANN
          Half the towns in North America has a
          Doc Graham. What makes this one so
          special we have to come halfway across
          the country to find him fifteen years
          after he died? There's got to be more.
          Veda enters with a piece of paper from a yellow legal pad.

                         VEDA
          You might want to talk to some of these
          people. They knew Doc pretty well.
           Mann takes the list and looks it over.

                          CUT TO

                         107 INTERVIEW 07
          Two old Codgers on a park bench.

                         FIRST CODGER
          Oh, that man had an arm on him. One day
          over at the ballpark, he said 'Lemme see
          that ball', and one of the boys threw
          him the ball, and he walked over behind
          home plate, reared back, and fired that
          ball over the left field fence.

                         SECOND CODGER
          And he was at least fifty years old when
          he did it.

                         FIRST CODGER
          It was still rising when it disappeared.

                         108 INTERVIEW
          A woman, an older Nurse.

                         NURSE
          i went with him to make a housecall at
          one of the camps. .mining camps. The
          husband was sick, and they had no stove,
          so they had no heat.

                         (MORE)

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         74

                         108 CONTINUED

                          NURSE (CONT'D)
          When we got back to Chisholm, Doc went
          to the hardware store and bought a stove
          for them and paid to have it delivered.
          And I know that wasn't the only time he
          did something like that.

          109 COUNTRY KITCHEN RESTAURANT - DAY 109
          Several tables have been pushed together, and Mann sits
          surrounded by townspeople, mostly men past retirement age.

                         BALDING MAN
          He didn't smoke or drink, .but he used
          to chew up paper and spit it out
          wherever he went. If you were around
          Doc very long, you learned to duck.

                         MOUSTACHED MAN
          He'd even chew up his prescription
          slips, so sometimes we'd have to dig
          into our pockets for a piece of paper
          so Doc could write us prescriptions.

                         WHITE-HAIRED MAN
          He always wore a black overcoat, even
          in the summer, and it was always
          flapping open, even in the winter and
          it was fifty below. And he had white
          hair, like me, and he always carried an
          umbrella.

                         SMOKER
          'Cept he was always, I mean always,
          losing them. Stores 'round town would
          just lean his umbrella somewhere near
          the door, and if anybody asked, they'd
          just say 'Oh, that's Doc's umbrella'.

                         MANN
          What was the umbrella for?

                         WHITE-HAIRED MAN
          Oh, I think it got to be a habit,
          something to hang onto. But if you'd
          ask him, he'd say it was to beat away
          all his lady admirers.
          This, as much as the other remembrances, brings warm
          chuckles to the old men.

                         MANN
          Tell me about his wife.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         75

                         109 CONTINUED

                         BALDING MAN
          Alicia. She moved to South Carolina
          after he passed. She passed a few years
          later. She always wore blue. I bet you
          didn't know that.

                         MANN

                         (SMILES)
          No. I didn't.

          110 MOTEL OFFICE - NIGHT

                         110
          The woman Manager of the motel is having a'cup of coffee
          with Ray.

                         MOTEL MANAGER
          You know, everybody's talking about you
          two. Our neighbors came over last night
          and we just told Doc'Graham stories
          until after midnight. I even wrote some
          of them down.
          She takes out a piece of paper.

                         RAY
          That's very nice of you.

                         MOTEL MANAGER
          Well, it's funny. It's like all these
          memories we have of Doc had gone to
          sleep and sunk way down inside us. But
          once you started asking about him, and
          started us talking about him, why they
          swum back up to the surface again.
          Ray smiles.

                         CUT TO

                         111 MOTEL ROOM

                         111
          Ray and Mann are sitting in their beds, comparing their
          notes.

                         MANN
          No screwing, no drinking, no opium, no
          illegitimate children. No-midnight
          abortions, no shady finances.
          Ray puts down his notes and picks up the Chicago Tribune.

                         RAY
          You sound disappointed.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         76

                         111 CONTINUED

                         111

                         MANN
          Shoeless Joe had a problem. That's why
          he needed you. This guy doesn't need
          us.
          Suddenly, Ray straightens with a start.

                         RAY
          Oh, My God.
          Ray hurries over to Mann, offering the opened newspaper,
          and points out an article to Mann. It is headlined:

          TERENCE MANN MISSING.

                         MANN
          Damn.

                         (READS)
          'His son, who lives in New York City,
          notified police after receiving no
          answer to repeated telephone calls...'
          Shit. I'd better call him.
          He pulls the phone onto the bed and dials

                         MANN
          What the hell do I tell him.

                         RAY
          You want me to...?
          He motions outside with his head.

                         MANN
          Thanks.
          Ray exits.

                         CUT TO

          112 EXT. CHISHOLM RESIDENTIAL STREET - NIGHT 112

          Ray walks by the old movie theatre, which sits at the edge
          of a residential street. The Godfather is playing. He
          nods at an elderly man who passes him on the street. He
          passes a darkened house and notices there is a sign of some
          kind in its unlit front window. He takes another two or
          three steps before he has, to stop to take a better look at
          the sign.

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         77

                         113 THE SIGN

                         113
          It takes a second to make out the image in the dark, but
          it is a head shot of Richard Nixon. Above, it says "Four
          More Years". Below, it reads "Re-Elect The President".

                         114 RAY

          1.14
          is puzzled. He turns and looks at the theatre marquee.

          115 THE THEATRE MARQUEE

                          115
           Under the letters that spell out "The Godfather", are
           smaller letters that read "Nominated for 10 Academy
           Awards".

                         116 RAY

                         116
          frowns. He says the word to himself.

                         RAY
          Nominated?
          Ray now looks at the car parked nearest to him.

                         117 THE CAR

           : . 17
           It is an old Mustang. The annual tag on the license plate
           reads: 1972.

                         118 ?? RAY

                         118

                         LOOKS-AROUND

          119 HIS POINT OF VIEW

                         119
          All the cars on the street are pre-1972. And still walking
          down the block away from him, is the elderly man Ray passed
          moments earlier.
          The man is about sixty-five years old, stooped a little,
          but the body is still lithe, an athlete's body. He is
          wearing a dark overcoat...

          120 CLOSER POINT OF VIEW

                         120
          .and he carries an umbrella.

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         78

                         121 RAY 121
          The little hairs on the back of Ray's neck stand up. His
          mouth is dry, and for a moment, he cannot speak. Then, he
          calls to the man.

                         RAY
          Doctor Graham?
          Slowly, the man stops and turns back to face Ray. Ray
          starts to trot to him.

                         ELDERLY MAN
          Who's that?

                         RAY
          My name is Ray Kinsella. I'm from Iowa.
          Are you Moonlight Graham?
          The old man narrows his bright eyes to see Ray more
          clearly.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          No one's called me 'Moonlight' Graham
          for fifty years.

                         RAY
          Well, I've come...

                         (SMILES TO

                         HIMSELF)
          . a very long way to see you.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          Funny. I couldn't sleep tonight.
          Usually, I sleep like a baby. So I told
          Alicia I was going to take a walk.

                         RAY
          Mind if i join you? I'd like to talk
          to you.
          Doc nods and they start to walk.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          Let's go to the high school. We can sit
          in my office. What do. you want to talk
          about?

                         RAY
          Well, first of all, how'd you get to be
          called 'Moonlight'?

                         DOC GRAHAM
          'Cause of a night like this, long ago.
          I'd just gotten to the minors, and I
          went out to the ballpark.

                         (MORE)

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         79

                         121 CONTINUED
           DOC GRAHAM (Cont'd}
          There's nothing as peaceful as a
          ballpark at night. Like a church.

                         RAY
          Yeah, I know what you mean.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          Anyway, I fell asleep. Next morning,
          they found me in the on-deck circle, all
          curled up like a baby. Someone called
          me 'Moonlight,' and it stuck.

          122 EXT. HIGH SCHOOL 122

          Doc fumbles out a key, and lets them in.

                         RAY
          When you got to the majors, you played
          only one inning of one game. What
          happened in that inning?

          123 INT. HIGH SCHOOL 123

          They enter the hallway of the old school, the smell of
          varnish and chalk almost palpable.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          It was the last day of the season.
          Bottom of the eighth, and we were way
          ahead. I'd been up with the club for
          most of a month, but hadn't seen any
          action. Just then old John McGraw
          points a bony finger at me and says
          'Right field.' Well sir, I jumped up
          like I was sitting on a spring, grabbed
          my glove, and ran out onto the field.
          They reach a varnished door with an opaque glass inset, and
          enter. Doc Graham's office.

          124 INT.,DOC GRAHAM'S OFFICE 124

          Doc seats himself behind a cluttered desk, and motions Ray
          to the black-leather sofa a few feet away.

                         RAY
          Did you get to make a play?
          Doc takes a sheet of paper off his desk, expertly rips an
          inch or so off the corner with his teeth, and begins
          chewing.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         80

                         124 CONTINUED 124

                         DOC GRAHAM
          Nope. They never hit the ball out of
          the infield.
          Ray chuckles, but then flinches as Doc shoots his little
          spitball towards him.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          Heads up.
          It hits the back of the sofa a few feet from Ray, and hangs
          there, like a white fly.

                         RAY
          I was warned about you.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          Anyway, one inning later the game was
          over, and so was I.

                         RAY
          And what was that like?

                         DOC GRAHAM
          It was like coming this close to your
          dreams, and then watching them brush
          past you like a stranger in a crowd.
          Ray nods, and a look of understanding begins to appear on
          his face. He looks out the window, focused on faraway.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          Except, at the time, you don't think
          much of it. Hardly anybody recognizes
          the most significant moment of their
          life when they're happening. Back then
          I just figured there'd be plenty more
          days. I didn't know that would be the
          only one.
          Doc Graham notices that Ray is looking very serious.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          Now, let me ask you a question, Ray
          Kinsella. What makes that half-inning
          so interesting that you come all the way
          from Iowa to ask me about it sixty-five
          years later?
          Ray chooses his words carefully.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         81

                         124 CONTINUED (2) 124

                         RAY
          I didn't really know till just now. But
          I think it's to ask you if you could do
          anything you wanted to...if you could
          have a wish...

                         DOC GRAHAM
          Ahh...
          Doc nods. his understanding. He smiles wryly, takes a new
          piece of paper, and bites off a little section.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          And are you the kind of man who could
          grant me that wish?

                         RAY
          I don't know. I'm just asking...
          Doc leans his left elbow on the desk and rubs his forehead
          thoughtfully with a palm, as if it were an eraser that
          could erase the years and take him back to 1929 and the
          Polo Grounds in New York.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          I never got to bat in the major leagues.
          I'd have liked the chance -- just once
          -- to stare down a big league pitcher.
          Stare him down and then just as he goes
          into the windup -- wink! Make him
          wonder if I know something he doesn't.
          That's what I wish for. The chance to
          squint my eyes when the sky is so blue
          it hurts to look at it, and to feel the
          'tingle that runs up your arms when you
          connect dead-on. The chance to run the
          bases, stretch a double to a triple, and
          flop race-first into third, wrapping my
          arm around the bag. That's my wish, Ray
          Kinsella... that's my wish.
          Ray begins to smile. Graham is staring intently at him.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          Is there enough magic floating around
          in the night out there for you to make
          that wish come true?

                         RAY
          What would you do if I said 'Yes'?

                         DOC GRAHAM
          I think I might actually believe you.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         82

                         124 CONTINUED (3)

                         RAY
          There is a place where things like that
          happen. And if you want to go there,
          I can take you.
          Doc's eyes start to glisten, and he offers an embarrassed
          smile as he wipes away a tear.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          If it means leaving Chisholm...
          He shakes his head.no. Ray is surprised.

                         RAY
          I understand, but I think you're
          supposed to come with us.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          This is my most special place in the
          world, Ray. Once a place touches you
          like this, the wind never blows so cold
          again. You feel for it like it was your
          child. I can't leave here.
          Ray cannot believe the man won't leave Chisholm for his
          dream.

                         RAY
          But your wish...

                         DOC GRAHAM
          It'll stay one. I was born here, lived
          here, and I'll die here. That's okay.
          I'll have no regrets.

                         RAY
          But sixty-five years ago -- for five
          minutes -- you came this close.
          (holds up two

                         FINGERS)
          It would kill some men to get that close
          to their dream and never touch it.
          They'd consider it a tragedy.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          Son...if I'd only gotten to be a doctor
          for five minutes. .now that would have
          been a tragedy.
          Those words fill up the room, and Ray sinks back against
          the couch.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         83

                         124 CONTINUED (4)

                         124

                         DOC GRAHAM
          Well, I'd better get home before Alicia
          starts to thinking I've got a
          girlfriend.
          And Doc Graham smiles at him.

          RAY (V.0.)
          And he smiled.

                         CUT TO

          125 INT. MOTEL ROOM - NIGHT 125

          It is later that same night, and Ray has been recounting
          his experience with Doc Graham to Mann, who appears quietly
          troubled.

                         RAY
          And then I figured maybe we're not
          supposed to take him with us. So now
          I don't know why the hell we were
          supposed to come here.

                         MANN
          Maybe it was to find out if one inning
          can change the world.

                         RAY
          Did it?

                         MANN
          It did for these people. If he'd gotten
          a hit, he might've stayed there.

                         (THEN)
          Your wife called before. She wants you
          to call her tonight.

                         CUT TO

          126 INT.RAY AND ANNIE'S BEDROOM - NIGHT 126

          Annie is asleep. The phone rings, and the speed with which
          she picks it up suggests that her anxiety to get this phone
          call prevented her from sleeping very deeply.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         84

                         126 CONTINUED 126

                         ANNIE
          Ray.

                         (PAUSE)
          I asked the bank if we could miss a
          payment or two, and they told me they'd
          just sold the note on the farm to Mark
          and his partners. So they own the
          paper now, and he says if we don't sell
          to them, they'll foreclose. Ray, we
          don't have the money.

          127 INT. MOTEL ROOM - NIGHT 127

          Ray holds the phone, pained.

                         RAY
          Okay, look. They can't foreclose for
          thirty days, or something like that.
          I've got to take Terry back to Boston
          first, so it'll be ---

                         MANN
          No.
          Ray looks over at Mann.

                         MANN
          I'm going to Iowa with you.

                         RAY
          We're coming home.-

                         CUT TO

          128 ON THE ROAD - MORNING 128
          Ray drives with purpose and speed. Mann looks relaxed.

                         MANN
          Hell, I couldn't quit now. I've got
          see this ballpark.

                         RAY
          Not everybody can see it. You might
          not.

                         MANN
          I'll give it a try.
          As they turn onto the highway near the lake, a Teenager
          with a dufflebag appears on the side of the road, his arm
          raised in. a hitchhiker's stance. Ray pulls the car over
          to the side of the road.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         85

          ---128 - - - CONTINUED

                         128

                         RAY
          I need all the karma I can get right
          now.
          The car stops, and the Teenager runs for it. He tosses his
          dufflebag in the backseat and squeezes in after it.

                         TEENAGER
          Thanks. You're the first car by. I
          didn't expect to get a lift so soon.
          Ray starts the car back onto the highway.

                         RAY
          How far are you going?

                         TEENAGER
          How far are you going?

                         RAY
          Iowa.

                         TEENAGER
          Well, if it's okay with you, I'll ride
          along for a while. I play baseball.
          Ray and Mann exchange brief smiles.

                         TEENAGER
          I'm looking for a place to play, and I
          heard that all through the Midwest,
          towns have teams, and in some places
          they'll find you a day job so you can
          play ball nights and weekends.

                         RAY
          This is your lucky day, kid. We're
          going someplace kind of like that.

                         TEENAGER
          All right!

                         RAY
          I'm Ray Kinsella, this is Terry Mann.

                         TEENAGER
          Hi. I'm Archie Graham.
          Mann and Ray just look at each other.
          And the little Datsun heads off down the highway.

                         CUT TO

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         86

          129 INT. CAR - NIGHT

          Archie sleeps in the backseat.

                         MANN
          I'm dying to ask him if he has a
          nickname.

                         RAY
          Don't. He didn't get it till he was in
          the minors.

                         MANN
          Maybe we can give it to him.

                         RAY
          Funny, the way he described towns,
          finding you a job so you can play on
          their team...they haven't done that for
          years. My Dad did that for a while.
          But that was in the Twenties.

                         MANN
          What happened to your father?

                         RAY
          He never made it as ball player, so he
          tried to get his son to make it for him.
          By the time I was ten, playing baseball
          got to be like eating vegetables or
          taking out the garbage, so when I was
          fourteen, I started to refuse. Can you
          believe that? An American boy refusing
          to have a catch with his father.

                         MANN
          Why at fourteen?

                         RAY
          That's when I read The Boat Rocker, by
          Terence Mann.

                         MANN
          Oh God.

                         RAY
          I never played catch with him again.

                         MANN

                         (SERIOUSLY)
          See, that's the kind of crap people are
          always trying to lay on me. It's not
          my fault you wouldn't play catch with
          your father!

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         87

                         129 CONTINUED

                         129

                         RAY
          I know. Anyway, when I was seventeen,
          we had a big fight, I packed my things,
          said something awful, and left. After
          a while I wanted to come home, but I
          didn't know how. I made it back for the
          funeral.

                         MANN
          What was the awful thing you said?

                         RAY
          I said I could never respect a man whose
          hero was a criminal.

                         MANN
          Who was his hero?

                         RAY
          Shoeless Joe Jackson.
          Mann considers this all very carefully.

                         MANN
          You knew he wasn't a criminal.
          Ray nods.

                         MANN
          Then why'd you say it?

                         RAY
          I was seventeen.
          Mann nods with growing understanding.

                         MANN
          So this is your penance.

                         RAY
          I know. I can't bring my father
          back..

                         MANN
          .so the least you can do is bring back
          his hero.
          Ray nods.

                         MANN
          Well now we know what everybody's
          purpose here is...except mine.
          Ray looks at him. He hadn't thought of that. After a few
          moments Ray points to something in the distance.

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         88

          130 POINT OF VIEW

                         130
          Something down the road, in the midst of all this flat
          farmland, is glowing in the night.
          It is an illuminated baseball diamond in a cornfield.

          131 RAY AND ANNIE'S FARM - NIGHT
          Ray turns the Datsun into the long driveway and, with a
          rumble, crosses the metal cattle guard that keeps livestock
          from escaping to the roadway.
          He eases the car to a stop in front of the house, and as
          the three men unfold themselves from the car, Karin bolts
          from the back door of the house, a blur of white blouse and
          pink pedal pushers. She flings herself into Ray's arms,
          and hugs his neck in unrestrained joy.

                         KARIN
          Daddy!
          Then Annie appears too. They kiss while Mann and Archie
          wait to be introduced. Finally, Mann clears his throat.

                         RAY

                         ( (BEAMING)
          Karin, Annie... This is Terence Mann

                         MANN
          Terry.

                         KARIN
          Hiya Terry.
          Annie steps forward, wining some curls from her eyes with
          ahand that has recently been immersed in flour'. She
          smiles, wipes the hand on the thigh of her jeans, and
          shakes his hand.

                         ANNIE
          Welcome.

                         MANN
          Thank you.

                         RAY
          And this young fellow is Moon -- uh,
          Archie Graham.
          Karin and Annie shake his hand.

                         RAY
          He's come to practice with the team.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         89

                         131 CONTINUED

                         131

                         ANNIE
          He'll be able to do more than just
          practice.

                         RAY
          What does that mean?

                         ANNIE
          Come on.
          They walk towards the field.

                         ANNIE
          Let's enjoy this place while we still
          have it.

          132 EXT. BASEBALL FIELD - NIGHT


                         132
          Ray and Annie walk silently with their arms around each
          other as they lead Mann, Archie and Karin to the bleachers.
          Mann's eyes widen as several of the players shout greetings
          to Ray.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Hi, Ray, welcome back.

                         RAY
          Thanks, Joe. Good to see you.

                         MANN
          Oh my Lord.

                         RAY
          What.

                         MANN
          That's Shoeless Joe Jackson!

                         RAY
          Well of course it is.

                         MANN
          I've seen pictures. Those are the White
          Sox!

                         RAY
          You mean you still didn't believe me?

                         MANN
          I thought I did, but... Oh my Lord.
          They have reached the foul line where Shoeless Joe waits
          for them.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         90

                         132 CONTINUED

                          1321

                          RAY
          Terry, I'd like you to meet Joe Jackson.
          Joe, this is Terry Mann.
          Mann and Jackson shake hands.

                         MANN
          It's a pleasure to meet you.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Pleasure's mine.

                         (TO RAY)
          Ray, I hope you don't mind, but we got
          tired of just having practices, so we
          brought another team out with us so we
          could have some real games.
          He points to the visitors' bench, and, indeed, there are
          a dozen or so more old-time baseball players in old-time
          baseball uniforms.

                         RAY
          I don't mind. Where'd they come from?

                         SHOELESS JOE

                         (CHUCKLES)
          Where'd we come from. Man, you wouldn't
          believe how many guys wanted to play
          here. We had to beat 'em off with a
          stick.

                         ARCHIE

                         (FROM THE

                         BLEACHERS)
          Hey, that's Mel Ott. And Carl Hubbell.
          Those are the New York Giants!

                         SHOELESS JOE
          With a couple of Cardinals and A's
          thrown in for good measure. Ty Cobb
          wanted to play, but none of us could
          stand the sonofabitch when we were
          alive, so we told him to stuff it.

                         (TO ARCHIE)
          Hey, are you Graham?

                         ARCHIE
          Yes sir.
          Ray and Mann are astonished that Shoeless Joe knows who
          Archie is.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         91

                         132 CONTINUED (2)

                         132

                         SHOELESS JOE
          What the hell you doing on the
          sidelines? You came here to play ball,
          didn't you?

                         ARCHIE
          Yes sir.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Go warm up!

                         ARCHIE

                         (THRILLED)
          Yes sir!
          Archie quickly scampers down the bleachers, onto the field,
          shakes Joe's hand, and runs to the dugout.

                         MANN
          Unbelievable.

                         RAY
          It's more than that. It's perfect.

                         CUT TO

                         133 THE GAME

                         133
          The White Sox are in the field, the Giants at bat. A Giant
          hitter bunts, and the runner on second takes third despite
          a close throw.
          Mann, Ray, Karin and Annie are in the stands, Mann keeping
          score.

                         MANN
          Does he get a hit for that?

                         RAY
          Karin?

                         KARIN
          Um, no. The batter was trying to
          sacrifice.

                         RAY
          So how do you score it?

                         KARIN
          Fielder's choice?

                         RAY
          Very good.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         92

                         133 CONTINUED

                         133
          Mann is impressed. He lifts Karin up from her seat on the
          row below them, and places her next to him to help him.

                         MANN
          You better sit here.
          Karin beams. Ray taps Mann and points to the plate.

                         RAY
          Look.
          Archie Graham -- now wearing a Giant's uniform -- drops one
          of the two bats he has been swinging in the on-deck circle,
          and advances on the plate, slashing the air with a
          brand-new bat the color of vanilla ice cream. He plants
          himself in the batter's b.ox, then cocks the bat, the top
          end of it trembling as if he were stirring something, and
          waits for the pitch.'
          The pitcher looks in for his signs. Archie stares back.
          As the pitcher goes into his windup, Archie winks at him.
          There is a moment of confusion and then anger on the
          pitcher's face, and when the ball speeds to the plate it
          is aimed right at Archie's head. He dives out of the way
          and hits the dirt hard. The Catcher chuckles through his
          mask.

                         CATCHER
          Good thing for you that wasn't his
          fastball.
          Archie digs in again at the plate, but backs up just a
          little. Now his look to the pitcher is one of
          determination.

                         ARCHIE
          Come on, let's see your fastball.
          The pitcher smiles, winds up and throws. Very fast. And
          right at Archie's chin. Again, he has to dive out of the
          way. This time, however, he gets right up and immediately
          appeals to the Umpire.

                         ARCHIE �
          Hey, ump, how about a warning?

                         UMPIRE
          Sure. Watch out-you don't get killed.
          Both benches laugh at that. Archie holds up his hands to
          call time, and steps out of the batter's box. The on-deck
          batter, Mel Ott, comes over.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         93

                         133 CONTINUED (2)

                         133

                         OTT
          Okay, kid, first two were high and
          tight, where do you think the next one's
          going to be?

                         ARCHIE
          Either-low and away, or in my ear.

                         OTT
          He don't want to load the bases. Look
          for low and away.
          Archie nods and starts to walk back to the plate.

                         OTT
          But watch out for 'in your ear.'
          Archie takes his place in the batter's box again. He still
          looks determined, but a little less cocky. The next pitch
          is a curve that looks as if it's heading right for him.
          But he holds his ground, and when the ball breaks down and
          away, he steps in, snaps the bat forward, and hits it.
          The ball sails in a high arc to right center. The center
          fielder backs up a couple of steps, lopes a few strides to
          his left, and makes the catch.
          Archie is out, but the runner on third tags up and scores.
          As Archie curls across the diamond from the first baseline
          to the Giants' bench, he hears cheering.
          In the stands, Ray, Annie, Karin and Mann are giving him
          a standing ovation. In return, he touches the brim of his
          cap, a ballplayer's cool response to adulation.

                         MANN

                         (LAUGHS)
          .Look at that. Mr. Cool.
          But when Archie gets to the bench, he can't contain himself
          anymore. He leaps up and lets out a cheer of pure joy.

                         DISSOLVE TO

          134 THE FIELD - LATER 134
          The game has ended, and players are rough-housing and
          joking as they slowly make their way to the door in the
          outfield fence. Ray and Mann are talking to some of the
          players over the fence.

                         MANN
          Where do you go when you walk through
          that door? What do you do?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         94

                         134 CONTINUED

                         CHICK GANDIL
          We sleep.

                         HAPPY FELSCH
          And wait.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          We dream.

                         RAY
          You can't leave the field any other way,
          can you?

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Not if we want to come back.

                         RAY
          I'd love to go with you sometime.
          The silence that follows is long and ominous.

                         RAY
          I'd like to see what's out there.
          There is still no response.

                         RAY
          I'll take that as a no for now.
          He spots Archie jogging off the field.

                         RAY
          Hey, slugger, congratulations!
          Archie jogs over.

                         ARCHIE
          Thanks. I can't stop shaking I'm so
          happy. 'Course, I would've liked a base
          hit...

                         KARIN
          But you got a RBI!

                         ARCHIE
          I sure did, didn't I?

                         SHOELESS JOE

                         (YELLS BACK)
          A rookie's luck!
          They all laugh at that.

                         RAY
          Well come on, this calls for a drink.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         95

                         134 CONTINUED (2)

                         134
          Archie hesitates.

                         ARCHIE
          I can't. I'm...
          He motions with his head toward the other players
          disappearing through the outfield door. Ray nods
          understandingly.

                         RAY
          Good game, Archie.

                         ARCHIE
          Thanks.

                         MANN
          Good night, kid.
          Ray, Karin, Annie and Mann watch Archie jog towards the
          rest of the players. When he reaches the fence, he turns
          back to them.

                         ARCHIE
          Mr. Kinsella?
          Ray turns toward him. Archie looks as if he knows more
          than he's saying.

                         ARCHIE
          Thank you for bringing me here. I
          couldn't have wished for anything more.
          Ray recognizes there may be more behind those words than
          just a teenager's pleasure. But he decides not to ask any
          questions.

                         RAY
          I know. You're welcome.
          Archie runs through the door in the fence and vanishes.

                         CUT TO

          135 INT. KITCHEN - MORNING


                         135
          Mann and Karin eat their country breakfasts at one and of
          the table, while at the other end, Annie and Ray sit in
          front of the bank books, ledgers, and the sheaf of bills
          puffed up around the paper spike.

                         ANNIE
          Once we fell behind in the payments, the
          full amount of the mortgage became due.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         96

                         135 CONTINUED

                          135

                          RAY
          And they own the paper, so they have the
          legal right to foreclose.

                         ANNIE
          Unless we sell.

                         RAY
          Either way we lose the farm. Maybe we
          can make it a condition of the sale that
          they keep the field up.

                         ANNIE
          Forget it. They're buying up single
          farms all around us, make it one big
          farm. First thing they'll do is plow
          under your field.
          Ray just sits there, letting that sink in.

                         CUT TO

          136 EXT. FARM - DAY


          1.36
          Ray and Mann walking.

                         MANN
          I don't have a lot of money, Ray, but
          maybe I could pitch in a little.

                         RAY
          Fine. You can put in twenty bucks for
          groceries.

                         MANN
          That's not what I meant. Maybe the
          reason you were supposed to find me was
          so I could help you with this.

                         RAY
          More likely it's that you're supposed
          to start writing again. About this.

                         MANN
          Don't change the subject.

                         RAY
          You promise to publish and I'll let you
          chip in from your royalties.
          Mann's expression suddenly turns to one of indignation.

                          CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         97

                         136 CONTINUED

                         136

                         MANN
          One thing has nothing to do with the
          other.

                         RAY
          I'm not sure I agree with that.

                         MANN
          You're not only stubborn, you're stupid.

                         RAY
          That I won't argue with.
          Annie emerges from the house and calls to Ray.

                         ANNIE
          Honey, that was Mark. He's coming
          tonight. He needs a decision tonight.

                         CUT TO

                         137 THE GAME

                         137
          Again, it's J,oe Jackson's Chicago White Sox against the New
          York Giants, now featuring rookie Archie Graham.
          In the stands, Mann keeps score, Karin munches on a hot
          dog, and Annie and Ray snuggle together to watch the game.

                         ANNIE
          Everything is so perfect here.

                         RAY
          Whatever I have to do to save this
          place, I'll do.

                         ANNIE
          I know.
          Suddenly, Ray snaps his head to the side, as one does to
          pick up a-distant sound.

                         RAY
          He's here.
          They look and see Mark's car heading up the gravel lane.
          He parks the car at the edge of the field, and the game
          stops as he walks right across it, completely mindless of
          the players. Since he doesn't see any of them, a few
          actually have to move out of his way. He approaches the
          bottom of the bleachers.

                         RAY
          You're interrupting the game, . Mark.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         98

                         137 CONTINUED

                         137
          Mark shakes his head sadly at the thought that these
          otherwise sensible relations have lost their minds.

                         MARK
          Ray, it's time'to put away our little
          fantasies and come down to earth.

                         RAY
          It's not a fantasy, Mark. They're real.
          Mark obviously do.esn't see anyone on the field.

                         MARK

                         (EMPHATICALLY)
          Who's real?

                         RAY
          Shoeless Joe Jackson. The White Sox.
          The Giants.

                         (TO MANN)
          He can't see any of it.

                         MARK
          And who's that? Babe Ruth?
          Ray smiles, savoring the moment.

                         RAY
          As a matter of fact, it's Terence Mann.

                         MARK
          Ah, how do you? I'm Michael Jackson.

                         (TO RAY)
          Ray, we have to settle this thing right
          now.

                         RAY
          I'm not selling you my home.

                         MARK
          You have no money, you've got a stack
          of bills to choke a pig, and come fall,
          you've got no crop to sell. But I have
          a deal to offer you that will allow you
          to stay on this land.
          This has Ray's attention. Mark climbs the bleachers to
          stand closer to him.

                         KARIN
          Daddy, we don't have to sell the farm.
          But no one pays her any attention. All eyes are on Mark.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         99

                         137 CONTINUED (2)

                         137

                         MARK
          Let us buy you out, and we'll leave the
          house. You can live in it rent free as
          long as you want.

                         RAY
          What about the baseball field?

                         MARK
          Do you realize what this land is worth?

                         RAY
          Over $2200 an acre.

                         MARK
          Then you must realize we cannot keep a
          useless baseball diamond in the middle
          of rich farmland.

                         RAY
          No deal, Mark. We're staying.

                         KARIN
          We don't have to go.

                         MARK

                         (EXPLODES)
          You're virtually bankrupt, and I'm
          offering you a way to keep your home
          because I love my sister! I've got
          partners who don't give a damn about
          you, and they're ready to foreclose
          right now!

                         KARIN
          Daddy, we don't have to sell the farm.

                         MARK
          Karin, please!

                         RAY
          Wait.
          They all turn to Karin.

                         KARIN
          People will come.

                         RAY
          What people, sweetheart?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         100

                         137 CONTINUED (3)

                         137

                         KARIN
          From all over. They'll just decide to
          take a vacation, see, and they'll come
          to Iowa City, and they'll think it's
          really boring, so they'll take a drive.
          And they'll drive down our road, and
          they'll see the lights and they'll think
          it's really pretty.
          Ray, Annie, and Mann listen with wonder, to this vision.

                         KARIN
          So, the people in the cars? They'll
          drive up and they'll want to pay us,
          like buying a ticket.
          Mark looks at them all as if they're crazy.

                         MARK
          You're not listening to this seriously,
          are you?

                         ANNIE
          Yes.

                         MARK
          Why would anybody pay money to come
          here?
          Karin looks at her Uncle mark as if he were a simpleton.

                         KARIN
          To watch the game. And it'll be just
          like when they were little kids a long
          time ago, and it was summertime, and
          they'll watch the game and .remember what
          it was like.
          Ray and Annie couldn't be prouder of their daughter than
          they are right now.

                         MARK
          What the hell is she talking about?

                         ANNIE
          She's talking about people seeing their
          memories... touching their past.

                         RAY

                         (NODS)
          People will come.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         101

                         137 CONTINUED (4)

                         137

                         ANNIE
          It'll be like one of those tiny, French
          restaurants that have no sign. You find
          it by instinct. They'll be drawn.

                         MARK
          Okay, this is all fascinating, but the
          fact remains that you don't have the
          money to bring the mortgage up to date,
          so you still have to sell. I'm sorry,
          but you have no choice.
          He produces a document and hands it to Ray with a pen. Ray
          looks at it. He doesn't know what to do.

                         MANN
          Ray...
          Ray looks at Mann.

                         138 MANN

          - 1.38
          speaks now as he has not spoken for many years: as Terence
          Mann, master of words, spellbinder.

                         MANN
          People will come, Ray. They'll come to
          Iowa for reasons they can't even fathom.
          They'll turn up your driveway, not
          knowing for sure why they're doing it,
          and arrive at your door, innocent as
          children, longing for the past. 'Of
          course we won't mind if you look
          around,' you'll say. 'It's only twenty
          dollars per person.' And they'll pass
          over the money without even looking at
          it. For it is money they have, and
          peace they lack.

                         139 MARK

                         139
          pushes the papers. forward.

                         MARK
          Just sign the papers, Ray.

                         140 MANN

                         140
          is not one to give up.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         102

                         140 CONTINUED

                         140

                         MANN
          They'll walk out to the bleachers and
          sit in shirtsleeves in the perfect
          evening, or they'll find they have
          reserved seats somewhere in the
          grandstand or along one of the baselines
          -- wherever they sat when they were
          children and cheered their heroes.
          They'll watch the game, and it will be
          as if they'd dipped themselves in magic
          waters. The memories will be so thick
          they'll have to brush them away from
          their faces.

                         141 MASTER

                         141
          Spellbound, Ray has put the papers down. Mark picks them
          up again. He is battling Mann for Ray's attention.

                         MARK
          Listen to me. Tomorrow morning, when
          the bank opens, they will foreclose.

                         MANN
          People will come, Ray.

                         MARK
          You're broke, Ray. Sell now or lose
          everything.

                         MANN
          The one constant through all the years,
          Ray, has been baseball. America has
          rolled by like an`army of steamrollers.
          It's been erased like a blackboard,
          rebuilt, and erased again. But baseball
          has marked the time. This field, this �
          game... it's a piece of our past. It
          reminds us of all that once was good.
          And that could be again. People will
          come. People will most definitely come.
          Mann has moved everyone (but Mark) with the beauty of his
          words, and the passion in his.voice. Behind him, the
          assembled ballplayers respectfully applaud.

                         BUCK WEAVER

                         (TEARY-EYED)
          That was beautiful...
          The other players nod, also teary-eyed.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         103

                         141 CONTINUED 141

                         BUCK WEAVER

                         (SINCERELY)
          .fuckin' beautiful.
          The players on either side of him jab his ribs with their
          elbows, but Mann, Ray and Annie laugh with pleasure.

                         MARK
          Ray. You will lose everything and you
          will be evicted.
          Ray looks at the paper with dread. He looks at Shoeless
          Joe and the players. He looks at his family. Then he
          turns back to Mark. It's decision time.

                         RAY
          I'm not signing.
          Mark shakes his head sadly. Annie hugs Ray. The players
          breathe a great sigh of relief. Mann smiles.

                         MANN
          Ray...
          Ray looks up at Mann, who, with a gentle tilt of the head,
          directs Ray's attention to the house. Ray looks behind him
          toward the house.

          142 RAY'S POINT OF VIEW - CARS 142
          have parked in front of the house. More are coming quietly
          down the driveway. Dozens of cars. Cars with out-of-state
          license plates.
          Some people,have gotten out of their cars and wait
          patiently. One or two families sit on their hoods, or have
          set up picnic dinners on their station wagons' tailgates.

                         143 THE BLEACHERS 143
           Ray, Annie, Karin and Mann are deeply happy -- but not
           terribly surprised -- to see these people.

                         RAY

                         (SING-SONG)
          They're he-re.
          Mark looks at the house and then back at Ray.

                         NARK
          Who's here?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         104

                         143 CONTINUED

                         143

                         RAY
          (with an edge)
          You don't see those cars? All those
          people?

                         MARK
          Don't do this, you son of a bitch!
          There's no cars, no people...

                         KARIN
          Uncle Mark, I can see them.

                         ANNIE
          We all can.

                         MARK
          You're crazy. You're all bat-shit
          crazy!

                         RAY
          Watch your language, Mark.

                         MARK
          You build a baseball field in the middle
          of nowhere, you sit around here and
          stare at nothing ---

                         KARIN
          It's not nothing.
          Mark grabs Karin's arm and pulls her to her feet as if she
          were "Exhibit A."

                         MARK
          And you've turned your daughter into a
          goddamn moron!

                         RAY
          Get your hands off her.
          Ray rises threateningly, and Mark turns toward him. In so
          doing, he twists little Karin off balance.

                         MARK
          I'm trying to help you, goddamnit!
          In that split second, they hear a strangled gasp, and see
          Karin falling forward from the top row of the bleachers.

                         RA Y
          Karin!!

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         105

                         144 KARIN

                         144
          Her hot dog flies off, the bun and wiener separating in
          midair. One small sandal bounces end over end and lands
          at the foot of the bleacher. It takes forever for her body
          to come down with a sickening thud on the hard green boards
          of one of the bottom rows.

                         145 THE OTHERS

                         145
          rush down to where she lies, face up. Ray is first, but
          he does not know what to do. Annie and Mann hover. Mark
          is horror-stricken, but no one knows what to do.

                         MARK
          Oh my God, I'm sorry...Annie...I didn't
          mean to...
          Karin is unconscious, and seems to be fighting for breath.
          Ray and Annie's eyes meet in anguish.

                         ANNIE
          Should we move her?

                         RAY
          Get the car.

                         146 ANNIE

                         146
          springs for the house. The tourists by their cars watch
          quietly.

                         ANNIE
          Is there a doctor? A nurse? Any of
          you?
          They sadly shake their heads no. Annie races inside.

          147 BACK AT THE BLEACHERS

                         147
          Most of the White Sox players stand by the left field
          fence, staring silently.

                         MANN
          How long?

                         RA Y
          Its a twenty-minute drive.
          Mann winces. He knows that could be fatal. Ray kneels by
          Karin. Her nose and one side of her face have been scraped
          by the fall. Blood starts to trickle from her nose, across
          her cheek and down her neck. She is becoming bluer and her
          cough is faint, as though she is in another room.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         106

                         147 CONTINUED

                         147
          Mark takes off his $300 pale-green velvet corduroy jacket
          and is wordlessly holding it out to Ray. Ray takes the
          jacket and covers Karin gently.
          Karin is getting paler, bluer, and her breathing more
          strained and distant.

                         RAY
          Karin...
          Then, without reason, Ray slowly turns toward the field.
          The White Sox stand near him by the fence, the Giants stay
          around their bench. All except one: young Archie Graham.

                         148 ARCHIE GRAHAM

                         148
          has noticed the'commotion in the bleachers, and he starts
          to lope across the field.

                         149 BLEACHERS

                         149
          Annie has pulled the car over and honks. Ray holds up his
          hand to her to wait. His eyes are on young Archie Graham.

          150 YOUNG ARCHIE GRAHAM

           3.50
           As Graham gets closer, his features begin to change, and
           his step slows. He reaches the end of the fence -- around
           which no player can pass
          -- and when he emerges from the
          shadows on the bleachers side, he is no longer young
          Moonlight Graham, the ballplayer of long ago...but Doc
          Graham, the old man from Chisholm, Minnesota. His baseball
          glove has turned into a black doctor's bag.

                         151 THE BLEACHERS

                         151
          as Doc Graham approaches.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          What have we got here?

                         RAY
          She fell.
          Doc kneels beside her and instantly knows what is wrong.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          This child's choking to death.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         107

                         151 CONTINUED

                         151
          He picks her up with one hand under her shoulders and the
          other under her knees, seats himself on the bleachers, and
          turns her face down. Supporting her chest with one hand,
          he delivers a series of sharp blows between her shoulder
          blades with the heel of his other hand.
          Annie honks again. Ray waves her to him. Mark cannot
          believe what he is seeing.
          Suddenly, Karin's diaphragm expands as she sucks in air.
          Doc reaches around and pries her mouth open, releasing a
          sizable piece of hog dog and bun.
          As he turns her over, we can see the blueness disappearing
          from her face as she continues to breathe deeply. Doc
          peels back each eyelid in turn, stares at the pupil for a
          few seconds, and lets the eye close.

                         DCC GRAHAM
          She's okay. I don't think the fall
          really hurt her, just the dog in her
          throat. She'll be coming around in a
          minute or two.

                         RAY

                         (SIGHS DEEPLY)
          Thank you, Doc.
          Doc looks deeply into Ray's eyes.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          No, son. Thank you.
          It just now sinking for Ray what-Doc Graham has sacrificed
          to save the child. Ray looks to the field, and then back
          at the Doctor.

                         RAY
          'Oh, my God, you can't go back.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          It's okay...

                         (NODS KNOWINGLY)
          It's okay.

          152 MARK AND ANNIE

                         152
          Mark is slack-jawed. He has seen something magical happen
          and cannot explain it.

                         MARK
          I saw...A11 of a sudden this kid runs
          off the field and turns.into...

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         108

                         152 CONTINUED

                         152
          He looks questioningly at Annie. She smiles reassuringly.

                         ANNIE
          There's hope for you yet, Mark.

          153 RAY AND DOC GRAHAM

                         153
          Doc Graham stands, and picks up his black bag.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          Well, I best be getting back home before
          Alicia starts to thinking I've got a
          girlfriend.
          He walks around the edge of the fence, and heads for the
          outfield door. The players respectfully make way for him.

                         HAPPY FELSCH
          Good work, Doc.

                         EDDIE CICOTTE
          Way to go, Doc.

                         DOC GRAHAM
          Thanks, boys. Win one for me, someday,
          will you?
          He passes them.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Hev rookie!
          Doc Graham turns.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          You were good.
          Only now do Doc Graham's eyes shine with tears. He smiles,
          and disappears through the door.

          154 ON THE SIDE

                         154
          Karin is coming to, Ray and Annie by her side. Some of the
          players start to gather up their equipment. Shoeless Joe
          calls to Ray.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          We're gonna call it a night. We'll see
          you tomorrow.

                         RAY
          Okay.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         109

                         154 CONTINUED

                          154

                          MANN
           Good night.
           Joe starts to trot off the field, then he stops and turns
           back to the bleachers.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Hey! You wanna come with us?
          Ray's jaw drops.

                         RAY
          You mean it?

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Not you.
          (points to Mann)
          Him.

                         RAY
          Him?

                         MANN
          Come with you?

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Out there.

                         MANN
          What is out there?

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Come find out.

                         RAY
          Wait a second. Why him?
          Shoeless Joe and the other players wait for Mann to join
          them, ignoring Ray's question.

                         RAY
          I built this field! You wouldn't be
          here if it weren't for me.

                         MANN
          Ray, for God's sake, I'm unattached.
          You've got a family.
          This takes Ray down a peg or two.

                         RAY
          But I want to know what's out there! I
          want to see it!

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         110

                         154 CONTINUED (2)

                         MANN
          There's a reason they chose me, just as
          there was a reason they chose you to
          find me.

                         RAY
          Oh yeah? Why?

                         MANN
          Because, you big jerk, I gave that
          interview.

                         RAY
          What interview?

                         MANN
          The one about Ebbets Field. The one
          that charged you up and sent you all the
          way to Boston to find me.

                         RAY
          Then you lied to me.

                         MANN
          You were kidnapping me at the time, you
          asshole! Think of it, Ray: maybe
          there's an Ebbets Field still floating
          around out there somewhere. And maybe
          I'll get to sit in the stands, and watch
          a twenty-year-old kid with a smooth face
          and kinky hair try out for the 1948
          Dodgers.

                         RAY
          (to Shoeless Joe)
          So I do all the work, and all I get is
          to see everybody else's dreams come
          true. Is that it?

                         SHOELESS JOE
          What are you saying, Ray?

                         RAY
          I'm saying I'm happy for you, and I'm
          happy for him, but after all
          this what's in it L for me?

                         SHOELESS JOE
          Is that why you did this? For-you?

                         MANN
          There's something out there for me, Ray.
          And what a story it'll make: a man
          being able to touch the perfect dream.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         111

                         154 CONTINUED (3)

                         154

                         RAY
          Then you'll write about it?

                         MANN
          You bet I will.
          Annie walks Karin over. Ray bends down to Karin's face.

                         RAY
          How you feeling, honey?

                         KARIN
          Stupid.
          Ray laughs and hugs her. He looks up at Annie.

                         RAY
          Terry's been invited to go-with the
          players.

                         ANNIE
          You mean 'out'?

                         RAY

                         (NODS)
          Out.

                         ANNIE

                         (HUMS TWILIGHT

                         ZONE THEME)
          Doo-doo-doo-doo. Be careful.
          She smiles brightly and gives Mann a kiss on the cheek.
          Mann shakes Ray's hand.

                         RAY--
          I want a full description.

                         MANN
          -You take care of this family, Ray.
          Mann joins several of the White Sox as they leave the
          field.

                         155 MARK

                         155
          is absolutely dumbfounded as'he sees the players fade out
          upon walking through the outfield gate. He turns to Annie.

                         MARK
          He just... Where'd he...?

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         112

          15.5 CONTINUED

                         155

                         ANNIE
          You go inside and lie down. I'll
          explain later.
          Mark walks off toward the people in their cars outside the house.

                         MARK
          Where'd all these people come from...?

          156 BACK AT THE FIELD

          2.56
          Only a few players are left on the field.

                         RAY
          We're keeping this field.

                         ANNIE
          You bet your ass we are.
          Ray realizes Shoeless Joe is staring at him, with a
          shit-eating grin on his face.

                         RAY
          What..
          Shoeless Joe just keeps smiling.

                         RAY
          What're you grinning at, you ghost?

                         SHOELESS JOE
          'If you build it...
          He nods toward where the catcher is taking off his gear at home plate.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          ' .he will come.'
          Ray looks at the Catcher. The hairs on the back of his
          neck begin to stand up.

                         RAY
          Oh, my God.

                         ANNIE
          What is it?

                         RAY
          Its my father.

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         113

          157 THE YOUNG CATCHER
          has taken off his mask. He is in his early twenties. He
          is in the same pose as the photo we saw in the prologue.

          158 RAY AND SHOELESS JOE
          Ray blanches and turns to Shoeless Joe, his voice a
          strangled whisper.

                         RAY
          Say it ain't so,- Joe.

                         SHOELESS JOE
          I'm afraid it is, kid.
          The Catcher is now walking toward Ray.

                         RAY

                         (FINALLY

                         UNDERSTANDING)
          'Ease his pain...'

                         SHOELESS JOE
          (smiles and nods)
          'Go the distance.'
          When he says those words, Shoeless Joe sounds just like The
          Voice.

                         RAY
          It was you.

                         159 SHOELESS JOE

                          159

                          SHOELESS JOE
           No, Ray. It was you.
           Shoeless joe winks and walks away, disappearing through the
           door in the outfield fence.

          160 RAY AND ANNIE

                         160
          The Catcher is halfway across the field. Ray turns to
          Annie. He cannot even swallow.

                         RAY
          My God, I only saw him later, when he
          was worn down by life. Look at him.
          The young Catcher has reached the outfield grass. Ray
          walks down to the edge of the outfield.

                         CONTINUED

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         114

                         160 CONTINUED

                          160

                          RAY
          He has his whole life in front of him,
          and I'm not even a glint in his eye.
          What do I say to him?

                         ANNIE
          Introduce him to his granddaughter.
          Ray cannot believe how wonderful Annie is. The Catcher has
          reached the edge of the field, and now stands before Ray
          and Annie.

                         CATCHER
          Hi, I just wanted to thank you folks for
          putting up the field and letting us play
          here. I'm John Kinsella.
          They shake his hand.

                         RAY
          I'm Ray. My wife Annie. And this is
          my daughter, Karin.

                         (TO KARIN)
          Karin, this is...
          He almost says "My father."

                         RAY

                         KARIN

                         JOHN
          Ray and Annie are beaming. Annie takes Karin's hand.

                         ANNIE
          We're going to let you two talk. I have
          to go look after our guests. Someone's
          gotta start collecting admission if
          we're going to keep this place.
          (to the Catcher)
          Very nice meeting you.

                         JOHN
          M' am.

                         161 ANNIE

                         161
          hoists Karin up and totes her toward the tourists waiting
          in front of the house.

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         115

          162 RAY AND JOHN

                         162
          watch them for a while, then start to,stroll across the
          field.

                         RAY
          You catch a good game.

                         JOHN
          Thank you. It's so beautiful here. Its
          like-well for me, it's like a dream
          come true.
          Ray cannot speak. He nods.

                         JOHN
          Can I ask you something?
          Again, Ray nods.

                         JOHN
          Is this heaven?
          Ray smiles and shakes his head no.

                         RAY
          It's Iowa.

                         JOHN
          Iowa. I could've sworn this was heaven.

                         163 RAY

                         16 3
          stops and looks intently at John. He asks this question
          as if he were asking the secret of life. Maybe he is.

                         RAY
          Is there a heaven?

                         164 JOHN

                         164
          takes time to answer that. He looks up at the night sky
          and searches it.

                         JOHN
          Oh, yeah...
          Then he looks square into Ray's eyes.

                         JOHN
          Heaven's where dreams come true.

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         116

                         165 RAY

                         165
          looks toward the house and sees his wife and daughter on
          the veranda, a moon bright as butter silvering the night
          above them. He smiles. He finally understands. He turns
          back to John and nods.

                         RAY
          Then maybe this is heaven.

                         166 JOHN

                         166
          smiles wisely in return.

                         JOHN
          Well...good night, Ray.

                         RAY
          Good night.

                         167 MASTER

                         167
          John starts to walk off toward the door in the outfield
          fence.

                         RAY
          Hey!
          John turns back. Ray is holding a ball.

                         RAY
          You wanna have a catch?
          John closes his eyes for a second, and when he opens them;
          there is the hint of moisture. Does he know Ray is his
          son?

                         JOHN
          I'd like that.

          Ray tosses him the ball, picks up a glove lying there, and
          puts it on.

          They throw the ball back and forth.

          And as we pull up higher and higher we see a father and son
          bathed by white floodlights and car headlights... on the
          silent, satiny green of a baseball diamond at the edge of
          a cornfield.

                         FADE OUT

                         THE END