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Mumford Movie Script

Writer(s) : Lawrence Kasdan

Genres : Comedy, Drama

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                                        "MUMFORD"

                                      Screenplay by

                                     Lawrence Kasdan

                                      SHOOTING DRAFT

                

               EXT. MAIN STREET, SMALL TOWN - DAY

               A freight truck of late 1950's vintage pulls to the side of 
               the road in a small rural town. A handsome, well-built man 
               gets out of the passenger side and thanks the Driver. THE 
               NEWCOMER carries his coat over his shoulder and a beat-up 
               suitcase; he's got a jut jaw and a modified pompadour, his 
               shirtsleeves are rolled all the way up past his biceps. He 
               wipes his brow against the sweltering heat and looks around. 
               [Until noted below, this section of the movie is in BLACK & 
               WHITE.]

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         I get outta the truck in this two-
                         bit town. I got no money and no 
                         prospects. What I need right now is 
                         a stiff drink, a cold shower, and a 
                         hot broad. I'll take 'em in any order 
                         they come...

               EXT. BOARDING HOUSE - DAY

               Old three story gothic house in ill-repair beyond a peeling 
               picket fence and a scruffy yard. The sign says -- ROOMS TO 
               RENT. The Newcomer goes in the gate.

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         ...Oh yeah, one other thing I need -- 
                         an angle.

               He squints through the dirty screen door but sees nothing, 
               then knocks and turns away to survey the neighborhood.

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         I was thinking -- if it weren't for 
                         bad luck, I wouldn't have any luck 
                         at all...

                                     LANDLADY (O.S.)
                         Can I help you?

               The Newcomer turns toward the door. Standing there, holding 
               the screen open, is the LANDLADY. She's a knockout in a cheap, 
               small-town way: a cotton dress that buttons down the front 
               and clings with sweat to her generous curves.

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         Either my luck had just changed, or 
                         Fate just bought me another round of 
                         trouble.

               INT. BOARDING HOUSE - DAY

               The Newcomer's POV of the Landlady as she leads him up the 
               narrow, gloomy stairs from the second floor to the third 
               story / attic. She has a Monroe-like sway to her walk. We 
               can barely HEAR her DISTANT, ECHOEY DIALOGUE:

                                     LANDLADY
                         ...not very fancy... house needs 
                         repairs... We haven't had a man around 
                         here for so long...

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         She kept yammerin' the whole time, 
                         but her hips were doing all the 
                         talking...

               The Landlady reaches the tiny landing at the top of the stairs 
               and opens a door to a squalid room with a bed, bureau and 
               tiny window. The Newcomer has to squeeze by her voluptuous 
               body to get inside and look around. It doesn't take long. 
               His gaze returns to the Landlady who is leaning against the 
               door, chest thrust forward. He focusses on her fingers, toying 
               with the button at her sweat-shiny cleavage.

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         It couldn't 'a been any clearer what 
                         the set-up was. The next move was up 
                         to me...

               The Newcomer takes a step in the Landlady's direction --

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         Don't tell me!

               INT. MUMFORD'S OFFICE - (PRESENT) DAY

               CLOSE-UP of MUMFORD wincing.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (softer)
                         -- That's all the time we have. 
                         Sorry...
                              (indicates his watch)
                         ...next time.

               We see Mumford's office: the office of a Psychologist, a 
               therapist with a doctorate. It's modest, comfortable, neat, 
               with a calm, relaxed ambience. [The movie is now in COLOR.] 
               His patient, HENRY FOLLETT, looks nothing like The Newcomer 
               in the soft-core fantasy he's been narrating. Instead, he's 
               a mild-looking pharmacist with glasses and a receding 
               hairline. Only the voice is the same; it's as studly as his 
               fantasy alter-ego. Follett has been lying on a couch, but 
               now has twisted with some irritation to look at Mumford.

                                     FOLLETT
                         I have eighteen more minutes!

                                     MUMFORD
                         I don't want to hear any more today.

                                     FOLLETT
                         Why not?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Mr. Follett, do you trust me or don't 
                         you?

                                     FOLLETT
                         Well, I don't know... I only been 
                         seeing you --

                                     MUMFORD
                         Without trust, there's no point to 
                         any of this. You might as well not 
                         come.

                                     FOLLETT
                         Now hold on, I didn't say I didn't 
                         want to come --

                                     MUMFORD
                         Good, then go.

               INT. LILY'S CAF�- DAY

               Lunch crowd. Mumford can be seen out the big front window, 
               crossing from the two-story building that houses his office 
               on the main drag of this small town which, oddly enough, is 
               also called Mumford. He comes inside and goes to the counter 
               to pick up some take-out. The Proprietor is a woman around 
               forty named LILY, who talks to him as she works.

                                     LILY
                         You're early... it's not ready. What 
                         happened?

                                     MUMFORD
                         My patient had to leave early.

                                     LILY
                         Who was that?

               She comes over to the register with an order. Mumford is 
               am[...] her, likes her a lot.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Does the phrase "nosy" have any 
                         meaning to you, Lily?

                                     LILY
                         I think it's like... inquisitive.

                                     MUMFORD
                         It was Henry Follett.

                                     LILY
                              (reacts)
                         Man, you see him a lot. And it's 
                         very wrong to reveal it. Next you'll 
                         be saying what his problem is.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What do you want to know?

                                     LILY
                         You're terrible. I'm never telling 
                         you anything.

               A Patron passes on the way out.

                                     PATRON
                         Hey, Doc... how's it going?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Fine, Vincent... how's yourself?

                                     LILY
                         How long you been in this town?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Oh, I don't know...

                                     LILY
                         Four months, two and a half weeks -- 
                         that's how long.
                              (Mumford gives her a 
                              look)
                         And you've already got more patients 
                         than those other two shrinks combined.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Lily, I don't think even you could 
                         know that --

               Lily sees something out the window.

                                     LILY
                         Look at that guy...

               Mumford turns to look out the window. A young man of about 
               30, in jeans and a Hawaiian shirt, is skateboarding down the 
               street at high speed, weaving in and out amongst the cars. 
               He zips past the front of the restaurant.

                                     LILY
                         You know who that is, don't you?
                              (Mumford does not)
                         You really don't? That's Skip 
                         Skipperton, man. He gets himself hit 
                         by a truck, this whole town shuts 
                         down.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Oh, so that's him? The Panda Man.

               LILY hands over Mumford's bagged order, rings it up. Back on 
               track:

                                     LILY
                         So, what makes you so popular? What's 
                         your secret?

                                     MUMFORD
                              (takes his bag to go)
                         You like me. How come?

                                     LILY
                         Not sure. Let me think about it.

               Mumford is smiling as he goes out. Another Patron, LIONEL 
               DILLARD, a lawyer, brings his check to Lily, watching Mumford 
               cross the street. Lily can't stand this guy.

                                     LIONEL
                         That's the new psychiatrist?

                                     LILY
                         Psychologist. He's not medical.

                                     LIONEL
                         Probably thinks he's pretty smart.

               Lily gives him a look as she takes his money.

               INT. MUMFORD'S OFFICE - DAY

               An overweight, teenage girl named NESSA WATKINS is on 
               Mumford's couch. She fidgets as she talks and can't decide 
               whether to lie down (so she's looking away from him) or sit 
               up and face him. She plays with an unlit cigarette and keeps 
               taking out a lighter, then stuffing it back in her big, sloppy 
               handbag.

                                     NESSA
                         ...so he already had the tattoo that 
                         said, "Naomi Forever"... and now 
                         they're broken up, see, and he has 
                         to have it removed. But while the 
                         scar is still healing, or whatever 
                         you call it when you have a tattoo 
                         removed, he meets Chandra. And it's 
                         serious, immediate love. So in no 
                         time, he's gone from the most gorgeous 
                         model in the world to the most 
                         gorgeous actress in North America.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What do you mean, "in no time"?

                                     NESSA
                         In maybe three or four issues.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Weekly or monthly?

                                     NESSA
                         Monthly! God, how shallow do you 
                         think Brad is? Why do I waste my 
                         time telling you this stuff?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Why do you think you tell me, Nessa?

                                     NESSA
                         Don't do that thing...
                              (Mumford: what?)
                         ...that shrink thing.

                                     MUMFORD
                         It's a big part of the show.

               She jams the cigarette in her mouth and flames the lighter, 
               but is afraid to actually break his rules.

                                     NESSA
                         You really need to let people smoke 
                         in here, you know. It's perverse. 
                         What are they paying you to see me?

               Mumford indicates "nothing".

                                     NESSA
                         The school board doesn't pay you? 
                         What kind of deal is that?

                                     MUMFORD
                         It's called pro bono.

                                     NESSA
                         Pro boner?
                              (he waits her out)
                         Pro bono, huh? For whose good, 
                         supposedly?

                                     MUMFORD
                         It's my bit for the community.

                                     NESSA
                         Fuck the community.
                              (he won't go for it)
                         There was this article my friends 
                         and I read. It was "25 Signs He's 
                         Great in Bed". It was very 
                         fascinating.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Where was this?

                                     NESSA
                         Where?... The New York Times. The 
                         first one was -- "he handles produce 
                         well." Which we already knew!
                              (an expression she 
                              uses)
                         The point is, you have a lot of the 
                         signs.

                                     MUMFORD
                         You been spying on me in the 
                         supermarket, Nessa?

                                     NESSA
                         Have women found you attractive?

               Mumford laughs.

                                     NESSA
                         I knew you wouldn't answer. I've 
                         been thinking about what you said 
                         last time. How me trying to lose 
                         weight -- and constantly not -- is 
                         like a lot of people with addictions. 
                         How maybe I can't lose the weight, 
                         ever...
                              (quietly)
                         Which we already knew...

                                     MUMFORD
                         That's not quite what I said --

                                     NESSA
                         It's a really weird thing for a shrink 
                         to say... and then you said maybe 
                         people'd be happier if they'd accept 
                         that some things don't change -- 
                         that it'd be some kind of a relief 
                         or something...

               Mumford waits.

                                     NESSA
                         Well, I guess I'm just a dumb bitch, 
                         but how depressing is that moment -- 
                         the moment when you give up?

               EXT. HIKING TRAIL, MOUNTAIN FOREST - MAGIC

               The last rays of sun are fighting their way through the trees 
               as Mumford comes up the trail he clearly knows very well.

               EXT. BIG ROCK LOOKOUT POINT - MAGIC

               Mumford climbs out on the Big Rock, settles himself on the 
               edge and takes a long drink from a water bottle.

               WHAT HE SEES: far below at the foot of these hills, lights 
               just twinkling on, is the town of Mumford. He stares at it 
               for several long moments. Then he takes a small headlamp 
               from his pack and fits the straps over his head (it looks 
               like a miner's light). He twists the light on to test it and 
               turns his head to watch the beam move about.

               WE CUT BACK WIDE. After a beat, Mumford settles back and 
               turns off the light.

               INT. SCATTERGOOD'S TAVERN - NIGHT

               The place is quietly busy with the regulars. Mumford has a 
               favorite spot at the far end of the bar. Right now he's 
               sitting alone, reading the remnants of a newspaper.

               SKIP SKIPPERTON, the man on the skateboard, comes in. Everyone 
               in the bar is surprised to see Skip in here. Several patrons 
               greet him as he makes his way deeper inside, looking around. 
               He's uncomfortable. He seems relieved when he spots Mumford 
               and heads back there. Mumford doesn't notice Skip waiting 
               for his attention.

                                     SKIP
                         Hi.

               Mumford looks up, smiles. Skip offers his hand.

                                     SKIP
                         You're Doc Mumford.
                              (Mumford nods)
                         Skip Skipperton.

                                     MUMFORD
                         How are you?

                                     SKIP
                         Fine. Okay. Pretty good. I've been 
                         hoping we'd meet. I've heard a lot 
                         about you.

               Mumford waits, friendly. Skip runs out of gas, gets uneasy, 
               glances around.

                                     SKIP
                         Do you think we could...? Can I buy 
                         you a drink?

                                                                    CUT TO:

               [...]

               LATER. IN A BOOTH near the back. They've been at it a while, 
               but nothing is clear to Mumford, yet. Skip keeps his voice 
               down; he doesn't want anyone else in the bar to hear him.

                                     SKIP
                         ..."Find the need and fill it" my 
                         dad used to say -- I guess a lot of 
                         dads say that -- but I did and it 
                         just took off.

                                     MUMFORD
                         No kidding... Panda. Where'd that 
                         come from?

                                     SKIP
                         Panda? I've always liked giant 
                         pandas... I've been to China and 
                         seen them in the wild. That's the 
                         kind of thing I can do if I want... 
                         now. I can do pretty much anything I 
                         want to do these days.

               Skip stares into his beer for a moment, as though the thought 
               depresses him. He catches himself and snaps back --

                                     SKIP
                         So now we make 23% of the modems in 
                         the market, which is pretty good.

               Skip glances around, leans in, confidential.

                                     SKIP
                         When I was growing up here, the town 
                         was about dead. The timber business 
                         was played out... Panda changed all 
                         that. Now, just about everybody in 
                         town either works for the company or 
                         depends on it somehow. Which is kinda 
                         the problem...

               Mumford waits, watches. Skip gets uncomfortable.

                                     SKIP
                         Would you like another beer?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Nah... scotch.

                                     SKIP
                              (brightens, like a 
                              kid)
                         Far out. Single malt?
                              (gets up)
                         Can I pick it?

               Skip heads off to the bar. Mumford looks around. Everybody 
               is watching.

                                                               DISSOLVE TO:

               LATER. The bar crowd has thinned. Both Mumford and Skip have 
               had a few. In fact, Mumford is now carefully pouring them 
               each another drink from a bottle of Glensomething on the 
               table.

                                     MUMFORD
                         You want me... to be... your friend.

               Skip beams. Mumford leans forward in the same confidential 
               way Skip did before; he indicates that Skip should lean in 
               too. Mumford is almost whispering --

                                     MUMFORD
                         But that's not what's really going 
                         on...
                              (Skip is excited)
                         ...What's really going on is... you 
                         have some problems and you want some 
                         therapy, but you feel it could be 
                         very bad for Panda Modem stock if 
                         word got out that you were having 
                         head problems.

               Skip confirms that's it.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Can I ask you a personal question?

                                     SKIP
                         Of course! That's exactly what I 
                         want.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Have you thought about getting a 
                         wife?

               Skip makes a face and gesture to indicate a large "YES!", 
               but also total frustration and failure.

                                     SKIP
                         When Panda started to happen, I was 
                         dating women from New York, San 
                         Francisco, L.A. They came out of the 
                         woodwork. Models, actresses, venture 
                         capitalists... These were not the 
                         kind of girls who were interested in 
                         me before I hit it... And you know 
                         what I discovered? I discovered these 
                         girls did not love me for myself. 
                         The majority of them didn't even 
                         like me. But a lot of them would've 
                         gladly become Mrs. Skipperton for a 
                         while. Can you imagine that -- 
                         marrying someone just because they've 
                         got money?

               Mumford considers that.

                                     SKIP
                         I gotta pee.
                              (he gets up, a little 
                              wobbly)
                         Can I ask you something? This town 
                         is called Mumford... Been that way 
                         since... 18... 18-0... 18-0...
                              (finally remembers)
                         ...thirteen! Right?
                              (Mumford: if you say 
                              so)
                         Now here's the question -- Your name 
                         is Mumford, too.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Is that the question?

                                     SKIP
                         You moved here from back East and 
                         your name is the same as this town. 
                         Is that right?
                              (Mumford shrugs)
                         Far out.

               Skip takes a few steps toward the men's room, then comes 
               back and leans down toward Mumford.

                                     SKIP
                         I hope you don't think I want you to 
                         do this for free. Just because we're 
                         gonna play it like we're friends, 
                         doesn't mean I won't pay you like a 
                         doctor.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I understand.

                                     SKIP
                         I have a lot of money. Do you know 
                         how much money I've got?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Don't tell me, 'cause I'm not going 
                         to tell you what I've got.

                                     SKIP
                         I've got three big ones.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I'm impressed. I couldn't make three 
                         million dollars if I lived three 
                         lifetimes.

                                     SKIP
                         No, no... I have three billion 
                         dollars.

               Skip stumbles off to take a leak. Mumford takes a moment to 
               digest that. It's difficult.

               INT. MUMFORD'S OFFICE - DAY

               Mumford is listening to Lionel, the arrogant lawyer who asked 
               about him in the restaurant. Lionel is lying on the couch, 
               talking with enormous energy; he has a serious superiority 
               complex. Mumford can't stand him and the session seems to be 
               lasting an eternity.

                                     LIONEL
                         ...so I'm watching Brokaw and they've 
                         got some astronomer, this little 
                         limey know-it-all, and he's telling 
                         how, with this Himball telescope, 
                         they've discovered there are maybe 
                         400 million more galaxies than they 
                         thought there were. And I guess that's 
                         supposed to make me feel small? I'm 
                         supposed to feel insignificant? Is 
                         that the point? Because I can tell 
                         you it didn't.

               Mumfords eyes dart to look at --

               THE CLOCK on the bookshelf: 2:23

                                     MUMFORD
                         Lionel, since this is our first 
                         session together, maybe --

               Lionel is twisting his neck around painfully to look back at 
               Mumford.

                                     MUMFORD
                         -- you can sit up and look at me if 
                         you'd like --
                              (Lionel waves that 
                              off and looks away)
                         -- maybe it would be helpful if you 
                         told me a little about what brought 
                         you here.

                                     LIONEL
                         Kind of impatient for a big-time 
                         headshrinker, aren't you? How 'bout 
                         you let me explain it my own way...

               As Lionel goes on, Mumford's eyes again dart toward -- THE 
               CLOCK: still 2:23! Hold on it. Finally, it moves. Mumford's 
               eyes dart toward his desk --

               A deadly-looking letter opener in the shape of Excalibur 
               stands GLINTING LIGHT in a marble rendition of Arthur's stone.

                                     LIONEL
                         ...and in the dream, it's always the 
                         same, I wake up in my room from when 
                         I was I kid in Ohio, and I realize 
                         this is the day of the big exam at 
                         school...

               Mumford's head rocks slowly back for a moment as if he's 
               going to drift off. He snaps back to life and stares hard at 
               the top of Lionel's head, where there is a bald spot starting 
               to take hold. The sound of LIONEL'S VOICE begins to echo --

                                     LIONEL
                         ...which is no problem for me, because 
                         I remembered it was coming and I've 
                         attended every class, so I'm totally 
                         prepared. Then I see myself running 
                         down the hall at school...

               MUMFORD'S GLANCE FLASHPANS from Lionel's bald spot to the 
               gleaming letter opener.

               Mumford closes his eyes. We CUT TO:

               INT. HIGH SCHOOL HALLWAY - DAY

               A boy, unmistakably the Young Lionel, runs down the deserted 
               hallway toward a bright doorway. [LIONEL'S DREAM has a BLUE 
               TINT.]

                                     LIONEL (V.O.)
                         ...but it's not really my school -- 
                         and this is very interesting -- it's 
                         the school from the next district --

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         -- Go on!

               INT. HIGH SCHOOL CLASSROOM - DAY

               Young Lionel comes breathlessly in the classroom door and 
               stares alarmed.

                                     LIONEL (V.O.)
                         And even though I arrive a little 
                         bit early, everybody's already there. 
                         But the surprising part is --

               WHAT YOUNG LIONEL SEES: Everyone in the class, including the 
               Teacher in the front, is naked. The Teacher holds out an 
               exam toward Young Lionel.

                                     LIONEL (V.O.)
                         -- I'm the only one who's prepared!

                                                                    CUT TO:

               INT. WAITING ROOM, MUMFORD'S OFFICE - DAY

               ALTHEA BROCKETT, a woman in her forties, sits on the couch 
               reading a mail order catalogue for home furnishings. There 
               are several other catalogues sticking out of her jammed, 
               woven carry-all.

               The door to Mumford's inner office opens with some force. 
               Mumford stands looking back across his office at Lionel, who 
               is getting up from the couch in some confusion.

                                     LIONEL
                         -- you crazy? You can't do this!

                                     MUMFORD
                         Sure I can, Lionel.

                                     LIONEL
                         I'm a criminal lawyer -- you think I 
                         like my clients? I can't stand most 
                         of them! But I don't kick them out...

                                     MUMFORD
                         See that sign -- We retain the right 
                         to refuse service to anyone. I'm not 
                         going to charge you for this session, 
                         but I don't want to see you back 
                         here.

               Lionel looks around, but there is no such sign. He does spot 
               Althea watching the show from the couch.

                                     LIONEL
                         Don't you at least have a back door 
                         I can use?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Come out this way. There's no shame 
                         in getting a little therapy... is 
                         there, Althea?

               Althea stands up, smiling. She thinks Mumford is the bee's 
               knees.

                                     ALTHEA
                         Not at all. It takes guts, Lionel.

               Lionel steams by them in a black mood.

                                     LIONEL
                         Maybe some of us don't need this 
                         crap!

                                     MUMFORD
                         And it's the Hubble Telescope, not 
                         the Himball Telescope.

               Lionel bangs out the front door. Mumford motions Althea inside --

                                     MUMFORD
                         Jeez... what an asshole.

               Althea heads inside, giggling wildly. She can't get enough 
               of this guy.

               INT. MUMFORD'S OFFICE -DAY

               Althea is sobbing. Mumford hands her a new Kleenex from the 
               box next to the couch. She wads it with her current one and 
               tries to stop crying. Mumford settles back in his chair, 
               patient.

                                     ALTHEA
                         What do they want from me?
                              (more sobbing)
                         What have I done that's so wrong?
                              (pulling it together)
                         They act as though they don't have 
                         their own peculiar things... They 
                         do! Believe me. Everybody's got 
                         something...
                              (looks at Mumford)
                         Even you probably have things.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Me more than most.

                                     ALTHEA
                         Why are they ganging up against me?

                                     MUMFORD
                         I'm not sure. But I think they're 
                         worried about you.

                                     ALTHEA
                         It's the kids, you know, not Jeremy. 
                         He had nothing to do with this -- 
                         except pay, of course. He's always 
                         willing to pay. He's extremely 
                         generous.
                              (a long beat)
                         I'm so humiliated that my own children 
                         would threaten me.

                                     MUMFORD
                         How did they threaten you?

                                     ALTHEA
                         They said if I didn't get help, they 
                         wouldn't deal with me any more.
                              (a beseeching look)
                         What do you think about that?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Good kids.

               Althea stares at him a long moment. She knows he's right. 
               Tears well up in her eyes and roll down her cheeks. She grabs 
               another Kleenex. In the midst of the torrent she tries to 
               talk, but it's undecipherable:

                                     ALTHEA
                         Mmmmfffstttubll abbittmm.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Hmm?

               Althea uses three new tissues to dry up her face.

                                     ALTHEA
                         I said... you must come out to the 
                         house for dinner on Thursday.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Really? You think so?

                                     ALTHEA
                         Yes. Jeremy will be home for the 
                         weekend. And you can meet the kids.

               Mumford considers, then nods his assent.

               EXT. MUMFORD'S STREET - MAGIC

               Mumford hurries up the sidewalk carrying two grocery bags. 
               He's late. The modest houses are close together on this pretty 
               street, which rises out of the main business district, seen 
               beyond Mumford.

               EXT. THE DUPLEX HOUSE - MAGIC

               Mumford comes to the house where he lives. He heads down the 
               driveway toward the stairs that lead up to his apartment.

               The front yard is completely fenced. Lily, the owner of the 
               restaurant, is almost visible in there working among the 
               greenery of a lush garden. Her friendly dog, AINGE, sees 
               Mumford, leaps easily over the fence and does a circle around 
               Mumford, who has no free hand to pet him.

                                     MUMFORD
                         How ya doin', Ainge? Evenin', Lily.

                                     LILY
                         Doc.
                              (doesn't look up)
                         Ainge...

               The dog leaps gracefully back into the yard. Mumford hurries 
               up the stairs.

               INT. MUMFORD'S APARTMENT - MAGIC

               Mumford comes in and puts the bags down on the kitchen 
               counter. He goes directly to the table by his main chair and 
               picks up the TV remote. He switches it on and changes the 
               channel. The opening segment of UNSOLVED MYSTERIES is just 
               beginning. It previews the stories on that evening's episode -- 
               disappearances and unclosed cases -- with Robert Stack 
               hosting.

               CLOSE ON MUMFORD'S FACE as he watches. Only when the whole 
               show has been previewed does he seem to relax. He leaves the 
               show on as he goes into the kitchen and begins unloading the 
               bags.

               INT. COOK'S HARDWARE STORE - DAY

               Mumford is comparing different stepladders. MR. COOK, the 
               sixty-ish proprietor, has been watching from a distance, but 
               now --

                                     COOK
                         Dr. Mumford.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (doesn't really know 
                              him)
                         Mr. Cook.

                                     COOK
                         Could you come with me please?

               Mystified, Mumford follows Cook through the door into the 
               back.

               BACK OF THE STORE. Cook motions for Mumford to take the seat 
               of honor in the work area, but Mumford prefers to stand. 
               Cook has a little trouble figuring how to start. Finally --

                                     COOK
                         I know I shoulda come to your office. 
                         I was gonna, actually, but then when 
                         you walked in here today...

                                     MUMFORD
                         Uh-huh.

                                     COOK
                         It's my daughter Sofie... she's gotta 
                         problem.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What's that?

                                     COOK
                         We're not sure. She's been to all 
                         kinds of doctors in the city and 
                         they've said different things. Some 
                         of 'em are callin' it --
                              (wants to get this 
                              right)
                         -- Epstein-Barr virus, and the rest 
                         are callin' it... Chronic Fatigue 
                         Symptom...

                                     MUMFORD
                         Syndrome... Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

                                     COOK
                         That's it -- syndrome. So you know 
                         all about it?

                                     MUMFORD
                         No... a little. There's a lot of 
                         debate about it.

                                     COOK
                         Yeah, I got that. Some people think 
                         it's all in their heads.
                              (more intense)
                         It's been so bad she's had to move 
                         back here to Mumford and live with 
                         us. And I'm not sure that's the best 
                         thing, either...

                                     MUMFORD
                         Why's that?

                                     COOK
                         Oh... a lot of things. Several 
                         different factors. Will you see her, 
                         Doctor Mumford?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Sure. Why don't you bring her up to 
                         my office at 3 tomorrow afternoon.

               Cook nods, but looks worried.

                                     COOK
                         I'm not sure she'll come. She's in a 
                         mood. Do you ever go to somebody's 
                         house?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Generally that doesn't work out so 
                         well. It sends the wrong message to 
                         people who need to make a change.

               Cook is quick to agree; he doesn't want to make waves. But 
               he's worried.

               EXT. MAIN STREET - DAY

               Mumford is walking up the busy sidewalk carrying his new 5-
               foot stepladder hooked on his shoulder. Folks greet him. 
               Suddenly Lionel appears in front of Mumford, who stops.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Hello, Lionel.

                                     LIONEL
                         You've got to have the right ladder 
                         for the job. You don't know what 
                         you're doing, you can get yourself 
                         in trouble.

                                     MUMFORD
                         You're right, as usual. See you.

               Mumford continues up the street. We STAY WITH Lionel, who 
               watches Mumford with a sour look, then turns to enter a small 
               medical building.

               INT. DR. DELBANCO'S OFFICE - DAY

               DR. ERNEST DELBANCO, a middle-aged psychiatrist with longish, 
               vanity hair, and PHYLLIS SHEELER, a psychologist in her 
               thirties, sit on the doctor's comfortable furniture, 
               listening. The remains of their take-out lunch is on the 
               coffee table. They seem a little impatient with their as-yet-
               unseen visitor --

                                     LIONEL (O.S.)
                         ...completely inappropriate and highly 
                         unprofessional. Now I don't want to 
                         presume to tell you how to run your 
                         businesses --

                                     SHEELER
                         -- practices.

               Lionel is sitting across the room, making an ardent case --

                                     LIONEL
                         -- Whatever. Six months ago, you two 
                         were the only games in town. The 
                         value of your...
                              (mocking)
                         ..."practices" could be seriously 
                         undermined by this bozo. A town this 
                         size has only so many headcases to 
                         go around.

                                     DELBANCO
                         What exactly would you have us do, 
                         Lionel?

                                     LIONEL
                         Protect your turf! Check this guy 
                         out. I smell a rat, I tell you.

               Delbanco and Sheeler exchange a look; they find Lionel 
               distasteful.

                                     SHEELER
                         Mr. Dillard, I'm sure Dr. Delbanco 
                         shares my gratitude for your concern. 
                         But I also know he'd agree that you 
                         misunderstand the nature of our 
                         calling to mental health. We're not 
                         in some... widget business, trying 
                         to crush our competition.

                                     LIONEL
                         What the hell's a widget?

               INT. HALLWAY OUTSIDE DR. DELBANCO'S OFFICE - DAY

               Lionel comes out of the office, miffed, and goes down the 
               stairs. A moment later, the door opens slightly and Delbanco 
               peeks out to make sure Lionel is gone. He closes the door on 
               us.

               INT. DR. DELBANCO'S OFFICE - DAY

               Delbanco stands at the door looking across the room at 
               Sheeler.

                                     DELBANCO
                         What an asshole!

                                     SHEELER
                              (agrees)
                         Ernest, what do you think?

                                     DELBANCO
                         I think he's got a point.

               So does she.

               EXT. BASEBALL DIAMOND - DAY

               Idyllic. The beautifully manicured field is surrounded by 
               lush woods. Standing about forty feet apart, Mumford and 
               Skip are alone on the field throwing a baseball back and 
               forth. For quite a while the only sounds are the birds, the 
               wind, and the regular SLAP of ball into glove. Finally --

                                     SKIP
                         This is great!

               SLAP... SLAP.

                                     SKIP
                         This is exactly what I wanted.

               SLAP... SLAP.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Skip, you must have lots of people 
                         you can throw a ball with.

                                     SKIP
                         You'd be surprised. Most guys have 
                         kids or wives or girlfriends. They're 
                         busy. It's not as easy as you think.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Skip, you're the head of the whole 
                         deal here. Are they busier than you?

                                     SKIP
                         Well, you know... that's the thing. 
                         Like I said, just about everybody in 
                         town works for me. And it's just not 
                         the same asking someone to throw a 
                         ball when they work for you. It's 
                         like an order or something... And no 
                         one -- no one -- asks me.

               Mumford considers. SLAP... SLAP... SLAP.

                                     MUMFORD
                         So, would you say we're out here... 
                         let me think how to put this... Is 
                         your problem really that you're... 
                         lonely?

                                     SKIP
                         Don't you like this?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Hell yes, I like it. What's better 
                         than this? Most guys would kill just 
                         to have someone do this with them 
                         whenever they like.

                                     SKIP
                         Okay then.
                              (SLAP... SLAP)
                         Have you got a lot of friends?

                                     MUMFORD
                              ("nope")
                         Lily and I talk a bit. You know Lily, 
                         runs the coffee shop?

                                     SKIP
                         No... I've seen her. Good-looking 
                         woman.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (agrees)
                         She's probably ten years older than 
                         you.

                                     SKIP
                              (SLAP... SLAP)
                         Good-looking woman.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Lives downstairs from me. She's got 
                         a great dog named for Danny Ainge.

                                     SKIP
                              (sparks to that)
                         Really? I'm the only person I know 
                         that likes Danny Ainge, outside of 
                         Celtic fans. Maybe Phoenix.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Well, there's Lily.

                                     SKIP
                         Did you know that Danny Ainge was 
                         drafted by the Blue Jays? Do you 
                         know what kind of athlete you have 
                         to be to play in the NBA and in the 
                         bigs?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Amazing.

                                     SKIP
                         Unbelievable...
                              (SLAP... SLAP)
                         ...And Lily named her dog after him? 
                         Far out.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What kind of person do you have to 
                         be to do this?

               Mumford gestures off in the one direction we have not yet 
               seen.

                                     SKIP
                         What?

                                     MUMFORD
                         This --

                                                                    CUT TO:

               REVERSE ANGLE: The baseball diamond is sitting in the vast, 
               lush grounds behind the PANDA MODEM WORLD HEADQUARTERS, a 
               brand new, distinctively original, high-tech office park. 
               Wherever there is an opportunity for tasteful signage, it is 
               in the motif of a Giant Panda -- sweet white face, black 
               eyes and ears, round body.

               Skip is suddenly self-conscious, embarrassed.

                                     SKIP
                         I would've traded any of it to have 
                         made the Mumford High varsity.

               Mumford takes that in. SLAP... SLAP.

                                     SKIP
                         So I guess Henry Follett is a patient 
                         of yours. He's my pharmacist.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Yeah.
                              (SLAP... SLAP)
                         Guy's got some serious sex fantasies.

               Skip is a little surprised to hear this from Mumford, but he 
               just throws the ball.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Pretty good, too. Lots of detail. 
                         Nothing hard core. Old-fashioned 
                         ones, from back when people cared 
                         about atmosphere and character.

                                     SKIP
                         Uh-huh.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Problem is, his fantasy life's a lot 
                         better than his real one. Nothing 
                         can live up to it. His wife got sick 
                         of it and left him. Took his kids 
                         with her.

                                     SKIP
                         I wondered what happened to her...

               Skip is fascinated, but a little uncomfortable. Mumford seems 
               oblivious, unusually talkative --

                                     MUMFORD
                         Of course, it's not that simple. 
                         There's something powerful going on 
                         there. We've got a lot of work to 
                         do.
                              (announcer voice)
                         It's hit to the warning track!

               For the first time, Mumford throws the ball way high, like a 
               long fly ball. Skip, delighted as a dog, takes off running 
               and just barely catches it on the run. He pegs it back to 
               Mumford.

                                     MUMFORD
                         In these fantasies, Henry Follett is 
                         played by a handsome guy with biceps. 
                         Can you imagine that? Where your 
                         self-esteem has to be?
                              (throws him the ball)
                         Man, I'd just like to move the guy 
                         to the point where he gets to appear 
                         in his own fantasies.

               INT. MUMFORD'S OFFICE - DAY

               Silence. Nessa sits staring at Mumford defiantly, an unlit 
               cigarette in her mouth. Mumford looks at the clock -- 3:00 -- 
               and stands up, session over. Nessa quickly lights her 
               cigarette with the lighter concealed in her hand and stands 
               up too. She exhales a huge cloud of smoke and walks quickly 
               to the back door of the office, which Mumford has opened for 
               her, and goes out.

               Mumford waves half-heartedly at the cloud of smoke as he 
               walks to the door to the waiting room and opens it.

               MUMFORD'S POV: As the door swings open, the first figure we 
               see is Mr. Cook; he twists around at the sound of the door. 
               He acknowledges Mumford and then sighs as he steps aside to 
               reveal, sitting exhausted in a chair, his daughter --

               SOFIE -- a young woman whose actual appearance is somewhat 
               disguised at present by her wan, ashen visage. She regards 
               Mumford with some resignation. Her father helps her out of 
               the chair. Sofie keeps her eyes on Mumford.

               CLOSE ON Mumford, watching her.

               INT. MUMFORD'S OFFICE - DAY

               LATER. Mr. Cook is gone. Sofie is sitting up on the couch, 
               facing Mumford. She looks like she might pass out at any 
               moment, but her voice is stronger than you'd expect.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Feel free to lie down. Most people 
                         do.

                                     SOFIE
                         I'd better not, I'll fall right to 
                         sleep. I think it's too soon for me 
                         to be sleeping with you.

               A joke. Mumford smiles.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What can you tell me about this?

                                     SOFIE
                         Oh, lord. It's almost too exhausting 
                         to tell you...
                              (tiny smile, to herself)
                         ...about my exhaustion. I didn't 
                         really want to come. I'm not hopeful 
                         right now. But I couldn't take the 
                         look on my dad's face. He's a truly 
                         kind person, which is pretty 
                         extraordinary if you knew the story. 
                         He's the opposite of me, I guess -- 
                         all stamina and resolve.

               It's taken all her energy to say this and she sinks down a 
               bit into the couch.

                                     MUMFORD
                         When did you start to feel this way?

                                     SOFIE
                         About six months ago, I guess it is 
                         now. God, it seems like years. What 
                         a bore! I'm embarrassed by it. Before 
                         this happened -- when I'd hear people 
                         talk about this kind of thing -- I 
                         thought it was a bunch of bullshit.

               She sees something in his face and suddenly laughs -- it's a 
               weak but magical sound.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What?

                                     SOFIE
                         You think that now! You think it's a 
                         bunch of hooey, don't you?

                                     MUMFORD
                              (unconvincing)
                         No.

                                     SOFIE
                         I saw it. I saw it in your eyes.

               Mumford is knocked off balance -- she's right. She saw him 
               clearly.

                                     SOFIE
                         That's okay. Maybe it is. My mother 
                         always says -- "Everything that's 
                         wrong with you is in your head." I 
                         suppose that's true.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Back when this started, was there 
                         anything unusual happening in your 
                         life? A change of job, of living 
                         situation... a loss of some kind?

                                     SOFIE
                         No... but it started one year to the 
                         day after my divorce became final. 
                         That's not too suspicious, is it?... 
                         But it wasn't like I was feeling bad 
                         about the divorce. Just the opposite.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Hmm.

                                     SOFIE
                         Hmm? Is that a professional opinion?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Hmm, as in -- that's interesting. 
                         Sometimes, with enough clues, it's 
                         possible to figure these things out.

                                     SOFIE
                         Even if you don't think it's real?

                                     MUMFORD
                         I don't know what's real and what 
                         isn't. That's never been my strong 
                         suit. But if you're tired all the 
                         time and you've had to give up the 
                         life you were having and come back 
                         home when you didn't want to... that's 
                         worth trying to fix. Maybe I can 
                         help you do that.

                                     SOFIE
                         What would you do?

                                     MUMFORD
                         We... we would try several things. 
                         But I need to see you a lot.

                                     SOFIE
                         I don't know. I barely made it today.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I'll come to you. We'll try a little 
                         walking.

               Sofie suddenly looks defeated.

                                     MUMFORD
                         We'll take it slow. You'll never 
                         feel you can't handle it.

                                     SOFIE
                         I don't think I can afford it. I 
                         don't want my dad paying.

                                     MUMFORD
                         We'll work it out.

               Sofie gives him a long look.

                                     SOFIE
                         You have the best answer for 
                         everything.
                              (Mumford shrugs)
                         You seem so... hopeful. Are you always 
                         this sunny?

                                     MUMFORD
                         No one ever thought so. You must 
                         bring it out.

                                     SOFIE
                         Is it contagious? 'Cause everyone 
                         agrees my immune system's way down.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Maybe you'll catch it.

                                     SOFIE
                         Can I ask you something?
                              (Mumford: of course)
                         Didn't you tell my dad you didn't 
                         think it was a good idea to come to 
                         the patient?
                              (he admits it)
                         So what changed?

               Mumford just smiles. He doesn't want to tell her the truth -- 
               everything.

               EXT. BROCKETT HOUSE - MAGIC

               A taxi drops Mumford in front of the Brockett's large and 
               beautiful house, which sits on an isolated lot on the 
               outskirts of town.

               INT. HALLWAY TO BACK VERANDA, BROCKETT HOUSE - MAGIC

               Althea leads Mumford toward the back of the lavishly appointed 
               house. The weird thing, what gets in the way of the decor, 
               is the cardboard boxes of all sizes which are stacked 
               everywhere. Many are unopened, but the rest are spilling 
               their styrofoam-nugget and bubble-wrap guts to reveal some 
               hint of their contents: a huge variety of catalogue-ordered 
               housewares, clothing, linens, gadgets, and knickknacks. If 
               it can be ordered from an upscale catalogue (and everything 
               can), it is here. Althea sounds very nervous, cheery.

                                     ALTHEA
                         -- sorry everything's in such an 
                         uproar. Lots of big occasions coming 
                         up, and of course Christmas is only 
                         eight months away --
                              (giggles uncontrollably)
                         -- I don't know what's keeping Jeremy. 
                         You know he stays in the city three 
                         nights a week -- I guess I explained 
                         that...
                              (Mumford nods)
                         ...I know Katie's here, but I'm not 
                         so sure about Martin... I'm making 
                         dinner myself tonight, so I'll have 
                         to leave you, I'm afraid...

               EXT. REAR VERANDA, BROCKETT HOUSE - MAGIC

               They come out onto the wide porch, which commands a 
               spectacular view of the surrounding countryside. There's an 
               elaborate bar cart out here, which Althea points Mumford 
               toward.

                                     ALTHEA
                         I'm awful I know, but will you please 
                         help yourself. I just got a new copper 
                         sauciere from Williams-Sonoma and 
                         I'm afraid it'll be the death of us 
                         all if I don't get back in there...

               She disappears inside with a bang of the screen door. Mumford 
               gets a drink for himself, taking in the view. He sees 
               something out there.

               MUMFORD'S POV: Way in the distance, coming out of the woods 
               and down toward the house is a teenage boy.

                                     KATIE (O.S.)
                         You're the doctor, aren't you?

               Mumford turns to see that Althea's thirteen year old daughter 
               KATIE has silently appeared. Her jeans and little tee-shirt 
               are meant to be sexy; it seems sad on her. Mumford nods.

                                     MUMFORD
                         You must be Katie. People call me 
                         Doc.

                                     KATIE
                              (motioning urgently)
                         C'mere. Quick... c'mon!

               Mumford follows as she disappears around the corner of the 
               porch.

               INT. SIDE HALL, BROCKETT HOUSE - MAGIC

               Mumford follows Katie into a gloomy hall from a side entrance. 
               Here too, the walls are lined with boxes. She tiptoes to one 
               of two facing doors and waits for him.

               When he has joined her, she motions him back a foot for 
               safety, then carefully opens the door to a large walk-in 
               closet. Katie's caution becomes understandable: the space is 
               packed so fully and chaotically with catalogue item cartons 
               that it might come tumbling out the door with one careless 
               move. Katie closes the door, then pirouettes to the opposing 
               door, which she swings open freely -- REVEALING: what was 
               once a study is now completely filled with hundreds of 
               cartons, in an infinite variety of shapes and sizes.

               Mumford is taken aback. Katie points at packages and speaks 
               in a hypnotic WHISPER --

                                     KATIE
                         Cuddledown... Linen & Lace... Scully 
                         & Scully... Smith & Hawken... Plow & 
                         Hearth... Museum of Modern Art... 
                         Smithsonian Museum... J. Crew... 
                         Wolferman's... Hold Everything... 
                         Nieman Marcus... Coldwater Creek... 
                         Garnett Hill... Norm Thompson... 
                         Victoria's Secret... Sharper Image... 
                         Hammacher Schlemmer...

               EXT. REAR VERANDA, BROCKETT HOUSE - MAGIC

               Just as Mumford and Katie come back around the corner, MARTIN, 
               Althea's sixteen year old son, crosses the yard and comes up 
               onto the porch. He's wearing an old black leather jacket 
               with a lot of zippers, dirty jeans and black Converse All-
               Stars that are coming apart. In his hand, casually but 
               properly held, is a .22 caliber rifle. He looks Mumford over.

                                     MARTIN
                         Is this him?

                                     KATIE
                              (nods)
                         I showed him.

                                     MARTIN
                              (to Mumford)
                         Do you get it now? This is no joke.

               Mumford takes them both in and nods. He understands. Suddenly, 
               their manner changes, for the worse. What they can see that 
               Mumford cannot is JEREMY BROCKETT, Althea's husband, who has 
               come to the back screen door, with the bustle of a late 
               arrival.

                                     JEREMY
                         Hey, kids. Oh, hi.

               Seeing Mumford, Jeremy steps out onto the porch to shake his 
               hand. Jeremy is quite handsome and a fantastic dresser; his 
               Armani outfit cost $4200 all in. His tone: hearty and strained --

                                     JEREMY
                         You must be Dr. Mumford of Mumford. 
                         Jeremy Brockett.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Doc. Nice to meet you.

                                     JEREMY
                         Sorry I'm late... traffic was a 
                         motherfucker. Have another drink, 
                         I'll be back in five.

               Jeremy goes inside. Martin and Katie exchange a look with 
               each other, then to Mumford. Martin goes inside.

                                                               DISSOLVE TO:

               EXT. REAR VERANDA, BROCKETT HOUSE - NIGHT

               LATER. Dinner is over. Jeremy comes out onto the veranda 
               carrying two Cuban cigars. His casual outfit is as stylish 
               and pricey as his work outfit. He joins Mumford and Althea, 
               who immediately gets up.

                                     ALTHEA
                         I'll be back.

               She goes inside. The men each have a snifter of cognac. Jeremy 
               makes a ceremony of cutting the cigars --

                                     JEREMY
                         I think you'll like this. Know much 
                         about Cuban cigars?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Nope.

               Jeremy puts the cigars down, pulls a joint out of his cashmere 
               pullover and fires it up. After exhaling a huge cloud of 
               smoke, he offers the joint to Mumford, who declines.

                                     JEREMY
                         Makes the whole thing that much 
                         better.

               Jeremy takes another hit on the joint and puts it down. He 
               gives a cigar and his gold lighter to Mumford, who begins to 
               light up --

                                     JEREMY
                         Just hold the flame a little bit 
                         below the end... that's it... now 
                         just turn it slowly as you draw...

               Mumford does as he's told. Jeremy lights his own cigar.

                                     JEREMY
                         Are you a man who likes to treat 
                         himself right?

                                     MUMFORD
                         I've had my moments.

                                     JEREMY
                         I am. And I'm not ashamed of it. 
                         Nobody ever said on their death bed -- 
                         "I treated myself too well."

                                     MUMFORD
                         I thought it was -- Nobody ever said, 
                         "I should have spent more time at 
                         the office."

                                     JEREMY
                         Fill in the blank. I don't mind the 
                         office. The point is, you only go 
                         'round once. Like the Zens say -- Be 
                         here now.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What do you do?

                                     JEREMY
                         Althea hasn't told you?

                                     MUMFORD
                              (no)
                         We've been talking about her, mostly.

                                     JEREMY
                         Well, in '85 four of us left our 
                         firms and formed an investment banking 
                         venture. We've got twenty-three people 
                         working there now.

                                     MUMFORD
                         You've done well.

               The marijuana is kicking in now -- Jeremy gets a self-
               satisfied, condescending look on his face that no straight 
               mind would dare. His response includes their lavish immediate 
               surroundings--

                                     JEREMY
                         We've done... very well. You know 
                         anything about addiction, Doc?

                                     MUMFORD
                         A little.

                                     JEREMY
                         Well, I'm addicted to winning. I say 
                         when you're in the red zone, you 
                         gotta score.
                              (watches Mumford smoke)
                         So what do you think?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Tastes good.

                                     JEREMY
                         No... I mean about Althea. About 
                         her...
                              (makes a face)
                         ...behavior. Do you think you can 
                         fix her up?

                                     MUMFORD
                         What do you think's wrong with her?

                                     JEREMY
                         She's gone weird is what's wrong 
                         with her. Out of control. Probably 
                         from living out here in Mayberry.

               Jeremy blows cigar smoke into his snifter, then takes a 
               mouthful of cognac, savoring the sensations. Mumford watches, 
               fascinated by this guy.

                                     JEREMY
                         You're the doctor, what do you think?

                                     MUMFORD
                         She seems very unhappy.

               Jeremy gives him a look, as if to say "duh."

                                     JEREMY
                         I think we all knew that, professor. 
                         The question... the real --
                              (drawn out, stoned)
                         -- quest-tio-nee... is... why?

               Mumford looks at him a long time.

               EXT. ROAD INTO MUMFORD - NIGHT

               Jeremy Brockett's Mercedes 500 SL whips around a curve.

               INT. BROCKETT'S MERCEDES - NIGHT

               Martin is driving Mumford back to town.

                                     MARTIN
                         But you know how to drive?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Sure.

                                     MARTIN
                         Got a license?
                              (yes)
                         But no car?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Don't need it.

                                     MARTIN
                         I just got my license two weeks ago.

                                     MUMFORD
                         You're good.

                                     MARTIN
                         I been drivin' since I was twelve.

                                     MUMFORD
                         That would explain it.

                                     MARTIN
                         Can you help Mom?

                                     MUMFORD
                         I'm trying.

                                     MARTIN
                              (intense)
                         Got to.

               They drive in silence for a bit. Then --

                                     MARTIN
                         Nessa Watkins... She comes to you, 
                         doesn't she? You're treating her, 
                         right?

               Mumford gives him a surprised look, then acknowledges it.

                                     MARTIN
                         What's wrong with her?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Is she a friend of yours?

                                     MARTIN
                         No... sort of. Man, she could be 
                         cool, but all she does is get wrecked 
                         and do all the guys. She's blowin' 
                         them in the parking lot.

               Mumford knew that.

                                     MARTIN
                         A person's got to hate themselves to 
                         act like that.

               Mumford regards Martin with respect, then turns to look out 
               front. After a few moments --

                                     MARTIN
                         Have you ever met a bigger shithead 
                         than my stepfather?

               EXT. THE DUPLEX HOUSE - NIGHT

               Lily is walking Ainge as the Mercedes pulls up and Mumford 
               gets out. Ainge runs happily around the car and puts his 
               paws up on the driver's door to greet Martin; we HEAR the 
               clicking SCRATCH of his nails on the surface. Martin rubs 
               the dog's head.

                                     LILY
                         Ainge!

                                     MARTIN
                         That's okay. Jeremy won't mind. Good 
                         dog.

                                     LILY
                         Ainge!

               The dog obediently leaves Martin and runs back to Lily. 
               Mumford waves as Martin pulls away.

                                     LILY
                              (to Ainge)
                         Do we run into the street? No, I 
                         didn't think so.
                              (looks after Martin)
                         Nice car. How's that place?

                                     MUMFORD
                         It's a pretty piece of land.

               They walk up the block with the dog.

                                     LILY
                         And the Brocketts?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Horror show. What'd you do tonight?

                                     LILY
                         It was insane here, man. 'Hadda call 
                         in the National Guard.
                              (he nods)
                         Then I did my laundry... watched 
                         20/20.

                                     MUMFORD
                         ...And?

                                     LILY
                         Shocking. Did you know the government 
                         is wasteful?
                              (Mumford reacts)
                         You heard it here first. Oh, and 
                         being a supermodel... it's no walk 
                         in the park.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Why do you watch?

                                     LILY
                         No gentleman caller, Doc.
                              (they turn back)
                         Not that I care. I've had it with 
                         men. They're so fascinated by their 
                         own crap. Took me four years to get 
                         the last one out. Almost turned me 
                         into a dyke... These days my idea of 
                         a hot date is a long shower by myself 
                         before bed. Now that feels good. And 
                         you don't have to do all that... 
                         listening.

               Mumford laughs.

                                     LILY
                         Oops... sorry. I guess that's the 
                         story of your life.

               INT. MUMFORD'S OFFICE - DAY

               TIGHT ON COMPUTER SCREEN. A health information "library" 
               website has been called up on Mumford's office computer. 
               Right now it's beginning to spew information about "CHRONIC 
               FATIGUE SYNDROME" -- Definitions, Signs and Symptoms, 
               Diagnostic Measures, etc.

               Mumford is hunched over the computer, reading avidly. His 
               printer is churning out hard copies.

               EXT. FRONT PORCH, COOK HOUSE - DAY

               Mumford comes out the front door and holds it open for Sofie. 
               He offers his arm and she takes it tentatively.

                                     SOFIE
                         I'm not making any promises.

                                     MUMFORD
                         We'll turn back anytime you want.

                                     SOFIE
                              (seeing something)
                         Oh boy... this should be interesting.

               Mumford looks out toward the street. A woman in her fifties 
               is turning into the front walk. She stares at them, unsmiling, 
               as the two parties converge. She is MRS. COOK.

                                     SOFIE
                         Hello, Mother. I want you to meet 
                         Dr. Mumford.

                                     MRS. COOK
                         Mumford... like the town?

                                     MUMFORD
                              (offering his hand)
                         Yes. It's nice to meet you, Mrs. 
                         Cook.

               She finally takes his hand, but it's not friendly.

                                     MRS. COOK
                         What's happening here?

                                     SOFIE
                         We're going for a walk.

                                     MRS. COOK
                         Do you think that's a good idea?

                                     SOFIE
                         Dr. Mumford does, yes. I've put myself 
                         completely in his hands. For today, 
                         anyway.

                                     MRS. COOK
                         What kind of doctor are you?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Ph.D., psychologist.

                                     MRS. COOK
                         Oh... not a real doctor.

                                     MUMFORD
                         That's right, the fake kind.

               Mrs. Cook is not amused. Sofie pulls on Mumford.

                                     SOFIE
                         We'd better go or I'm liable to bail 
                         on the whole thing.

               Mrs. Cook steps aside as they move up the walk.

               EXT. SIDEWALK, NEAR THE COOK HOUSE - DAY

               Mumford and Sofie, foreground, walk slowly up the block. In 
               the background, Mrs. Cook watches for awhile before going 
               inside.

                                     SOFIE
                         Mom's such a cutie.

                                     MUMFORD
                         People usually have to get to know 
                         me before they hate me.

                                     SOFIE
                         She's not in a bad mood. She's like 
                         that all the time.
                              (a beat)
                         It doesn't bother me anymore. It's 
                         my dad and my brother I worry about.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Maybe... but you're the one whose 
                         ass is dragging.

                                     SOFIE
                              (laughs)
                         Is that the technical description of 
                         what I've got?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Is she against you getting help?

                                     SOFIE
                         We don't discuss it.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Something's bothering her.

                                     SOFIE
                         Oh, we've all disappointed her. Me, 
                         especially, but Dad, of course. She 
                         thinks my brother's all right, but 
                         she didn't expect much. It's what 
                         happens when you "marry beneath 
                         yourself"...

               Sofie suddenly seems to be fading.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Please... forgive me.

                                     SOFIE
                         What?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Negative thinking makes everything 
                         more difficult. If you're going to 
                         have enough strength to do this, we 
                         have to talk only about positive 
                         things. All right?

               She looks at him, unsure if he's serious. It seems so corny. 
               But she agrees.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Okay then... Are you positive your 
                         mother's a bitch?
                              (she laughs, surprised)
                         Just kidding.

                                     SOFIE
                         You've got a funny idea of funny.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (seems worried)
                         I've offended you!

                                     SOFIE
                         No.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Really? What would it take?

               She laughs again; surprised again. He's got her off balance 
               makes a "rim shot" sound.

                                     SOFIE
                         Is this the treatment?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Sorry... I'm done.

                                     SOFIE
                         'Cause I'll tell you, none of the 
                         others have tried this approach.

               They've come to the corner. He gestures to ask -- "shall we 
               cross?" She considers for quite a while, gauging her strength, 
               then, still on his arm, steps off the curb --

                                     SOFIE
                              (absurdly unconvincing)
                         Hey, 'Just do it!'

               THEY CROSS OUT OF FRAME as we HEAR:

                                     MUMFORD (O.S.)
                         I want you to tell me all your 
                         symptoms.

               EXT. PATH BY RIVER - DAY

               ANOTHER DAY. They're dressed differently. Sofie seems more 
               vigorous.

                                     SOFIE
                         I'm embarrassed. The list is so long.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Be specific.

                                     SOFIE
                         Well... I'm tired all the time, 
                         obviously. I always feel like taking 
                         a nap. But when I try to sleep, I 
                         have trouble.
                              (Mumford nods)
                         My muscles ache. And my joints. I 
                         feel like an old person, or like I 
                         did back when I used to work out too 
                         hard... What else?...

               INT. MUMFORD'S OFFICE - DAY

               CLOSE ON COMPUTER SCREEN. Under the list of Signs and 
               Symptoms: "Sore throat."

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         Sore throat?

                                     SOFIE (V.O.)
                         Uh-huh.

               ON THE SCREEN: "Low grade fever... Painful lymph glands... 
               Irritability..."

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         Low grade fever?

               EXT. PATH BY RIVER - DAY

               Sofie nods.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Painful lymph glands?
                              (yes)
                         Forget fulness... irritability... 
                         depression?

                                     SOFIE
                         Yes, yes, and definitely yes. Also... 
                         I get confused.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Yeah, most people have that. It's 
                         confusing here.

                                     SOFIE
                         Where?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Life.

               EXT. HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC FIELD - DAY

               ANOTHER DAY. Mumford is leading Sofie through the lightest 
               set of calisthenics ever devised. Now they're doing waist 
               bends and arm waving. Even so, it's taking everything Sofie's 
               got.

                                     SOFIE
                         I don't know if I mentioned the 
                         headaches.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Did you get headaches before this?
                              (Sofie: yes)
                         But you get more now? Or more severe?

                                     SOFIE
                         No, not really. They're about the 
                         same. My marriage was one long 
                         headache.

                                     MUMFORD
                         So the headaches may not even be a 
                         part of this?

               She considers that, reluctantly agrees.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I can give myself a headache 
                         instantly.

                                     SOFIE
                         Is that like a party trick?

                                     MUMFORD
                         All I have to do is have two 
                         conflicting thoughts at the same 
                         time... Like I'll think -- 'Taking 
                         these walks is going to help Sofie 
                         get better.' But then I'll also think -- 
                         'Mumford, you just enjoy taking these 
                         walks and you're kidding yourself 
                         about the benefits.'

               Sofie's not sure how to take that. She looks away.

                                     MUMFORD
                         There... I've given myself a real 
                         whopper.

                                     SOFIE
                         You actually address yourself by 
                         name in your thoughts?
                              (Mumford laughs)
                         So you really think having two 
                         opposing ideas in your head does 
                         some kind of damage?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Sometimes, yeah... pulling in two 
                         different directions at once. It 
                         makes tiny little tears in our fabric.

                                     SOFIE
                         Well then, my life has been some 
                         kind of huge rip.

               INT. BOARDING HOUSE (IN HENRY FOLLETT'S FANTASY) - DAY

               The handsome Newcomer of Follett's fantasy comes down the 
               steps from the attic wearing a sleeveless undershirt, towel 
               thrown over his shoulder. He goes into the bathroom off the 
               second floor hall and begins to wash up. [Again, Follett's 
               fantasy world is in BLACK & WHITE.]

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         The town was a rube's heaven, but I 
                         found work my first day out down at 
                         Old Man Sutter's gas station and 
                         diner. I knew his stacked young wife 
                         was going to be a problem, but, hey, 
                         life is full of problems. Back at 
                         the boarding house, I was washing up 
                         when I heard a load of yellin' and --

               IN THE BATHROOM MIRROR, the Newcomer's POV: a nubile teenager, 
               17 going on 35, in a tight cheerleader's outfit, comes up 
               the stairs and stops at the top to turn and yell back down 
               at her mother. Her dialogue distant and echoey:

                                     LANDLADY'S DAUGHTER
                         ...get off my case! You don't like 
                         any of my friends...

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         ...I got my first look at the 
                         landlady's daughter.

               The LANDLADY'S DAUGHTER looks up and sees the Newcomer 
               watching her through the half-open bathroom door. She gives 
               him a petulant, white-hot look, then turns on her heel and 
               goes into her room at that end of the hall. She bangs her 
               door behind her, but it bounces open again about a foot. The 
               Newcomer, still watching in the bathroom mirror, now has a 
               view of the bureau mirror in the Landlady's Daughter's room. 
               In there, seemingly oblivious, the girl quickly strips off 
               the top of her outfit, revealing a '50's-era white bra.

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         Lucky for me, she was plenty upset 
                         but not too careful.

               Suddenly, in mirror reflection of mirror, the Landlady's 
               Daughter meets the Newcomer's smoldering stare and her lip 
               begins to curl.

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         Or maybe it wasn't an accident at 
                         all --

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         Mr. Follett.

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         -- 'cause in that instant I saw the 
                         beginning of a vixen's smile and I 
                         knew --

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         Henry!

               Mysteriously, the door to the girl's bedroom slams shut, 
               cutting off the Newcomer's view. He looks with surprise into 
               his mirror -- it suddenly shatters.

               INT. MUMFORD'S OFFICE - DAY

               Follett sits up abruptly on the couch and twists toward 
               Mumford, agitated.

                                     FOLLETT
                         What?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Stop now.

                                     FOLLETT
                         Why? I'm paying for this.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Not for this. Not me, you're not.

                                     FOLLETT
                              (challenging)
                         You find it distasteful, don't you?

                                     MUMFORD
                         It doesn't matter how I feel about 
                         it. It's how you feel about it that 
                         matters.

                                     FOLLETT
                         I enjoy it. Does that make me some 
                         kind of pervert? Just because a man 
                         has a rich imaginative life --

                                     MUMFORD
                         You didn't come to me because you 
                         have a rich imagination.

                                     FOLLETT
                         No?

                                     MUMFORD
                         You came because it's taking over. 
                         You're in its grip.

                                     FOLLETT
                         I never said that.

               Mumford's tone suddenly picks up a touch of steel.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Where's your wife, Henry?

               Follett flinches, settles back down onto the couch, sulking.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Where's your wife, Henry?

                                     FOLLETT
                         Go to hell.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (softer)
                         I didn't hear you.

               Follett mutters something to himself, then is silent until --

                                     FOLLETT
                         We got divorced.
                              (petulant)
                         I had to get rid of her. She couldn't 
                         satisfy me.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (shouts, Follett jumps)
                         What?!

               Follett seems to shrink in size. They've been here before 
               and he doesn't like it.

                                     FOLLETT
                              (softly)
                         I was... never satisfied.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (normal again)
                         Now we're back on track.

               Again, Follett says something under his breath.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What's that?

                                     FOLLETT
                              (long beat)
                         You are so mean.

               EXT. HIKING TRAIL - MAGIC

               Mumford strides up the trail on his late day excursion. He 
               comes around a bend and is surprised to find Skip waiting 
               for him, looking serious.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Hey, Skip.

                                     SKIP
                         Doc. I know we're not supposed to 
                         get together till Wednesday...

                                     MUMFORD
                         That's all right. What's on your 
                         mind?

               Mumford indicates that Skip should walk with him up the trail.

                                     SKIP
                         How many sessions have we had now, 
                         Doc?
                              (Mumford tries to 
                              remember)
                         Six. And it's been good... like we 
                         were two buddies hanging out. Just 
                         shootin' the shit.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Yep.

               They walk in silence for a while.

                                     SKIP
                         This is really hard. Everything I 
                         want to say is hard...

               EXT. BIG ROCK LOOKOUT POINT - MAGIC

               Mumford and Skip come out of the trees, climb onto the big 
               rock, and settle down. The sun is falling over the town of 
               Mumford.

                                     SKIP
                         ...We're like friends, almost... who 
                         trust each other.

               He checks Mumford's reaction. Mumford nods, offers Skip water, 
               who turns it down. Mumford takes a swig.

                                     SKIP
                         I want to tell you something, Doc, 
                         but before I do, I need to ask you a 
                         question... Because, for me to tell 
                         you this thing -- well, I haven't 
                         told anybody about this. It's the 
                         biggest secret I've got.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Sometimes it's best to keep a few 
                         things just for ourselves.

                                     SKIP
                         You're a shrink, Doc. Aren't I 
                         supposed to be able to tell you 
                         everything?

                                     MUMFORD
                         It's just a thought.

               Skip, even more unsure now, looks away, at the town below.

                                     SKIP
                         That really relates to the thing I 
                         want to ask you... I've noticed that 
                         sometimes, not a lot, but sometimes, 
                         when we're hanging out, throwin' the 
                         ball... or that time we went 
                         bowling... sometimes you'll like --
                              (gets it out fast --)
                         -- tell me things about your other 
                         patients.

               Mumford lets that hang a few moments, then acknowledges it 
               silently. Now Skip is even more nervous.

                                     SKIP
                         Hey, maybe that's all right! I don't 
                         know all that much about psychology 
                         or therapy or... ethics, so maybe 
                         there's something I missed... or 
                         something...

                                     MUMFORD
                         You're concerned that maybe I can't 
                         be trusted with a secret.

                                     SKIP
                         I trust you. Definitely. No question. 
                         But, yeah, I'm a little concerned. I 
                         mean, you're not supposed to tell 
                         anyone about your patients' 
                         problems... are you?

               Mumford looks at Skip for a long moment.

                                     MUMFORD
                         That is correct, Skip. I'm going to 
                         have to take a long look at that.

               The conversation seems to end there. Skip's not sure where 
               to go next. Finally --

                                     SKIP
                         Yeah, well... what I was gonna tell 
                         you --

                                     MUMFORD
                         -- Skip. Knowing what you do about 
                         me --

                                     SKIP
                         Doc, I trust you! You've listened to 
                         me better than anybody... maybe ever.
                              (leans in, intense)
                         And this secret I've got, I can't 
                         stand it anymore. I don't know if 
                         I'm some kind of --

               Skip looks around at the darkening woods, though clearly 
               there's no one around.

                                     SKIP
                         -- I don't know if I'm a pervert or 
                         what. It's taken me this long to get 
                         where I can come out and say it... I 
                         can't back away now. I can't spend 
                         another day not knowing if I'm nuts.

               Skip closes his eyes for a second and gathers himself.

                                     SKIP
                         All right, I'm just gonna tell you, 
                         as simple and direct as I can.
                              (one last spasm of 
                              doubt)
                         And you understand that this is a 
                         big secret? Just between us?
                              (Mumford does)
                         Okay. You know I've got this gift 
                         for certain kinds of... machines.

                                     MUMFORD
                         You are Panda, monarch of modems.

                                     SKIP
                         That's right. And you also know that 
                         even though I make 23% of the modems 
                         in the world... I cannot make one 
                         simple connection with any woman who 
                         could truly love me.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Okay... let's say that, for now.

                                     SKIP
                         It's true, believe me. So... do you 
                         know what I've been doing, all alone, 
                         in my workshop, for almost two 
                         years?... Mr. Find-the-Need-and-Fill-
                         It. How I spend my every solitary 
                         hour?

               Mumford shakes his head, "no."

                                     SKIP
                         Guess.
                              (Mumford demurs)
                         Go ahead, guess!

                                     MUMFORD
                              (if he must)
                         Jerking off?

                                     SKIP
                         No!... Although that's a good guess. 
                         No, what I've been working on, what 
                         the world really needs and no one 
                         has been able to create --
                              (leans in, whispering)
                         -- a virtually life-like, humanoid, 
                         gender-specific, anatomically 
                         functional... sexual surrogate slash 
                         companion.

               Mumford tries to put that all together. Finally --

                                     MUMFORD
                         Slash what?

                                     SKIP
                         Sexual surrogate... slash... 
                         companion.

                                     MUMFORD
                         A doll?

                                     SKIP
                         No, Doc, not a doll. I am Panda. I'm 
                         talking about much, much more than a 
                         doll. The world has never seen what 
                         I'm talking about... except maybe in 
                         the movies.

               Mumford considers that a long time, watching as the sun 
               finally sinks below the horizon. He looks back at Skip.

                                     MUMFORD
                         How's it coming?

                                     SKIP
                         You don't think I'm insane?

                                     MUMFORD
                              ("no")
                         And that's your secret?
                              (Skip: "yes")
                         You meant -- like a trade secret?

                                     SKIP
                         No, Doc, a private secret! It's 
                         perverted, it's pitiful. What am I -- 
                         Dr. Frankenstein? Aren't you repulsed?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Sounds like kind of a good idea.

                                     SKIP
                              (nonplussed)
                         Really?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Definitely.

               It's getting dark fast now. Mumford reaches into his bag and 
               takes out the headlamp we saw earlier. He fits the straps 
               carefully over his head.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Skip, that's not much of a secret.

                                     SKIP
                              (hurt)
                         It's not?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Oh, it's okay. It's just not something 
                         to be ashamed of. Maybe you don't 
                         want people knowing -- and believe 
                         me, it's safe with me -- but on the 
                         scale of dirty little secrets, I'd 
                         give it, say... a two.

               Mumford twists the headlamp and the light shines out in the 
               dusk. Mumford turns the beam directly at Skip.

                                     MUMFORD
                         You want to know a secret? I'll tell 
                         you a secret. Since it's just between 
                         us and all...

               Skip, hanging on every word now, agrees emphatically.

                                     MUMFORD
                         The secret, Skip, is this -- I am 
                         not now, nor have I ever been... a 
                         psychologist.

               At first, Skip thinks he's misunderstood Mumford. But in the 
               huge silence that ensues, he replays it and knows he's heard 
               right. Mumford looks around, adjusts his headlamp, and gets 
               up.

                                     MUMFORD
                         We'd better get going. Just follow 
                         my light. And, Skip, watch your step.

               EXT. MUMFORD'S PORCH, THE DUPLEX HOUSE - NIGHT

               This porch is directly above Lily's porch. Mumford and Skip 
               sit nursing beers. There's a cooler on the floor. Mumford's 
               legs are propped up on the porch railing

                                     SKIP
                         Who else knows?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Just you.

                                     SKIP
                         It's time you did some talkin', Dr. 
                         Mum -- Wait a minute. That is your 
                         name, isn't it?

               Mumford takes a drink of beer.

                                     SKIP
                         Damn! What is your name?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Doesn't matter. You can call me Doc.

                                     SKIP
                         It matters to me.

               Mumford gestures: "sorry, no can do."

                                     SKIP
                         I've told you a lot of private stuff.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I can tell you anything else.

                                     SKIP
                         What about everything? How did this 
                         happen?

               Mumford looks at Skip, considering. He takes a long pull 
               from his beer, then looks at the frosty bottle.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Did you know that every species of 
                         mammal has found some way to drug, 
                         inebriate, or anestnetize itself? 
                         Even if it's just banging its head 
                         against a rock. Seems to be some 
                         natural urge... to get away for a 
                         while.
                              (one more look at 
                              Skip)
                         I've had it for as long as I can 
                         remember. The first place I wanted 
                         out of was home...

               AS MUMFORD TALKS we SEE IMAGES FROM HIS PAST, all FROM 
               MUMFORD'S POV. We do not see him in the scenes. Instead, 
               everyone else in the scene RELATES TO THE CAMERA AS MUMFORD, 
               even if they're just ignoring him.

               EXT. MUMFORD'S CHILDHOOD HOME, BALD KNOB, WEST VIRGINIA - 
               MAGIC

               MOVING FAST (MUMFORD'S CHILDHOOD POV) toward the back door 
               of a rundown, little house in a poor mining community. We 
               reach the back door and bang inside --

               INT. MUMFORD'S CHILDHOOD HOME - MAGIC

               The cramped interior is grimy and depressing. MUMFORD'S MOTHER 
               worse for wear, has just put a glass of liquor on the sink 
               and returned her attention to the smoking stovetop. She 
               glances briefly at Mumford and greets him pleasantly, clearly 
               drunk. Suddenly, her attention shifts and we -- PAN TO THE 
               FRONT DOOR which is opened roughly by MUMFORD'S FATHER, a 
               coal miner whose face still shows the grime of his work. But 
               it's his scary scowl that impresses. His eyes take in his 
               wife (and her drink) but he says nothing. He barely gives 
               Mumford a glance as he drops his lunch pail on the table and 
               disappears into another room.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         I thought I had the best parents in 
                         Bald Knob, West Virginia... till I 
                         was seven years old and got a look 
                         at some others. They weren't bad 
                         folks...

               AT THE DINNER TABLE. Across the table, MUMFORD'S OLDER SISTER 
               eats with her head down. On the right, Mumford's Mother is 
               picking at her food. Mumford's POV shifts to his Father, who 
               is yelling something at his wife.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         ...but they were real unhappy about 
                         being who they were...

               Now, his Father looks suddenly at Mumford; his hand shoots 
               out to slap Mumford's face, and the IMAGE GOES BLACK, then 
               immediately FADES UP AGAIN on --

               INT. HIGH SCHOOL CLASSROOM, WEST VIRGINIA - DAY

               TIGHT ON A TEST PAPER being laid on an old-fashioned student 
               desk. Scrawled in red pencil at the top: "A -- Outstanding!"

               TILT UP to the old classroom, full of kids getting their 
               tests back. ACROSS THE AISLE, looking at camera with disgust, 
               is a sixteen year old boy, MUMFORD'S CLASSMATE.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         It made no sense that school came 
                         easy for me... I didn't do much work, 
                         and there was a proud tradition in 
                         my family of being really dumb. My 
                         friends didn't like it much. It made 
                         them distrust me...

               EXT. FOOTBALL FIELD - NIGHT

               FROM INSIDE A HELMET: the brutal chaos of crashing bodies in 
               a Friday night high school football game. Mumford is violently 
               hit. Our view is smashed so deep into the muddy turf that 
               again the IMAGE GOES BLACK, then quickly FADES UP AGAIN on --

               INT./EXT. LOVER'S LANE, WOODS - NIGHT

               TIGHT ON A CAN OF "IRON CITY" BEER in MUMFORD'S POV as he 
               puts it on the roof of a green Nash Rambler and ducks into 
               the back seat. In the shadows is a teen-age girl, MUMFORD'S 
               DATE. As Mumford moves toward her, she flames a Bic lighter 
               and gleefully lights a fat joint; her blouse is unbuttoned 
               and gaping.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         On the other hand, it made some of 
                         my classmates like me better... I 
                         don't know what it was in me, maybe 
                         some genes from my mom, maybe some 
                         discomfort with myself, but early on 
                         I was drawn to any substance that 
                         made me numb...

               EXT. HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL FIELD - DAY

               Graduation Ceremonies. MUMFORD'S POV moving across a platform 
               toward the diploma being proffered by the PRINCIPAL. PAN TO 
               Mumford's Parents, dressed up and proud, in the audience.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         When I got a scholarship to go out 
                         of state to college, I was the first 
                         one in my extended family who'd gone 
                         beyond high school. At graduation, 
                         my folks looked like a normal, happy 
                         couple, which I guess they were about 
                         10% of the time... out in public.

               INT. UNIVERSITY DORMITORY HALLWAY - DAY

               TIGHT ON A DORM ROOM DOOR as it is pushed open. MUMFORD'S 
               NEW ROOMMATE, a crazed, middle-class doper, has his stuff 
               spread around and is settled in the midst of the chaos. He 
               looks up at the arriving Mumford with a maniacal, stoned 
               smile.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         My roommate was from a planet I had 
                         never heard of called Scarsdale, 
                         where everything was the opposite of 
                         West Virginia...

               INT. COLLEGE APARTMENT - NIGHT

               TIGHT ON A BONG filling with white smoke. We FOLLOW IT UP 
               THE TUBE to a PRETTY COED, who inhales deeply, then blows a 
               seductive cloud directly at Mumford. The room is full of 
               partying students.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         All the other kids, in fact, seemed 
                         to know things I didn't. They were 
                         friendly enough, but in four years, 
                         I never got over feeling that I had 
                         sneaked in... and was about to be 
                         exposed as the hillbilly and imposter 
                         I actually was.

               INT. BEDROOM, STUDENT APARTMENT - NIGHT

               Funky decor, red scarf over the lamp creating a sexy glow. 
               MUMFORD'S POV moves toward an undulating shape hidden by a 
               sheet on the bed. He reaches out and lifts the edge to REVEAL 
               the Pretty Coed, now naked, giggling, her extended hand 
               offering a tab of acid right up to camera.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         The thing that always made those 
                         feelings go away was... fun. Fun was 
                         drugs, fun was sex, fun was 
                         aggressively doing nothing. The only 
                         problem I had with degenerate, self-
                         destructive behavior was... I couldn't 
                         get enough of it.

               INT. UNIVERSITY CLASSROOM - DAY

               A PROFESSOR approaches camera and lays a fresh examination 
               on the desk in front of Mumford. The problem is -- Mumford 
               is so doped up the classroom is swimming and the examination 
               paper keeps changing shape.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         All that fun eventually had an impact 
                         on the work I was doing. I figured, 
                         what the hell, it was only college, 
                         after all. I'd straighten up when I 
                         went out in the real world...

               INT. OFFICE BUILDING CORRIDOR - NIGHT

               TIGHT ON SEVERAL AMPHETAMINE CAPSULES being dumped into 
               Mumford's palm over a water fountain. They disappear toward 
               camera as we dip down toward the stream of water.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         I didn't want to jump into my career 
                         right out of college. And since I 
                         had no career, that turned out to be 
                         not much of a problem...

               MUMFORD'S POV lifts from the fountain and turns to the 
               endless, deserted corridor of the huge building. We begin 
               TRACKING DOWN the hall, checking out the various doorways. A 
               Cleaning Crew appears far up ahead.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         I had a series of challenging jobs 
                         over the next few years...

               EXT. ALLEY - DAY

               We PAN from the back of a garbage truck to a mess of garbage 
               containers, and MOVE TOWARD THEM.

               INT. GAS STATION - NIGHT

               TIGHT ON TWO LINES of cocaine. We DIP TOWARD THEM, then UP 
               AGAIN and they're gone. PAN to REVEAL we're in a closet off 
               the brightly-lit office of an all-night gas station. A PATRON 
               is waiting impatiently out by the pumps.

               EXT. SECOND FLOOR PORCH, THE DUPLEX HOUSE - NIGHT

               BACK TO PRESENT. Skip watches Mumford intently.

                                     MUMFORD
                         ...pizza delivery, pipe fitting, 
                         pest control... lots of jobs that 
                         started with the letter "p". For 
                         some reason, I kept losing these 
                         jobs.
                              (takes a swig of beer)
                         The only mind-altering substance I 
                         never had a problem with was alcohol. 
                         I never got drunk. I didn't like the 
                         feeling. But really, when you're as 
                         fucked up as I was... big deal.

               Mumford stands up and stretches, then sits on the railing 
               facing Skip.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Eventually, doing all these different 
                         jobs, I noticed something. For some 
                         reason, probably because I was too 
                         stoned to talk, everywhere I went --

               INT./EXT. SERIES OF SHOTS-- TALKING HEADS

               We see various CO-WORKERS from Mumford's jobs. The 
               environments are radically different, but the activity is 
               always the same -- the Co-Worker in question is pouring his 
               heart out to camera.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         -- people would talk to me, tell me 
                         everything... their stories, their 
                         problems, their innermost thoughts. 
                         Sometimes they'd pretend they needed 
                         advice, but mostly people just wanted 
                         someone to listen.

               INT. CRAWLSPACE UNDER HOUSE - DAY

               MUMFORD'S MOVING POV as he crawls into the darkness, an 
               insecticide sprayer ahead of him. He pushes at a cinderblock --

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         Anyway, one day I was spraying for 
                         termites when I had a vision --

               The cinderblock tips over and a swarm of scary-looking spiders 
               comes rushing out toward camera.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         -- it was time to put my college 
                         degree to work and get a job with a 
                         desk.

                                                              SMASH CUT TO:

               INT. GOVERNMENT OFFICES - DAY

               FROM BEHIND A DESK in the middle of a huge sea of desks.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         I took the civil service exam and 
                         found myself working at the Internal 
                         Revenue Service, District 14, Central 
                         Administrative Office. I started off 
                         as a general records clerk...

               SERIES OF SHOTS: computer records scrolling rapidly, paper 
               files being pulled, documents being routed.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         I guess the standards weren't too 
                         high there, because my superiors got 
                         excited and pushed me to take the 
                         advancement tests...

               INT. YMCA GYM - NIGHT

               An intense basketball game. The ball zips from behind camera 
               (Mumford) to an older guy, MUMFORD'S SUPERVISOR, under the 
               basket; he lays it in easily, then comes over to high-five.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         One guy in particular thought I should 
                         be a Revenue Officer. There was more 
                         money to be made as your 
                         classification went up. Which had a 
                         lot of appeal to me...

               INT. KITCHEN TABLE, MUMFORD'S CITY APARTMENT (PAST) - NIGHT

               A COCAINE MILL is loaded with white chunks and screwed shut 
               in MUMFORD'S POV; the steady grinding begins. Spread across 
               the messy kitchen table is the regular user's paraphernalia.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         ...since, even though I was certain 
                         I could stop anytime I wanted, I had 
                         developed a real affection for 
                         cocaine. It was my favorite hobby I 
                         had ever had.

               INT. INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE OFFICES - DAY

               MUMFORD'S POV SHIFTS around the office. First, he's looking 
               at an irate TAXPAYER yelling across a desk at a REVENUE 
               OFFICER, who remains unruffled --

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         But I sure didn't want to be a Revenue 
                         Officer, where you were face to face 
                         abusing -- and getting abused -- all 
                         day long...

               His POV PANS with a couple of intense COLLECTION AGENTS who 
               pass behind the first scene on their way out of the offices.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         ...And being a Collection Agent was 
                         definitely not in my genetic make-
                         up...

               His POV STOPS, letting the Collection Agents go, on another 
               fellow, with the disreputable, cocksure demeanor of a private 
               dick, who is lolling near the water cooler, watching the 
               altercation with amusement. He is GREGORY, an IRS 
               INVESTIGATOR.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         But there was one job that looked 
                         like it might be fun -- Investigator.

                                     SKIP (V.O.)
                         Are you telling me your last job 
                         before becoming a psychologist was --

               EXT. SECOND FLOOR PORCH, THE DUPLEX HOUSE - NIGHT

               BACK TO PRESENT. Skip is leaning intensely toward Mumford.

                                     SKIP
                         -- an investigator for the Internal 
                         Revenue Service?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Everybody has a story, Skip.

                                     SKIP
                         Sounds like you have several.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What it felt like was... a series of 
                         separate, unconnected lives -- 
                         hillbilly kid, wrecked college boy, 
                         garbage man, civil service guy...
                              (Yul Brynner accent)
                         ...et cetera... et cetera. Every 
                         time I'd leave a life, it felt good. 
                         Whatever problems I was having were 
                         suddenly gone. I had no friends and 
                         I didn't talk to my family. The only 
                         constant, stabilizing force in my 
                         life was... drugs.

                                     SKIP
                         An IRS investigator with a drug 
                         problem?

                                     MUMFORD
                         It wasn't the best situation.

                                     SKIP
                         Did you carry a gun?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Didn't need one. We didn't even need 
                         a warrant for most of the shit we 
                         did. Man, the IRS... we could go in 
                         your bank account, your credit 
                         cards... hell, we used to go into 
                         doctors' files and get all the juicy 
                         details. Nobody wants to argue with 
                         the IRS.

               EXT. ALLEY, REAR OF DRY CLEANING FACILITY - MAGIC

               MOVING POV as Mumford follows GREGORY down the gloomy alley 
               to a corner where they can spy at the scene beyond.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         I got teamed with one of the top 
                         guys, a fanatic named Gregory. He 
                         always got his man, whether they 
                         deserved it or not. He was a "closer" 
                         and everybody admired that...

               WHAT THEY SEE: The DRY CLEANING BOSS, a Middle-Eastern fellow, 
               is standing at the back door of his place paying his Asian 
               employees in cash as they leave.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         He'd make the case and the Collection 
                         guys would come in and clean up. Our 
                         specialty was... sleazy skulking...

               Gregory turns to look at camera (Mumford) with a devilish 
               grin.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         We were a good team. I was a dope 
                         addict and Gregory was insane.

               INT. GREGORY'S HOUSE, CITY STREET - NIGHT

               MUMFORD'S POV as he supports a drunken Gregory as they stagger 
               down the sidewalk to a row house. Holding Gregory up on the 
               other side, is CANDY, Gregory's pretty wife. They wrangle 
               Gregory up the front steps. Gregory stumbles inside and 
               Mumford retreats down the steps, his eyes still on the front 
               door. Candy appears there and stares down at Mumford, who 
               stops where he is.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         Of course, him being insane didn't 
                         make it all right that I fell in 
                         love with his wife.

                                     SKIP (V.O.)
                         Holy shit!

               EXT. SECOND FLOOR PORCH, THE DUPLEX HOUSE - NIGHT

               Mumford settles back in his chair as Skip shakes his head, 
               astounded.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (announcer-like)
                         "Get to know your therapist."

                                     SKIP
                         You were messed up, man.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (dry)
                         But look at me now...

                                     SKIP
                         Hey, you've done good. Look at 
                         yourself... you've cleaned up, you've 
                         got a career --

               Skip stops, remembers the truth, realizes. Mumford smiles.

                                     SKIP
                         At least you pulled yourself out...

                                     MUMFORD
                         Things got a lot worse.

                                     SKIP
                         You and Candy...?

               INT. BEDROOM, MUMFORD'S CITY APARTMENT - DAY

               MUMFORD'S POV from his bed. Candy finishes dressing across 
               the room. She looks at camera, her face full of the pain of 
               leaving.

               EXT. FIRESCAPE/ROOF, BUILDING IN CITY - DAY

               MOVING POV as Mumford follows Gregory up the ladder and onto 
               the roof of this old building in a rundown industrial 
               neighborhood.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         The way the District Managers got 
                         ahead and won their bonuses was by 
                         generating maximum payments. That 
                         meant the revenue officers had to 
                         use all their "collection tools" -- 
                         seizures, liens, levies -- even if a 
                         more reasonable compromise could 
                         have been worked out. The best way 
                         to reduce resistance from the 
                         taxpayers was to build a convincing 
                         case -- whether there'd actually 
                         been a violation or not...

               Mumford follows Gregory, crawling, to the edge of the roof 
               and looks down on a building one block over. It is a small 
               furniture factory. Employees are eating their lunches on the 
               loading dock.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         That's where we came in. Our DM was 
                         a particular sonuvabitch, and he 
                         knew just how to get Gregory crazy.

               INT. ETHNIC RESTAURANT - NIGHT

               MUMFORD'S POV takes in his ATTRACTIVE DATE next to him, then 
               PANS TO Candy and Gregory across the table. Everybody's 
               laughing. Candy flashes Mumford a momentary special look. 
               MUMFORD'S POV guiltily PANS TO Gregory. Did he see it?

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         So several things were working on 
                         Gregory when we started building a 
                         case against a furniture maker named 
                         Edmond Worrell...

               EXT. PARKING LOT, FURNITURE FACTORY - MAGIC

               BINOCULAR VIEW of EDMOND WORRELL and MRS. WORRELL as they 
               get in a Cadillac at the end of a workday.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         ...and his family.

               INT. BUSINESS OFFICE, WORRELL FURNITURE FACTORY - NIGHT

               Lit by powerful flashlights, Gregory and Mumford attack the 
               files of the company, both in cabinets and on computer.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         Gregory was acting more and more 
                         irrational. We started doing things 
                         that were over the line even for the 
                         IRS. When I look back on it now, I'm 
                         sure Gregory must have known about 
                         Candy and me. On our team, I had 
                         become...

               INT. MEN'S ROOM, WORRELL FURNITURE FACTORY - NIGHT

               EXTREME CLOSE-UP A LINE OF COCAINE on the top of a toilet 
               tank as it is sucked out of sight.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         ...the responsible one.

               INT. BEDROOM, MUMFORD'S CITY APARTMENT - DAY

               MUMFORD'S POV IS A BLURRY SHAPE until Candy moves up and 
               away, her face sweaty and aroused, torso naked. She's on top 
               of Mumford.

               INT. GOVERNMENT CAR - DAY

               Mumford's POV slides into the passenger seat. Gregory is 
               already sitting in the driver's seat. He stares at Mumford a 
               long time.

               INT. CORRIDOR, SHABBY OFFICE BUILDING - DAY

               Mumford is following Gregory and REVENUE OFFICER MCLURE down 
               the hall. They reach a door with the painted sign: "SAMUEL 
               GORBECK, C.P.A."

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         Sometimes when a case didn't work 
                         out right, Gregory and this Revenue 
                         Officer named McLure would put the 
                         squeeze on the subject's accountant...

               As they start to enter, SOFT CUT TO:

               INT. GORBECK'S INNER OFFICE - DAY

               GORBECK listens, intimidated by McLure, who sits on the 
               accountant's desk, and Gregory, who is moving around the 
               office -- snooping.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         There aren't many accountants who 
                         don't have something to worry about 
                         with the Service...

               INT. IRS OFFICES - DAY

               Edmond Worrell, his wife, his adult SON and DAUGHTER, 
               WORRELL'S LAWYER, and, finally, the accountant Gorbeck are 
               ushered toward a conference room by McLure, Gregory and some 
               other IRS types. Gorbeck sneaks a nervous look at Mumford. 
               Gregory, who now appears slightly mad, motions for Mumford 
               to join them.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         The parties met repeatedly over a 
                         period of months. The IRS offered to 
                         settle for a sizable but, they said, 
                         fair amount. Worrell said he'd done 
                         nothing wrong and threatened to fight 
                         it all the way to Washington. He 
                         seemed pretty strong. I was secretly 
                         pulling for him. McLure and the 
                         District Manager stepped up the 
                         pressure.

               EXT. PARKING LOT, WORRELL FURNITURE FACTORY - DAY

               MOVING POV OUT THE WINDSHIELD of Gregory's government car as 
               it comes speeding into the parking lot. There are two flashing 
               Squad Cars and an Ambulance at the entrance. As Gregory's 
               car hits a speedbump, the IMAGE BEGINS TO SLOW DOWN --

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         What none of us down at the Service 
                         knew was that Edmond Worrell had a 
                         story too... Worrell's was that he'd 
                         been fighting chronic depression for 
                         thirty years. Under the heat of the 
                         investigation, he fell off his 
                         medication. One Tuesday morning, he 
                         went down to the factory early, wrote 
                         his family a letter, then used the 
                         9mm automatic they kept there to 
                         kill himself... The DM dropped the 
                         case that day and started proceedings 
                         to get rid of Gregory...

               The IMAGE HAS SLOWED TO A STILL. It now DISSOLVES TO:

               EXT. GREGORY'S HOUSE, CITY STREET - NIGHT

               Mumford's POV as he comes up the steps. The front door opens 
               before he gets there. Candy, her face bruised, her eyes red, 
               comes into view, she has a suitcase in hand.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         Gregory went home drunk, beat up 
                         Candy and went out to drink some 
                         more. Candy told me she didn't want 
                         to see me again. She hated us both 
                         and she was leaving us both... It 
                         made perfect sense to me. I felt the 
                         same way...

               INT. BEDROOM, MUMFORD'S CITY APARTMENT - NIGHT

               Mumford is frantically, futilely looking for an imagined 
               drug stash. He's ransacked the place and is now throwing the 
               clothes out of a drawer.

               INT. BATHROOM, MUMFORD'S CITY APARTMENT - NIGHT

               Mumford looks desperately through the pill bottles and 
               detritus in his squalid medicine cabinet.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         ...In fact, I was jealous of Candy. 
                         I wanted to leave too, just like 
                         her... get as far away from --

               Giving up, Mumford slams the medicine cabinet shut and FOR 
               THE FIRST TIME SINCE HIS STORY BEGAN, WE SEE MUMFORD in his 
               previous incarnation. And this is probably as bad as he ever 
               looked. He stares at his image in the mirror.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         -- me... as possible.

               EXT. SECOND FLOOR PORCH, THE DUPLEX HOUSE - NIGHT

               Skip is staring at Mumford. Empty beer bottles are lined up 
               on the porch railing.

                                     SKIP
                         And so you did...

               Mumford nods.

                                     SKIP
                         And the drugs?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Harder than I thought. Took me three 
                         tries. But I was highly motivated -- 
                         figured there was no point in leaving 
                         me and taking that along. After two 
                         bomb-outs, I found a place in the 
                         desert...

               INT. DESERT DRUG REHAB CENTER - SUNRISE

               A venetian blind is raised, revealing sunrise over a desert 
               landscape.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         The joint wasn't fancy -- it was run 
                         by an order of monks -- but it worked. 
                         When I got out of there, I was just 
                         about broke...

               EXT. SECOND FLOOR PORCH, THE DUPLEX HOUSE - NIGHT

               Mumford gets up from his chair and moves toward his door.

                                     MUMFORD
                         ...which seemed perfect for starting 
                         something new. Be back.

               Mumford goes inside. Skip sits listening to the night. From 
               downstairs, in Lily's apartment, he HEARS A SHOWER GO ON. 
               Mumford comes back out.

                                     SKIP
                         Somebody's taking a shower down there.

                                     MUMFORD
                         That'd be Lily.

                                     SKIP
                         I wish I could live in the shower. 
                         I'd take five a day if I had the 
                         time. I went to this spa in Germany, 
                         a sanitarium practically, up on this 
                         mountain. And the great thing -- 
                         they just kept you wet all day.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Who'd you go with?
                              (Skip: "alone")
                         That's not good.

                                     SKIP
                         How'd you do it?
                              (Mumford is confused)
                         The new you.

                                     MUMFORD
                         You know how easy it is. A kid can 
                         manage it if he wants a fake I.D. 
                         You can do practically the whole 
                         deal at your local Kinko's. The only 
                         variable is how much pride you take 
                         in the product.

                                     SKIP
                         I know it starts with a birth 
                         certificate...

                                     MUMFORD
                         All new people start with that...

               INT. ANONYMOUS WORK ROOM - DAY

               ON A COMPUTER SCREEN an elaborate graphics program is creating 
               the filigreed border of a birth certificate that already 
               bears the official-looking designs of "Green County, State 
               of West Virginia".

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         With desktop publishing, you don't 
                         have to deal with printers, supply 
                         houses, or pesky government agencies. 
                         Eventually you do have to get your 
                         hands on a typewriter. Ever seen one 
                         of those, Skip?

               As the border is completed, we PUSH IN and DISSOLVE THROUGH 
               TO:

               SURFACE OF A DESK, with an electric Smith-Corona typewriter 
               (late '50's vintage). EXTREME CLOSE-UP of the keys hammering 
               out individual letters and numbers: date, hospital, attending 
               physician.

                                     SKIP (V.O.)
                              (playing along)
                         Is that like a mimeograph?... What 
                         about the name?

               EXT. SECOND FLOOR PORCH, THE DUPLEX HOUSE - NIGHT

               Mumford looks at Skip.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What about it?

                                     SKIP
                         "Mumford"... I mean, why pick the 
                         name of the town you were going to?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Oh. You got it backwards. I already 
                         had the name when I started looking 
                         for somewhere to settle. When I saw 
                         this town on a map, I thought maybe 
                         it was a sign. See...

               INT. ANONYMOUS WORK ROOM - DAY

               The typewriter is just pounding out: MICHAEL OLIVER MUM-F-O-
               R-D.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         ...Mickey Mumford was in Miss Rice's 
                         kindergarten class with me. He was 
                         killed with his parents in a wreck 
                         on their way back from a Steelers 
                         game. He was only six years old, 
                         which is a real plus, so there's a 
                         birth certificate if anyone checks -- 
                         but not much else. They died in 
                         Pennsylvania, so there's no death 
                         certificate in West Virginia... that's 
                         also good.

               ON A KITCHEN TABLE, the new birth certificate, now filled 
               out for Michael Mumford, is carefully lifted from a shallow 
               bowl of light tea (the tea bags are nearby). The paper has 
               taken on an aged, sepia look. CUT TO:

               A STACK OF BOOKS. The ones on top are lifted away. The bottom 
               book is opened to reveal the birth certificate. It has been 
               folded in an official way. Now Mumford unfolds it, then 
               refolds it differently -- with its smudges and creases, it's 
               starting to look old.

                                     SKIP (V.O.)
                         And a birth certificate is enough?

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         Everything flows from that, and what 
                         doesn't... can be easily purchased.

               SERIES OF SHOTS of Mumford's DOCUMENTATION PILING UP. A post 
               office box is emptied, official-looking correspondence is 
               opened, the bounty is laid out for perusal: Social Security 
               card, driver's license, college and graduate school diplomas, 
               license and accreditation to operate as a therapist.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         Of course, my IRS training made it 
                         easier. Once you've done that, there's 
                         not much data you can't access and 
                         use any way you want.

               EXT. SECOND FLOOR PORCH, THE DUPLEX HOUSE - NIGHT

                                     MUMFORD
                         In a free society, you are who you 
                         say you are.
                              (smiling)
                         People should remember that before 
                         they go around knocking this country.
                              (he gets up)
                         Skip, all this beer's got me sleepy.

               Skip looks upset.

                                     SKIP
                         But you studied psychology, right? 
                         You did the training and just never 
                         got the degree?

                                     MUMFORD
                         No... no training.

                                     SKIP
                              (hopeful)
                         Psych major?

                                     MUMFORD
                         English Lit.

                                     SKIP
                         Jeez, man. But you're good at it!

                                     MUMFORD
                         I understand what it's like to want 
                         to leave a problem behind. That's 
                         all most people are looking to do.
                              (shrugs)
                         Mainly, I listen.

               He heads inside.

                                     SKIP
                         Where ya going? I've got a million 
                         questions.

                                     MUMFORD
                         See you Thursday... regular time.

               Mumford goes inside. Skip nods, head spinning.

               EXT. NEIGHBORHOOD STREET - SUNRISE

               Mumford and Sofie are delivering newspapers in lovely first 
               light. Mumford has a canvas sack full of newspapers around 
               his neck. At each house, he consults the list in his hand, 
               then hands Sofie a rolled-up paper, which she throws -- with 
               varying success -- toward the front doors. The activity is 
               tiring for her, but she's committed.

                                     SOFIE
                         ...so we get on this incredible steam 
                         engine train that runs up into the 
                         mountains...
                              (she tosses a paper, 
                              grunting)
                         ...and this trip is everything it's 
                         cracked up to be... an open car, 
                         great views, the mountain air blowing 
                         through. We're sitting there, married 
                         for six years, and he says how he 
                         likes it better when I put my hair 
                         back...

               Mumford hands her another paper, which she heaves with all 
               her limited strength, missing the front porch badly. Mumford, 
               who can't get enough of watching her, doesn't notice at first.

                                     SOFIE
                         That wasn't so good.

               Mumford snaps out of it. He goes up on the lawn and flips 
               the paper deftly onto the porch. As they continue --

                                     MUMFORD
                         You're doing great.

                                     SOFIE
                         I don't know if I'm going to make it 
                         the whole way.

                                     MUMFORD
                         It doesn't matter. Go on.

                                     SOFIE
                         Oh... this makes me sound irrational, 
                         which is probably right, but there 
                         was something about him saying this -- 
                         it was maybe the millionth time he'd 
                         told me about some preference of 
                         his. Well, I was so... tired of it.
                              (memories)
                         Seems like my whole life someone's 
                         been telling me... I'm just not 
                         getting it right. Can we rest for a 
                         second?

               She leans against the iron handrail on some front steps, 
               breathing hard.

                                     SOFIE
                         You're purposely making me talk while 
                         we do this...
                              (Mumford nods)
                         ...because you think this is good 
                         for me...
                              (nods again)
                         ...and you're a sadistic bastard...

                                     MUMFORD
                         Yes.

                                     SOFIE
                         ...who thinks there's nothing really 
                         wrong with me.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Oh, there's something wrong with 
                         you, all right. Especially after 
                         hearing that dream of yours, about 
                         the Roto-Rooter.

               She laughs. They're playing with each other.

                                     SOFIE
                         That was really bad, wasn't it?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Disgusting.

                                     SOFIE
                         And I'll bet you can interpret the 
                         whole thing

                                     MUMFORD
                         It's pretty obvious to a trained 
                         professional.

               Sofie starts walking again, taking another newspaper from 
               his sack. He points to the next house.

                                     SOFIE
                         I hate those dreams where everything 
                         means something.

               Sofie heaves the paper squarely onto the porch. She turns to 
               him with pride, but when she sees the way he looks at her, 
               she glances away, uncomfortable.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Is that when you split up?

                                     SOFIE
                         No, that'd be a good story, but that 
                         was just the beginning of the end. 
                         We went on for another year or so.

               Mumford hands her another paper and indicates the next house.

                                     SOFIE
                         So whose route is this?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Brady Peck's. Fourteen years old. 
                         Lives next door.

                                     SOFIE
                         And he's where?

                                     MUMFORD
                         In the capitol for Boy's Nation. 
                         Five days. Why?

                                     SOFIE
                              (heaves another paper)
                         I'm thinking a gal could make a good 
                         living doing this. How hard could it 
                         be squeezing out some fourteen year 
                         old?

                                     MUMFORD
                         You like it?

                                     SOFIE
                         It's all right.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Then you can expect me at 5:30 
                         tomorrow morning.

                                     SOFIE
                         And this is legitimate therapy?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Therapy? Hell no, I just don't want 
                         to do it alone.

               INT. MUMFORD'S OFFICE - DAY

               TIGHT ON RAPID SERIES OF IMAGES on slick, glossy magazine 
               pages: each change of image is punctuated by the AMPLIFIED 
               SNAP of the page being turned, like a gunshot. We're SO CLOSE 
               to the images we can't tell when the magazines change -- 
               from Glamour to Vogue to Us to Mademoiselle to W to Vanity 
               Fair. And it doesn't matter. Whether the images are ads or 
               fashion spreads or celebrity candids, the look is the same -- 
               jaded, hip, disinterested, apathetic, either impossibly buff 
               or anorexic, but always severely beautiful. The PAGE TURNING 
               starts at a fevered pitch and becomes even more intense. 
               Finally --

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         What is it, Nessa?

               The IMAGES CONTINUE.

                                     NESSA (V.O.)
                         Isn't she amazing? That is such a 
                         wicked look.

                                     MUMFORD (V.O.)
                         What do you want me to see?

                                     NESSA (V.O.)
                         Just chill for a second. Look at 
                         this guy, it appears he's actually 
                         dead... but gorgeous.

               Mumford is sitting next to Nessa on the couch. At their feet 
               is a mess of magazines. Nessa discards one and immediately 
               starts flipping through a new one beneath it. She is very 
               agitated. Mumford stands up, walks over and sits in his chair.

                                     NESSA
                         What are you doing? We're not done. 
                         I just need to find the thing...

                                     MUMFORD
                         If you don't want to have a session 
                         today, it's okay.

                                     NESSA
                         I want to have the session. I thought 
                         it would be cool if I could show you 
                         some of the things that interest me. 
                         But I guess you're not into it... 
                         which we already knew.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What happened today?

                                     NESSA
                         What are you talking about?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Was it something that happened at 
                         school?

                                     NESSA
                              (petulant)
                         These appointments were not my idea, 
                         remember.

                                     MUMFORD
                         True. Should we stop them?

               A look of panic crosses Nessa's face, but she instantly hides 
               it, busily taking out cigarette and lighter, which she doesn't 
               use. Instead, she lies down on the couch, balancing the closed 
               magazine on her chest.

                                     NESSA
                         I don't think you know what you're 
                         talking about.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Uh-huh.

                                     NESSA
                         This shrink school you went to... 
                         did you hear about it on an 
                         infomercial?

               Mumford waits. Nessa refers to the magazine beneath her chin.

                                     NESSA
                         I want to live in the world these 
                         people are in. No one ever says 
                         anything in there, have you noticed? 
                         So they're very cool. Like they're 
                         all really deep. It's when people 
                         start talking that everything goes 
                         to shit.

               Nessa suddenly seems on the edge of tears, but beats it back.

                                     NESSA
                         There's this kid at school... Martin 
                         Brockett. He has some gigantic idea 
                         of himself that no one else shares. 
                         You wouldn't believe the crap he 
                         lays on me... Who appointed him my 
                         spiritual leader? If he has everything 
                         so figured out how come his best 
                         friend is a .22 rifle? And why's he 
                         spend all his time chasing after me? 
                         Probably thinks I'm gonna give him a 
                         hummer...

                                     MUMFORD
                         Do you think that's what he wants?

                                     NESSA
                              (after a beat)
                         No. I don't know what he wants. But 
                         I know I don't like being watched. 
                         Nobody's ever paid any attention to 
                         what I did, and I liked it just fine. 
                         Where does he get off telling me I 
                         disrespect myself?
                              (a beat)
                         Fuck him. Look in a mirror, bozo.

               EXT. LILY'S CAF�, MAIN STREET - DAY

               Mumford crosses the street from his office. A huge bus with 
               "APPLEJACK TOURS" on the sides, is disgorging its passengers, 
               a large group of elderly JAPANESE WOMEN, all of whom file 
               neatly into Lily's Caf�. Lily stands on the sidewalk outside 
               greeting them merrily.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What's the deal?

               Lily continues her welcomes, but points out a hand-lettered 
               sign in her front window -- "Closed for Lunch. See you 
               tomorrow."

                                     LILY
                         They come through a few times each 
                         year.
                              (greeting one cheerily)
                         Hello, Mrs. Saito, good to see you 
                         again!
                              (back to Mumford)
                         It's a tour.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Where am I supposed to eat?

                                     LILY
                         You're on your own today, honey.

               Mumford's attention is suddenly drawn to something across 
               the street. He glances thoughtfully at Lily for a moment, 
               then back out there.

               WHAT HE SEES: Skip is once again zipping down the street on 
               his skateboard in the midst of traffic. He has not noticed 
               Mumford.

                                     MUMFORD (O.S.)
                         Hey, Skip!

               Skip looks over, then immediately changes course toward them, 
               barely checking the surrounding traffic. He is extraordinarily 
               skillful. When he gets to the curb, he pulls a snazzy board-
               flipping maneuver to dismount and come up on the sidewalk. 
               Some of the Japanese matrons react with delight.

                                     SKIP
                         Doc.

               Skip notices the tour members filing by, but is immediately 
               distracted by the presence of Lily, who's a little excited 
               to meet the local celebrity.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Lily, I want you to meet Skip. Skip, 
                         Lily.

                                     LILY
                         It's a pleasure to meet you.

                                     SKIP
                              (flustered)
                         Yeah... me you, too... I was at your 
                         house...

                                     LILY
                         Oh?

                                     SKIP
                         Upstairs, with Doc... Yeah, it's 
                         very nice... I heard your shower.

               Skip can't believe what he just said. Neither can the other 
               two, actually. Mumford can't stop himself from laughing, but 
               he cuts it off fast. Lily blushes, but Skip's agitation has 
               charmed her. Something's happening here.

                                     LILY
                         I've seen you going by on your board, 
                         but I didn't realize -- you're so 
                         young... to be so...

                                     SKIP
                         What?

                                     MUMFORD
                         ...so rich?

                                     LILY
                              (gives him a look)
                         ...so accomplished.

                                     SKIP
                         I may be young, but Doc can tell 
                         you, I'm very immature.

               He's making a joke and it represents quite a recovery. They're 
               all relieved. Then there's an awkward silence. Skip watches 
               the last of the tour enter the restaurant.

                                     SKIP
                         So, is this like a Japanese 
                         restaurant?

                                     LILY
                         I'd better get in there.

                                     SKIP
                         That's a lot of people all at once.

                                     LILY
                         It's okay. They pre-order. There's a 
                         choice of three entrees.

                                     SKIP
                         What are they?

               Lily gives him a careful look: Is he really interested? 
               There's something about him...

                                     LILY
                         Meat loaf, turkey quesadillas, or 
                         salad nicoise.

                                     SKIP
                         Salad nicoise? I love salad nicoise.

                                     LILY
                              (giggling)
                         You do?

                                     SKIP
                         Yeah.

                                     LILY
                         Well, come on in.

               She motions him in and starts to follow. Mumford makes a 
               "what about me?" sound. Lily, grinning, just points to the 
               sign and leaves Mumford standing on the sidewalk.

                                     DELBANCO (O.S.)
                         Dr. Mumford.

               Mumford turns to find Dr. Delbanco and Phyllis Sheeler, the 
               shrinks Lionel had conferred with, standing nearby. It takes 
               a moment for Mumford to remember Delbanco. Finally, shaking 
               hands --

                                     MUMFORD
                         Dr. Delbanco. It's nice to see you 
                         again.

                                     DELBANCO
                         I don't think you know Dr. Sheeler. 
                         She's the other therapist here in 
                         town.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (shaking her hand)
                         Of course... I've heard great things 
                         about you.

                                     SHEELER
                         Thank you.

                                     DELBANCO
                         You never got back to me.
                              (Mumford doesn't 
                              understand)
                         ...I called to say we'd like to take 
                         you out for a meal?... Kind of a 
                         professional welcome.

               Mumford makes a show of remembering.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Forgive me, please. What a gracious 
                         thought. We must do that.

                                     SHEELER
                         When?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Why don't I call you when I've got 
                         my calendar in front of me?

                                     DELBANCO
                         What are you doing for lunch?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Right now?

               The other two nod in unison. Mumford considers, trapped.

               INT. THE LANTERN AND THE LAMB RESTAURANT - DAY

               The town's upscale dining spot. Mumford, Delbanco and Sheeler 
               are in a red leather booth. Sheeler listens with rapt, 
               admiring attention as Delbanco speaks --

                                     DELBANCO
                         ...annihilation anxieties engendered 
                         by bad experiences with a depriving 
                         mother... but no one can escape the 
                         fear of death. It is, as Henry James 
                         put it, "the worm at the core." Try 
                         as we may to forget or ignore our 
                         mortality, James said --
                              (theatrically)
                         -- "the skull will grin in at the 
                         banquet."

               Mumford nods appreciatively. (He really is an extraordinary 
               listener.) Delbanco catches his own vanity in Sheeler's 
               adoring gaze and becomes self-conscious --

                                     DELBANCO
                         I've run on. Forgive me. We're here 
                         to talk about you.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Are we?

                                     SHEELER
                              (covering)
                         What Ernest means, I think, is we're 
                         very interested in other 
                         methodology... different kinds of 
                         training. We're great believers in 
                         learning from each other. I've learned 
                         so much from Ern -- Dr. Delbanco...

                                     DELBANCO
                         ...And I from Phyllis.

                                     SHEELER
                              (back to a previous 
                              thread)
                         So... the University of Kentucky. 
                         Who runs the program down there?

                                     MUMFORD
                         My mentor was an amazing teacher 
                         named Benton Mandlebaum. Died quite 
                         tragically in the collapse of a 
                         gazebo.

                                     DELBANCO
                         I think I've heard of him... a 
                         disciple of Rothberg, wasn't he?

               Mumford's response, and all that follow, is calm and pleasant.

                                     MUMFORD
                         It's possible. I don't know about 
                         that.

                                     SHEELER
                         I suppose your extended training was 
                         at an institution in that area?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Lots of institutions. My graduate 
                         advisor believed we should experience 
                         as many environments as possible -- 
                         prisons, clinics, half-way houses. 
                         For a while I was chief therapist in 
                         a shopping mall. Had a little spot 
                         next to the yogurt place.

                                     DELBANCO
                         Interesting approach. What was his 
                         name?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Dorothy Fowler. Fantastic woman. She 
                         passed last year in a train wreck. 
                         Damned Amtrak.

               Delbanco and Sheeler exchange a look. Sheeler adopts a 
               "casual" tone --

                                     SHEELER
                         I trained in the east, myself -- 
                         Cornell -- and I don't care what 
                         anyone says, there really are regional 
                         differences. I found the state 
                         certification exams out here quite 
                         harrowing... Did you?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Oh, yeah, very tough. But I guess 
                         that's good... to keep out the quacks.

                                     SHEELER
                         Which examiner did you have? I 
                         probably know him.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Wallace Franklin... from Greensburg.

               A dark look comes over Sheeler's face for a moment.

                                     SHEELER
                         That was a terrible thing.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (agrees)
                         I don't even know why hang-gliding 
                         is considered a legitimate sport.

                                     DELBANCO
                              (back on track)
                         We're interested in any new therapies. 
                         How would you characterize your 
                         approach?

                                     MUMFORD
                         My approach?

                                     SHEELER
                         Yes... your particular approach.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I don't have one really. Most of the 
                         time I'm faking it. See, I think 
                         there's not much that can be done 
                         about most problems... they're too 
                         complicated, too deep-rooted by the 
                         time I hear about them. The most I 
                         can do, usually, is look and listen 
                         real closely, try to catch some 
                         glimpse of the secret life everybody's 
                         got. If I can get a sense of that, 
                         well then, maybe... just maybe, I 
                         can help them out a little.

               Mumford sits back, considering the couple across the table. 
               His gaze is so crystalline that, after a moment, they become 
               uncomfortable and steal a glance at each other. Finally --

                                     DELBANCO
                         I see.

               INT. MUMFORD'S OFFICE - DAY

               CLOSE ON Althea Brockett.

                                     ALTHEA
                         -- The argument had nothing to do 
                         with it.

                                     MUMFORD (O.S.)
                         I understand. I just want to know 
                         what the argument was about.

                                     ALTHEA
                              (hates to say)
                         I had ordered some books. "The 100 
                         Greatest Books Ever Written."

                                     MUMFORD (O.S.)
                         Uh-huh. What are they?

                                     ALTHEA
                         Oh, all the great writers -- 
                         Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, Moby 
                         Dick... those people. Each is bound 
                         in genuine premium leather with 22 
                         carat gold accents. It's a magnificent 
                         set -- and only $33.50 per volume. 
                         Right away you get Great Expectations 
                         for just $6.99.

                                     MUMFORD (O.S.)
                         One hundred books?

                                     ALTHEA
                         It's irrelevant. It had nothing to 
                         do with what happened.

                                     MUMFORD (O.S.)
                         What happened?

               Althea is sitting on the couch facing Mumford. She has a 
               bulky knit cardigan sweater hugged tightly around her -- the 
               only sign that she's not completely calm.

                                     ALTHEA
                         We argued on Sunday. He went to work 
                         on Monday and stayed in the city 
                         during the week, like always. But on 
                         Thursday, when he normally comes 
                         home, he didn't. Didn't call either. 
                         Not till Saturday afternoon.

                                     MUMFORD
                         You must have been concerned.

                                     ALTHEA
                         It's happened before.
                              (a beat)
                         I'm shocked by how little I'm feeling. 
                         I can't understand it.
                              (a real question --)
                         I'll probably have a complete 
                         depressoid collapse soon, won't I?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Doubtful. What did he say?

                                     ALTHEA
                         He said he wasn't coming back. He 
                         said it wasn't working for him any 
                         more. That it hadn't "worked for 
                         him" for quite a while... You know 
                         what I regret the most? I'm sorry I 
                         let him make the kids take his name. 
                         He was an acquirer.
                              (off Mumford's look)
                         He liked to acquire things.

               Mumford looks away. Althea realizes what he's thinking.

                                     ALTHEA
                         You think that has something to do 
                         with my problem? Ordering all those 
                         things?...

               It hadn't occurred to Mumford, but it's an interesting 
               thought.

                                     ALTHEA
                         ...Like I was on some kind of campaign 
                         to out-acquire him...
                              (excited now, playing 
                              it out)
                         ...If I was just an acquisition to 
                         him, and he lost interest once he 
                         had me --

               She stops, shakes her head.

                                     ALTHEA
                         That can't be it. It's too simple. 
                         And besides, I still like it. This 
                         morning I ordered a marble turtle 
                         cheese board from The Horchow 
                         Collection.
                              (an odd look)
                         Can I tell you something just awful? 
                         You know how people who are just 
                         assholes will sometimes look at a 
                         woman who's got problems and say, 
                         "What she needs is a good shtupping!"?

               Mumford nods.

                                     ALTHEA
                         Well, there may be something to that. 
                         Jeremy didn't keep up his end -- Oh, 
                         what difference does it make?
                              (suddenly)
                         Why do I feel elated? Am I in denial? 
                         You know what it feels like?...

               She glances at her watch, then starts talking fast --

                                     ALTHEA
                         I know my time's up, but I've got to 
                         get this out while I've got hold of 
                         it --

                                     MUMFORD
                         Take your time.

                                     ALTHEA
                              (no slowing down)
                         -- When I was in high school, the 
                         thing I wanted most, when I was stuck 
                         in class, the thing I was always 
                         desperately in pursuit of -- was a 
                         hall pass. That's all I wanted. I 
                         loved moving freely around the school 
                         while everybody else was trapped in 
                         there... And that's how I feel right 
                         now... Like I have some giant, all-
                         day hall pass.

               She is beaming, but suddenly becomes self-conscious. She 
               stands up abruptly, flushed.

                                     ALTHEA
                         My god, did it just get hot in here 
                         or what?

               She takes off the bulky sweater and bends to pick up her 
               purse. She is wearing a simple cotton dress that buttons up 
               the front and hugs her body. WE SEE for the first time what 
               all her other outfits have hidden: Althea has a terrific, 
               voluptuous figure.

                                     ALTHEA
                         See you next time. I'll probably be 
                         a basket case by then.

               She heads toward the door to the waiting room. Mumford 
               indicates the back door.

                                     MUMFORD
                         You can go out there if you like...

                                     ALTHEA
                              (quoting Mumford)
                         "There's no shame in getting a little 
                         therapy", right, Doc?

               She opens the door to the waiting room, startling Henry 
               Follett, who jumps up from a chair out there, magazine still 
               in hand.

               INT. WAITING ROOM, MUMFORD'S OFFICE - DAY

               Follett is embarrassed to be discovered here. But that's 
               secondary to the impact Althea's current appearance -- sexy 
               body framed in the doorway -- is having on him. She's been a 
               customer in his store, but he's seeing her now as if for the 
               first time. All his libidinous buttons are being pushed. 
               Althea breezes by, oblivious to his reaction.

                                     ALTHEA
                         Hello, Mr. Follett. Have a good 
                         session. Bye, Doc.

               She goes out.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Henry...

               But Follett continues to stare in the direction Althea has 
               gone.

               INT. LOBBY ATRIUM, PANDA MODEM WORLD HEADQUARTERS - DAY

               Mumford is being escorted across the spectacular atrium by a 
               PANDA SECURITY AIDE. Her informal uniform, and all the other 
               details in the building, carry out the Panda design motif. 
               As they head down the main corridor --

                                     SKIP (O.S.)
                         Hey, Doc!

               Mumford looks that way. In the distance, Skip is descending 
               from an upper level on his skateboard via a unique system of 
               ramps designed for that purpose alone. None of the hustling 
               Panda Employees in the area take any particular notice of 
               the sight.

               Skip meets Mumford and his escort at the bottom of the ramp 
               with a spectacular stop.

                                     SKIP
                         Thanks, Jennifer, I'll take him from 
                         here.

               The Security Aide retreats as Skip (riding slowly alongside) 
               leads Mumford into a side corridor.

               INT. BOWELS OF THE BUILDING, PANDA MODEM HEADQUARTERS - DAY

               SERIES OF SHOTS. Skip and Mumford move through a maze of 
               hallways with progressively less foot traffic.

                                     SKIP
                         I've never brought anyone down here 
                         before.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I'm honored.

                                     SKIP
                         Doc, there's something about what 
                         you told me the other night I can't 
                         get out of my head. It's driving me 
                         batty --
                              (Mumford nods, waits)
                         Why me? How did you know you could 
                         trust me?

                                     MUMFORD
                         You're completely reliable.

               Skip is pleased. They approach a heavy steel door, the 
               entrance to Skip's Workshop. A VERY OLD SECURITY AIDE sits 
               at the end of the intersecting hallway, watching this area. 
               Skip shouts down there --

                                     SKIP
                         It's just me, Dino!

               The old man nods, barely awake.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Skip, I've got a problem and I need 
                         some advice.

                                     SKIP
                         You want my advice? Far out!

               Skip puts his hand in a scanning device in the wall. Some 
               lights blink and the heavy metal door pops open a few inches. 
               Skip has to put all his weight into opening the door. He 
               hesitates, suddenly concerned --

                                     SKIP
                         I hope nothing you're about to see 
                         will shake your faith in me.

               Mumford reassures him with a look. Skip pushes the door open 
               far enough for them to enter, then pulls it closed behind 
               them.

               INT. SKIP'S WORKSHOP - DAY

               Mumford and Skip enter the large, windowless workspace. What 
               at first appears chaotic is, in fact, carefully organized. 
               Many different disciplines interface here:

               THE BODY SECTION: The first thing one notices -- some 
               incredibly life-like, anatomically correct, 
               sculpture/mannequins -- both male and female. You half expect 
               them to breathe. From there, a full wall of forms descends 
               from store mannequins and skeletons all the way down to a 
               huge variety of inflatable sex dolls.

               THE CYBER SECTION: A dizzying array of computers and screens, 
               some showing wire-form outlines of body parts in repeated 
               motion. Above them, on a huge corkboard, hundreds of computer 
               generated renderings of skin, eyes, limbs, sexual organs.

               THE BODY PARTS SECTION: Medical models of teeth, eyes, lips, 
               limbs. Hundreds of porn store samples: plastic dildos, rubber 
               vaginas, sucking machines and sundry genitalia.

               THE FORM-CASTING SHOP: All the machinery you need to make 
               rubber and acrylic forms of anything that can be computer 
               designed.

               All these weird objects are set upon shiny, spotless, high-
               tech work surfaces. Skip watches Mumford move about in awe, 
               picking up the odd item.

                                     SKIP
                         Pretty creepy, huh? Are you totally 
                         disgusted?

                                     MUMFORD
                              ("no")
                         Skip, you're a visionary. That can 
                         be a burden.

                                     SKIP
                         This doesn't seem a little... 
                         perverse?

                                     MUMFORD
                         There are a lot of lonely people in 
                         the world. Somebody's gonna figure 
                         this out someday.

                                     SKIP
                         It's not going to be me. I'm giving 
                         it up.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Really?

                                     SKIP
                         It's all your fault. In the last 48 
                         hours, I've completely lost interest.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What'd I do?

               Skip looks at Mumford, a wide grin on his face.

                                     SKIP
                         Lily.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Lily...
                              (gets it)
                         ...Skip, that's great! You and Lily.

                                     SKIP
                         Oh, she doesn't know about it yet. 
                         Right now, of the two of us, I'm the 
                         only one in love. But I'm very stoked.

               Skip settles in front of the Body Parts section, framed by 
               an array of limbs and sex toys. There's an assembled pelvic 
               section with upper legs lying in the clutter behind him.

                                     SKIP
                         Doc, how I can be of help to you?

               Skip leans back against the table and accidentally hits a 
               button. The pelvic section begins to hump, slowly and 
               sensually, in place. It's amazingly life-like, but it makes 
               a mechanical WHIRRING SOUND. Skip fumbles to turn it off.

                                     SKIP
                         Sorry...

                                     MUMFORD
                         Wow.

               Skip gets the pelvis switched off and turns back to Mumford.

                                     SKIP
                         I'm here for you, Doc.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Skip, you know that it's improper -- 
                         completely unethical -- for a licensed 
                         psychologist to carry on a romantic 
                         relationship with one of his patients?

                                     SKIP
                         I guess that makes sense.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Yes, yes it does...

               Mumford sinks into silence. He begins to wander the room.

                                     SKIP
                         You've fallen in love with one of 
                         your patients?

               Mumford nods. Skip is desperate to say something useful. 
               Suddenly, he has an alarming thought.

                                     SKIP
                         Doc!... It's not me, is it?

                                     MUMFORD
                         What?

               Mumford understands and can't stop a laugh.

                                     MUMFORD
                         No, Skip, it's not you. But I like 
                         you a lot.

               Skip is relieved. He has another thought and brightens.

                                     SKIP
                         Doc, what about this? You're not 
                         really a licensed psychologist!

               Mumford turns to meet Skip's gaze. Skip realizes the 
               ramifications of what he's just said.

                                     SKIP
                         Hmm. I guess that doesn't help... I 
                         see where you're going here. It's a 
                         mess.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Yep.

               INT. DR. DELBANCO'S OFFICE - DAY

               Lionel is here with Delbanco and Sheeler. This time, Delbanco 
               is behind his desk, Sheeler across the room on the sofa.

                                     LIONEL
                         Don't you find it incredibly 
                         convenient that everyone who could 
                         possibly corroborate his story has 
                         recently died some exotic death?

                                     DELBANCO
                         They're neither all recent nor exotic.

                                     SHEELER
                         But they're certainly dead. And yes, 
                         personally, I find it a bit odd.

                                     DELBANCO
                         It could happen. What about his state 
                         certification exams? The records 
                         seem to be in order.

               Lionel's derisive snort is so obnoxious, it's hard to bear.

                                     LIONEL
                         What's easier than hacking your way 
                         into a state computer and inserting 
                         some numbers? For all you know he 
                         never even took the exams!

                                     SHEELER
                         That's true.

                                     DELBANCO
                         I don't know that it's all that 
                         easy...

                                     LIONEL
                         Doctor, correct me if I'm wrong, but 
                         it sounds to me like you've gone for 
                         this guy's story hook, line and bull-
                         twaddle.

                                     SHEELER
                         You do seem much more disposed toward 
                         him than I understand, Ernest. Did I 
                         miss something?

                                     DELBANCO
                              (sharply)
                         Oh, for god's sake, Phyllis -- we 
                         have no reason to doubt the man! Are 
                         we listening to Lionel now?

               Sheeler jumps, so shocked is she by his outburst, and so 
               humiliated for Lionel to witness it. Fighting tears and trying 
               to maintain her dignity, she gathers up her things and walks 
               to the door. Delbanco, immediately contrite, stands up.

                                     DELBANCO
                         Phyllis, I'm sorry. I didn't mean to 
                         shout...

                                     SHEELER
                         No, Dr. Delbanco, it is I who am 
                         sorry. Sorry to have wasted your 
                         time with such...

               She breaks into tears and rushes out of the office. Delbanco 
               is left facing Lionel, who gives him exactly the look the 
               doctor least wants to see.

               INT. LILY'S CAF� - DAY

               Mumford is eating his lunch at the counter. He watches Lily 
               busily working the midday rush. She sees him grinning at 
               her, but doesn't say anything for a while. Finally, blushing --

                                     LILY
                         Stop it! He's a kid. I'm old enough 
                         to be his... older sister.

               Mumford smiles, eats.

               INT. ENTRY HALL, COOK HOUSE - NIGHT

               Mr. Cook opens the front door to Mumford.

                                     COOK
                         Dr. Mumford. Please, come in.

               Mumford comes in, reluctantly.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Hello, Mr. Cook. I was wondering if 
                         Sofie was around?

                                     COOK
                         Were you supposed to have a session?

                                     MUMFORD
                         No. It's sort of spur of the moment.

               INT. LIVING ROOM, COOK HOUSE - NIGHT

               Mumford follows Mr. Cook into the room. Mrs. Cook and Sofie's 
               thirtyish brother, BEN, are in there, watching television. 
               Mrs. Cook keeps knitting; Ben stands to shake Mumford's hand, 
               muting the TV with a remote.

                                     COOK
                         Look who's here. Have you met Sofie's 
                         moth--

                                     MRS. COOK
                         -- We've met.

                                     COOK
                         And our son, Ben...

                                     BEN
                              (vigorously shakes 
                              hands)
                         This is a real honor, Doctor. Have a 
                         seat, will ya?

               Mumford continues to stand.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Well, actually, I can't really... Do 
                         you think I could see Sofie?

                                     BEN
                         I insist! I've been wanting to meet 
                         you.

               Mumford sits.

                                     MRS. COOK
                              (icy)
                         Sofie's not here.

               Mumford's surprised. Mr. Cook speaks with some pleasure.

                                     COOK
                         Her friend from the city came and 
                         took her out to dinner. First time 
                         in a long time she's been willing.

                                     MUMFORD
                         A friend?

                                     BEN
                         We owe that to you. She's perked up 
                         a lot since you started treating 
                         her.

               Mrs. Cook gives Ben a condescending look and keeps knitting.

                                     MRS. COOK
                         What'd you want?

                                     MUMFORD
                         There's something I think we need to 
                         talk about.

                                     MRS. COOK
                         What?

                                     MR. COOK
                         Elizabeth...

                                     MRS. COOK
                         I think we have a right.

                                     BEN
                         We certainly do not.

                                     MRS. COOK
                         Keep it zipped, Ben.

               Ben gives Mumford an exasperated look, but doesn't argue.

                                     MR. COOK
                         Is there something we need to know, 
                         Dr. Mumford?

               Mumford is conflicted, not sure what to share with them.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Well... yes, I guess I should tell 
                         you. I don't think I'm going to be 
                         able to treat Sofie anymore.

               Mr. Cook and Ben exchange an alarmed glance. Mrs. Cook 
               actually cheers up.

                                     MRS. COOK
                         Finally, some common sense...

                                     MUMFORD
                         What do you mean?

                                     MRS. COOK
                         I think you know what I mean.

                                     MUMFORD
                         No, I really don't.

                                     MRS. COOK
                         I think you do.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Why don't you tell me?

                                     MRS. COOK
                              (very calm)
                         Why don't you go to hell? It's all a 
                         bunch of nonsense and you know it.

                                     MR. COOK
                         Elizabeth, I'm tellin' you, stop 
                         this...

                                     MRS. COOK
                              (dismissive)
                         You're telling me? That's rich...

                                     MUMFORD
                              (standing up)
                         I'd better go.

                                     BEN
                         Why can't you see Sofie? I know the 
                         treatment's working.

               Mumford looks from Ben to Mr. Cook, who nods his agreement.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Well... you see, the problem is --

                                     MRS. COOK
                         -- the problem is you're a big fake. 
                         You haven't got a clue what's wrong 
                         with that girl.

               Mumford looks at Mrs. Cook and can't stifle a laugh.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Wow. You're something.

                                     MRS. COOK
                         Take a hike, Dr. Quack!

                                     MR. COOK
                              (ignoring her now)
                         What is the problem, Doctor?

               Mumford can't take his eyes off Mrs. Cook, even as he speaks 
               to Mr. Cook.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Problem? I guess there is no 
                         problem... Uh, this friend of Sofie's, 
                         where'd he take her?

                                     BEN
                         It's she -- Roxy. Used to work with 
                         her. I think they went over to The 
                         Lantern.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (delighted)
                         Oh, Roxy! Excellent. Roxy.

               Mrs. Cook looks at him sharply. She's heard what the other 
               two have not.

               EXT. SIDE STREET/ALLEY - DAY

               Mumford carries a large Fed-Ex box down a side street and 
               into an alley. As he passes a secluded space created by two 
               adjacent buildings, something catches his eye.

               MUMFORD'S MOVING POV: A young couple is embracing and talking 
               intimately. As they separate, we can see that it is Nessa 
               and Martin Brockett. Martin sees Mumford, but makes no sign. 
               Nessa twists to see what Martin's looking at just as the 
               view is interrupted by a wall.

               Mumford walks on, mulling what he's seen.

               EXT. BACK DOOR, FOLLETT'S PHARMACY - DAY

               There is a locked security screen at the alley entrance to 
               the back room of the pharmacy, but the door inside is open. 
               When a YOUNG PHARMACIST appears in there, Mumford raps on 
               the metal screen.

               INT. HENRY FOLLETT'S OFFICE - DAY

               Follett's private space is above and at the back of his 
               drugstore. When you sit at his desk and in front of it, as 
               Follett and Mumford are doing now, you can see down into the 
               store through a floor-to-ceiling, one-way mirror.

               The Fed-Ex box sits on the desk between the two men, unopened.

                                     FOLLETT
                         What is it?

                                     MUMFORD
                         It's a thought I had.

                                     FOLLETT
                         Should I open it now?

               Mumford seems hesitant, but nods. Follett takes out an Exacto 
               knife and makes the first incision, but as he's about to go 
               on, Mumford suddenly reaches out and stops him.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Let me just say something here... I 
                         have no idea if this is going to 
                         help.

                                     FOLLETT
                         What exactly is it supposed to do?

                                     MUMFORD
                         You remember when I asked you about 
                         pornography --

                                     FOLLETT
                         -- I find it degrading. Maximum 
                         gynecology and minimum turn-on --

                                     MUMFORD
                         -- and you told me that. Still, 
                         there's some kind of imagery that's 
                         haunting you and, I think, getting 
                         in your way --

                                     FOLLETT
                         -- Which I don't necessarily agree.

                                     MUMFORD
                         But you did come to me.

               Follett reacts. It's true, even if he keeps forgetting.

                                     MUMFORD
                         My guess is these images were burned 
                         into your brain when you were young. 
                         Maybe if we could nail down the exact 
                         fantasies that are haunting you -- 
                         maybe you could get past them... 
                         Anyway, I thought we could try an 
                         experiment.

                                     FOLLETT
                              (indicating the box)
                         And the experiment is in here?

               Mumford nods, but suddenly looks depressed, distracted.

                                     MUMFORD
                         You know what? I think this was a 
                         dumb idea...

               He starts to take hold of the box.

                                     MUMFORD
                         ...I just heard myself talking and I 
                         realize I'm completely unqualified 
                         to be doing this. Let's forget the 
                         whole thing.

               Follett grabs the box back.

                                     FOLLETT
                         Whoa, whoa, what are you doing? I 
                         want to know what's in here.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (pulling on the box)
                         There's absolutely no reason to think 
                         this is going to have any impact on 
                         you. I'm embarrassed to have --

               Follett stands up and grabs the box, taking sole possession. 
               Loud --

                                     FOLLETT
                         Hey! I agree with you that you don't 
                         know what you're talking about. That's 
                         what I've been saying all along. And 
                         I can guarantee you that looking at 
                         the Lost Ark or whatever you got in 
                         here is not going to mean diddly to 
                         me...
                              (quieting down)
                         ...but if you think I'm going to let 
                         you walk out of here without seeing 
                         what's in this box, you don't know 
                         much about Henry A. Follett.

               Mumford gives up. Follett gestures to ask whether it's safe 
               to put the box on the desk; Mumford reassures him. Now, with 
               much more anticipation and ceremony than before, Follett 
               carefully cuts open the package.

               THE CONTENTS OF THE BOX is revealed as Follett opens the 
               flaps. There is an inner, brown paper wrapping upon which 
               has been set a low-rent catalogue: "METROPOLITAN COLLECTIBLES -- 
               Periodicals, Erotica, Adult Nostalgia." Follett lifts away 
               the wrapping --

               There are perhaps a dozen men's magazines of the late fifties 
               and early sixties: Nugget, Adam, The Adam Reader, Swank, 
               Dude. Plus several cartoon collections: Sex to Sexty, Stag 
               Humor. Plus trashy adult novels of the era, with provocative 
               illustrations on the covers: Night Call Nurse, The Neighbors 
               Have No Curtains, Secretarial Sluts, etc. Finally, two video 
               tapes, both of Russ Meyer films: MUDHONEY and COMMON-LAW 
               CABIN.

               We stay CLOSE ON the contents of the box as Follett's hands 
               shuffle through it, rapidly flipping through the pages. Very 
               soft-core by today's standards, the common thread is clear: 
               voluptuous, heavy-breathing sirens in tight clothes (and out 
               of them) tempting muscular, he-man drifters or libidinous 
               businessmen. A world of lusty secretaries, siren babysitters, 
               and frustrated, neglected wives. In other words, exactly the 
               erotic ambience of Follett's fantasies.

               SLOW TILT UP TO FOLLETT'S FACE. He is transported, mesmerized, 
               galvanized. In fact, at this moment, as the MUSIC SWELLS, a 
               tear is rolling down his cheek. He dare not take his eyes 
               from this Holy Grail to look up at Mumford. The only thing 
               that could wreck his mood now, is --

                                     YOUNG PHARMACIST (O.S.)
                         Mr. Follett --

               Follett jumps, startled from his revery. As the Young 
               Pharmacist steps tentatively into the office, Follett jams 
               everything back into the box as best he can and tries to 
               cover it.

                                     FOLLETT
                         What?! What the hell is so important 
                         I can't have five minutes --?

               The Young Pharmacist is cowed and doesn't advance into the 
               room.

                                     YOUNG PHARMACIST
                         It's her, sir. You told me to get 
                         you when she came to pick up her 
                         prescription.

               It takes Follett a moment to understand, but when he does, 
               his whole manner changes. He dismisses the Young Pharmacist 
               with a nod, then gives a quick, self-conscious glance to 
               Mumford.

                                     FOLLETT
                         Uh, sorry, I'm going to have to...
                              (indicates box)
                         ...I really appreciate what you're 
                         trying to... uh, I can't thank you 
                         enough for...

                                     MUMFORD
                         My pleasure.

               Follett heads for the door, pausing briefly at a mirror to 
               check his appearance, pushing at his hair with his palm.

                                     FOLLETT
                         I'll see you on... whatever...

               He hurries out. Mumford stands up to leave, but first looks 
               down through the one-way mirror.

               WHAT HE SEES: Follett hurries up behind the prescription 
               counter, where Althea Brockett is waiting; once again she 
               looks quite sexy. Follett brings her prescription up and 
               begins playfully flirting. Althea is responsive. Follett 
               motions Althea down the aisle, where it's more private. He 
               comes out from behind the counter, ostensibly to show Althea 
               something on the prescription bottle. Althea leans back 
               against some shelves in the same posture as the Landlady in 
               Follett's first fantasy.

               Mumford reacts, bemused.

               EXT. HIKING TRAIL - DAY

               Mumford and Sofie make their way slowly up the trail. Despite 
               her labored breathing, it's clear Sofie has made enormous 
               progress since we first saw her.

                                     SOFIE
                         When I was in high school we used to 
                         come up here and make out. I liked 
                         to sit on the rock and watch the sun 
                         go down.

                                     MUMFORD
                         That's what I like.

                                     SOFIE
                         Which thing?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Either one.

                                     SOFIE
                         Why'd you come to the house the other 
                         night?

                                     MUMFORD
                         I thought I had something to tell 
                         you. But it turned out I didn't.

                                     SOFIE
                         My brother said you were about to 
                         fire me.

                                     MUMFORD
                         That's one way to put it.

                                     SOFIE
                         I bet I know what changed your mind...
                              (Mumford looks at her)
                         ...My mother. She was so horrible, 
                         you decided you couldn't desert me.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I thought only action movies had 
                         villains like that.

               Sofie gestures ahead.

                                     SOFIE
                         That's the cut-off, isn't it?
                              (Mumford nods)
                         I know why you were going to quit 
                         seeing me.

               Mumford slows at this. Sofie heads off the trail into the 
               woods.

               EXT. BIG ROCK LOOKOUT POINT - DAY

               Sofie appears first, but she waits for Mumford before she 
               steps tentatively onto the rock. Mumford takes firm hold of 
               her and leads her to a spot where she can securely settle 
               herself.

                                     SOFIE
                         You feel like a fake, an imposter...

               Mumford looks up, sharply.

                                     SOFIE
                         ...as if maybe you don't know what 
                         you're doing.

               She puts a hand on his arm.

                                     SOFIE
                         Everybody feels that way sometimes... 
                         like we're not who we're supposed to 
                         be. But I have to tell you, Dr. 
                         Mumford --

               He winces at her formality.

                                     SOFIE
                         -- you've been a tremendous help to 
                         me.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Yeah?

                                     SOFIE
                         I can't tell you how much I admire 
                         you. You have a wonderful way with 
                         people. And you're very insightful. 
                         I feel like you've seen me clearly... 
                         I never used to admit what a horrible 
                         person my mother was. You've made 
                         that possible for me.

                                     MUMFORD
                         That's... good?

                                     SOFIE
                         Yes! And my ex-husband -- he never 
                         accepted me for who I was, just like 
                         Mother. The things you've said have 
                         helped me understand what a dick he 
                         is.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I don't know if --

                                     SOFIE
                         You're shockingly honest, that's 
                         what makes you great. I've never had 
                         a man treat me this way. With you, I 
                         feel really... listened to.
                              (gives him a look)
                         Can I tell you something? It's a 
                         little embarrassing, but I feel very 
                         unguarded with you.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Of course.

                                     SOFIE
                         Thanks to this therapy, I now know 
                         what I'm looking for. I need to find 
                         a man like you.
                              (laughs)
                         Not one who's treating me, of course.
                              (full of resolve)
                         And I'm going to do it, dammit! You've 
                         given me the confidence.

               Mumford is in agony.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Sofie... that makes me very happy.

               INT. MUMFORD'S OFFICE - DAY

               Nessa's on the couch, playing with her usual unlit cigarette. 
               There's an uncharacteristic lightness to her.

                                     NESSA
                         ...I mean, Doc, the dude is seriously 
                         deluded. I said that to him, I said, 
                         "If you think I'm gonna do all that 
                         shit for you, man, you are seriously 
                         deluded."

                                     MUMFORD
                         What'd he say?

                                     NESSA
                              (can't hide her 
                              pleasure)
                         He said -- "Which we already knew!"

               Mumford laughs, delighted.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What did he want you to do?

                                     NESSA
                         First off, he tells me to stop smoking 
                         cigarettes. I told him abso-fuckin'-
                         lutely no. As you can see --

               She holds up the cigarette as though it were her middle 
               finger, flipping the bird.

                                     NESSA
                         Then he says stop smoking dope. No 
                         again. So then he says he doesn't 
                         want me getting together with any 
                         other guys...

               Mumford doesn't have to see her face to know how much pleasure 
               this gives her, despite her hard-ass cover.

                                     NESSA
                         ...What balls on this guy? What're 
                         we...
                              (too geeky for her)
                         ...going steady? Jesus.

                                     MUMFORD
                         No again?

                                     NESSA
                              (long pause)
                         I said I'd consider it. Nobody owns 
                         me. And the last thing was insane. I 
                         don't know what's wrong with him... 
                         No magazines.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Really?

                                     NESSA
                         I don't know if I can quit. We're 
                         gonna try it together, like, you 
                         know, AA or something. And I made 
                         him give up his .22. No more sneaking 
                         around the hills with his fucking 
                         nut gun like some loony tune.

                                     MUMFORD
                         He agreed?

                                     NESSA
                              (yes)
                         He's pitiful, Doc, a goddam puppy. I 
                         don't know how much longer I can put 
                         up with it. I already got two arms 
                         and legs, I don't need another 
                         appendage.

               She takes a look at her watch and immediately lights her 
               cigarette as she stands up --

                                     NESSA
                         Oops... gotta go!

               She heads toward the waiting room. Mumford gestures to 
               indicate the back door. She waves him off. He shakes his 
               head -- no one wants to use the back anymore.

               Nessa opens the door to the waiting room. Martin Brockett is 
               sitting there. He makes a gesture to Nessa to underline the 
               fact that he is not reading any of the many magazines lying 
               around, then stands up. She goes into his arms like maybe 
               she's the puppy. He beams and looks at Mumford.

                                     MARTIN
                         Hiya, Doc.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Martin.

                                     MARTIN
                              (pulling Nessa tighter)
                         Did you straighten her out?

               Nessa give him an affectionate punch in the side, then blows 
               smoke in his face.

                                     MUMFORD
                         How are you?

                                     MARTIN
                         Insane! Didn't ja hear? My family 
                         got five hundred times better.
                              (turning Nessa)
                         Let's go, Vanessa.

               Nessa gives Mumford an embarrassed, "ain't he corny?" look, 
               but as they go out the door, she's never looked happier.

                                     GILROY (O.S.)
                         Doctor Mumford?

               Mumford is startled to find a man in a suit, GILROY, rising 
               from the chair behind the door. He's got a briefcase and a 
               document in his hand.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I didn't see you there. Can I help 
                         you?

                                     GILROY
                         My name's Gilroy. I'm from the State 
                         Certification Board.

               He proffers the document in his hand, but Mumford doesn't 
               take it.

                                     GILROY
                         It's all right, it won't bite you. 
                         Under civil code 1294.67b you are 
                         entitled to be notified that your 
                         status and certification are being 
                         reviewed. This is the notice.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (takes the paper)
                         Do you want to come in?

                                     GILROY
                              (already leaving)
                         No thanks. Plenty of time for that 
                         when we're a little further along.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Mr. Gilroy --

               Gilroy stops, outside door already open.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What brought this on?

                                     GILROY
                         I'm not at liberty to say. Sometimes 
                         it's just routine, sometimes there's 
                         been a complaint. We'll be in touch.

               He goes out. Mumford considers the paper in his hands, 
               thoughts elsewhere.

               INT. MUMFORD'S APARTMENT - NIGHT

               CLOSE ON A PACKING CARTON half full of books. PULLING BACK 
               and FLOATING OVER other boxes, half-packed with Mumford's 
               personal belongings -- he doesn't have a lot. On the bed, an 
               open suitcase with a few clothes thrown in. We're STILL MOVING 
               across the room and out onto the porch, to REVEAL Mumford in 
               his chair, nursing a beer, looking up at the starry sky.

               Mumford HEARS THE SHOWER GO ON downstairs at Lily's. Then 
               the MURMUR AND GIGGLE of a wet couple.

                                     SKIP (O.S.)
                         Far out!

               Mumford smiles. He gets up and goes inside, closing the door 
               behind him so as not to violate their privacy. He goes to 
               the suitcase, takes out some clothes and begins putting them 
               back in the dresser. Right now, he's not going anywhere.

               INT. MUMFORD'S OFFICE - DAY

               EXTREME CLOSE-UP of Ernest Delbanco. We can't tell where he 
               is at first. As he speaks, we PULL BACK to REVEAL him lying 
               on Mumford's couch -- a patient.

                                     DELBANCO
                         ...and when you said at lunch about 
                         everybody having "a secret life", 
                         something just snapped inside me. I 
                         knew I could no longer continue my 
                         relationship with Dr. Sheeler. It 
                         was tearing me up inside. And I know 
                         Phyllis wasn't getting what she needed 
                         from it. What had started as a genuine 
                         respect, I think, for each other's 
                         professional abilities, and became, 
                         over time, a personal attraction had 
                         somehow... migrated into a rather 
                         torrid sexual relationship...

               Across the room, Mumford sits, chin in hand, displaying no 
               reaction.

                                     DELBANCO
                         ...I won't go into that today. Though, 
                         if we should continue these sessions, 
                         as I certainly hope we will, there 
                         are some aspects of that I would 
                         like to look at. God knows, I've 
                         listened to enough people giving me 
                         the juicy --
                              (catches himself)
                         ...At any rate, I just wanted to 
                         acknowledge the catalyzing effect 
                         your comment had on me. I just hope 
                         that it doesn't come roiling back 
                         upon you like some dreadful undertow.

                                     MUMFORD
                         How do you mean?

               This next is painful for Delbanco.

                                     DELBANCO
                         Well... you see, when I broke it off 
                         with Phyllis, she was naturally upset 
                         and she became more determined than 
                         ever to pursue certain -- how to put 
                         it -- doubts she's been harboring...

                                     MUMFORD
                         What kind of doubts?

                                     DELBANCO
                         About you... your background and 
                         your qualifications. I'm afraid 
                         Phyllis somehow got you mixed up in 
                         her fury with me, and actually took 
                         the whole issue to the state board.

               Mumford digests this.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I see.

                                     DELBANCO
                         And please, for whatever small way I 
                         may have encouraged this, accept my 
                         apologies.
                              (brightens)
                         There is good news, though.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What's that?

                                     DELBANCO
                         Phyllis has decided to leave town 
                         and pursue her practice in the city. 
                         Which leaves you the only psychologist 
                         in town.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Dr. Sheeler is leaving Mumford? I'm 
                         sorry to hear that.

                                     DELBANCO
                         As you can imagine, my own feelings 
                         about this are mixed... Unlike, I 
                         must say, those of my wife.

               Mumford's head snaps up. He had no idea Delbanco was married.

               EXT. GAS STATION, SMALL TOWN (IN HENRY FOLLETT'S FANTASY) - 
               DAY

               We (CAMERA) are being pummelled by three SMALL TOWN TOUGHS 
               behind Old Man Sutter's gas station/diner in the Follett's 
               fantasy town. [In BLACK & WHITE.] Beyond them, Old Man 
               Sutter's stacked YOUNG WIFE watches in horror from the 
               backdoor of the building. We DO NOT SEE The Newcomer yet.

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         Old Man Sutter's young bride had got 
                         me in hot water all right, and now I 
                         was bein' dealt the beating of my 
                         life. If there'd just been two of 
                         those bastards it would have been a 
                         little closer...

               One of the Toughs winds up and delivers the coup de grace. 
               CUT TO BLACK, then FADE UP ON:

               INT. ATTIC ROOM, BOARDING HOUSE - DAY

               STILL IN SUBJECTIVE CAMERA as the concerned Landlady, cleavage 
               foremost, stands away from us, having patted the unseen 
               Newcomer's face with a washcloth. Beyond her, near the half-
               open door, stands her Cheerleader Daughter, worriedly chewing 
               on her thumb.

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         The Landlady was good at quite a few 
                         things, but doctoring wasn't one of 
                         them...

               CUT TO REVERSE and see the hero, who this time is actually 
               played by Henry Follett, appearing in his own fantasy for 
               the first time. He's lying in bed, his face bruised in the 
               manner of a fifties movie.

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         ...Lucky for me, one of the other 
                         boarders, the broad who lived 
                         downstairs in the front room...

               BACK AT THE DOOR, the Cheerleader hears someone coming and 
               steps aside to make way for -- Althea Brockett, dressed now 
               in a nurse's uniform so tight the buttons are straining.

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         ...was a nurse...

               As the Landlady and the Cheerleader retreat out the door, 
               Althea the Nurse sways forward toward the bed bearing bandages 
               and a bowl of steaming water, a lascivious look of concern 
               on her face.

                                     FOLLETT (V.O.)
                         ...and she had ways to make you feel 
                         better they didn't teach in nursing 
                         school.

               Althea the Nurse places a bandage over Follett's eyes, 
               BLACKING OUT THE SCENE.

               INT. MUMFORD'S OFFICE - (PRESENT) DAY

               Mumford sits beaming at Henry Follett on the couch. Mumford's 
               glance takes in the clock and he stands up, signalling the 
               end of the session. Follett snaps out of his revery and gets 
               up.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I'm very happy for you, Henry.

               Mumford, surprisingly, takes Follett's hand and shakes it 
               vigorously.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I feel like we're making real progress 
                         here.

                                     FOLLETT
                         Me too, Doc. And I can't tell you 
                         what that package meant to me --

               Mumford stops him with a "don't mention it" gesture. Follett 
               accepts and goes out the back door. Mumford is pleased someone 
               still wants to use that door.

               Mumford returns to his desk and begins reading some papers 
               when he HEARS the entry door to the waiting room. Not 
               expecting anyone, he checks the clock, then goes to his office 
               door and opens it.

               Sofie is standing there, very agitated, just about to knock. 
               She peers past him to see if he's alone.

                                     SOFIE
                         I need to talk to you... Doctor. Can 
                         I come in?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Of course.

               Sofie sits on the couch. Mumford sits in his chair, facing 
               her. Her voice is as strained as her manner.

                                     SOFIE
                         We haven't met in this office since 
                         that first time. This is how a real 
                         professional and his client are 
                         supposed to see each other.

               Mumford waits.

                                     SOFIE
                         It might've been more appropriate if 
                         we had followed a traditional approach 
                         to the doctor-patient relationship.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Is something wrong, Sofie?

                                     SOFIE
                         Yes, something's very wrong, Dr. 
                         Mumford.

                                     MUMFORD
                         You're upset.

                                     SOFIE
                         How intuitive! That must take years 
                         of training right there. Maybe you 
                         can guess what has upset me.

               Mumford considers a long moment, several scenarios racing 
               through his mind. Finally, carefully --

                                     MUMFORD
                         Is it something you've heard about 
                         me?

                                     SOFIE
                         No, it is not something I've heard 
                         about you! It is someth--
                              (stops suddenly)
                         Why? Is there something I should 
                         have heard about you?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Why don't you tell me what's on your 
                         mind?

               Sofie suddenly finds it difficult to look into his eyes, she 
               looks around frenetically for a moment. Then, indicating the 
               couch --

                                     SOFIE
                         May I?

               Mumford gestures "of course." Sofie swings her legs up and 
               lies on the couch so they can no longer see each other's 
               face. (It's the most vigorous movement she's yet shown us.) 
               This seems to help Sofie a bit.

                                     SOFIE
                         All right... I'm going to come right 
                         out and say this, because that's 
                         what your shrink is for, right, so 
                         you can tell him what's bothering 
                         you?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Um-huh.

                                     SOFIE
                              (tone still rough)
                         First of all, I have been feeling 
                         much better lately. I don't know if 
                         the syndrome is over -- if it's just 
                         run its course or something -- but I 
                         feel a hundred per cent better than 
                         when I first came to you.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I'm glad.

                                     SOFIE
                         Given that, I'm obviously not going 
                         to be judging things in the most 
                         realistic way.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I don't follow you.

                                     SOFIE
                              (sharply)
                         I'm saying that since I'm doing so 
                         much better -- which I attribute to 
                         you -- I'm liable to misinterpret 
                         some of my feelings.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (tentative)
                         Okay...

                                     SOFIE
                         The point is this -- I am not a blank 
                         page. I did not just fall off the 
                         turnip truck. Do you know what I 
                         mean?

                                     MUMFORD
                         I think so.

                                     SOFIE
                         I know a little about psychology. I 
                         took three different courses in 
                         college. It's true, none of them 
                         were above the two hundred level, 
                         but I took them... And there was one 
                         concept I remember very well.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What was that?

                                     SOFIE
                         Transference!

                                     MUMFORD
                         Transference.

                                     SOFIE
                         Yes, and that is what I have got 
                         right now. I have taken my feelings 
                         of gratitude... and relief... and 
                         transferred them onto... you. I have 
                         taken all those warm, grateful 
                         emotions and confused them with 
                         feelings for you... So that now I am 
                         under the delusion...
                              (a deep breath)
                         ...that I am in love with you.

               Mumford appears frozen in his chair. There is a heavy silence 
               in the room. Sofie does not look back there.

                                     SOFIE
                         Hello?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Hello.

                                     SOFIE
                         I think you can understand why I 
                         have some serious questions about 
                         your methods. I mean, obviously it 
                         becomes much more likely that I'm 
                         going to have confusion about this 
                         when your idea of treatment is to go 
                         walking in the woods and up to make-
                         outs-ville and do all these highly 
                         romantic activities --

               Suddenly, Sofie's voice cracks. She is starting to cry, but 
               refuses to acknowledge it.

                                     SOFIE
                         -- We had a paper route together, 
                         for godssake! Do you understand how 
                         I might be a little resentful? Knowing 
                         that this so-called "love" I'm feeling 
                         is totally bogus, and just a pathetic 
                         case of... transference?

               Mumford doesn't know what to say. He's on the rack. Finally --

                                     MUMFORD
                         Yes.

               Silence. Then Sofie gets up, wiping at tears with the back 
               of her bare hand. Mumford jumps up to offer her a tissue, 
               but she ignores it. She will not meet his gaze.

                                     SOFIE
                         Maybe you ought to think about how 
                         you're going to fix this. And when 
                         you do...
                              (suddenly losing her 
                              will)
                         ...please get back to me.

               Sofie turns to go out through the waiting room, but after a 
               step, she stops, pirouettes and goes out the back.

               EXT. THE DUPLEX HOUSE - MAGIC

               Mumford comes up the street, lost in thought, and turns into 
               the driveway toward his stairs. Ainge leaps over the front 
               yard fence. Mumford pets the dog distractedly, still moving.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Hey, Ainge.

               Lily rises up suddenly from where she's been working in the 
               garden.

                                     LILY
                         Doc...

                                     MUMFORD
                              (keeps walking)
                         Lily.

                                     LILY
                         Doc.

               Mumford reluctantly stops. Lily comes up to the fence.

                                     LILY
                         I don't want you to be mad at Skip...

                                     MUMFORD
                         He told you.

                                     LILY
                              (yes)
                         Skip and I wouldn't have got together 
                         if it weren't for you. That's a big 
                         deal.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (dismisses it)
                         You would have met in some shower 
                         eventually...

                                     LILY
                         I want to give you something. Will 
                         you let me?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Thanks, Lily, I don't need anything.

                                     LILY
                         Yes, you do, you damn well do.

                                     MUMFORD
                              (can't fight)
                         Okay.

                                     LILY
                         Here it is, some advice -- do the 
                         hard thing.

                                     MUMFORD
                         That's it? That's what you're giving 
                         me?

                                     LILY
                         Clean up the mess. No matter what it 
                         takes.

               Mumford leans down to pet Ainge.

                                     MUMFORD
                         What it might take is... doing time.

                                     LILY
                         Too bad. That's tough, I mean it. 
                         I'm not unsympathetic. But Skip says 
                         you're in love.

               Mumford straightens, looks at Lily and acknowledges it.

                                     LILY
                         Then it's worth it.

               Mumford looks at Lily a long moment, then leans over the 
               fence and kisses her on the forehead. Ainge jumps back over 
               to her side.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I'll tell her tonight.

               Mumford turns and continues toward his stairs.

               INT. MUMFORD'S APARTMENT - MAGIC

               Mumford comes in, drops his coat, gets a carton of orange 
               juice out of the fridge and drinks directly from it. 
               Distracted, he picks up the remote from the kitchen counter 
               and switches on the TV, then opens his freezer and stares 
               inside.

               UNSOLVED MYSTERIES comes on. The opening segment previews a 
               story about a couple who claim to have had a visitation from 
               Gianni Versace, then one about a yacht that went down near 
               Venezuela. ROBERT STACK, in his characteristic fragmented 
               delivery, intones the preview for the last story, accompanied 
               by appropriate footage:

                                     ROBERT STACK
                         ...A drug rehabilitation center in 
                         the lonely southwestern desert... 
                         run by reclusive monks... becomes 
                         the point of departure in a mysterious 
                         vanishing...

               A CLOSE-UP of an IRS identification card featuring a picture 
               of a younger Mumford, badly photographed in suit and tie. 
               His name is not visible.

                                     ROBERT STACK
                         ...as an intrepid government 
                         investigator disappears -- without a 
                         trace.

               In the kitchen, Mumford spins to look. DISSOLVE TO:

               LATER IN THE PROGRAM. Documentary shots of IRS Headquarters, 
               etc., are INTERCUT with hokey-looking re-enactments from 
               Mumford's life -- with a YOUNG ACTOR who looks vaguely like 
               Mumford playing him.

               IN MUMFORD'S APARTMENT the telephone is RINGING. Clearly, 
               it's not the first time. Mumford, watching the show intently, 
               lifts the headset an inch from the cradle and then hangs up. 
               When it immediately RINGS AGAIN, Mumford takes it off the 
               hook, cuts off the call, and buries the headset under a sofa 
               cushion.

               ON THE SHOW: scenes of tax investigation -- in the show's 
               version the IRS guys have drawn guns and are storming houses -- 
               are interspersed with scenes of sordid drug-taking.

                                     ROBERT STACK
                         ...despite brilliant promise as a 
                         fearless investigator... found himself 
                         on a downward spiral of drug abuse 
                         and dissolution...

               MUMFORD'S SISTER, the real thing, a plain, middle-aged West 
               Virginia woman, appears in a "dramatic", badly-lit interview. 
               (As with all the interviewees, she is identified by a supered 
               title.)

                                     MUMFORD'S SISTER
                         ...we didn't talk much after our 
                         folks died, but I know he felt his 
                         life had taken a wrong turn...

               A snapshot of some IRS-era party, happy revelers posing for 
               a flash. Camera PUSHES IN on Mumford, smiling and high, his 
               neck encircled by Gregory's arm. Candy is on the other side 
               of Gregory.

               A shot of the Pennsylvania Turnpike as a State Police Cruiser 
               zips by.

                                     ROBERT STACK
                         His former undercover partner at the 
                         IRS... is now a trooper with the 
                         Pennsylvania State Police...

               GREGORY, in State Police uniform, with a sadistic glint in 
               his eye, is interviewed by the roadside, cars whipping by.

                                     GREGORY
                         The guy was obsessed... didn't always 
                         know where to draw the line... but I 
                         would have trusted him with my wife -- 
                         er, my life --
                              (looks off camera, 
                              laughing)
                         -- What'd I say? Both, actually...
                              (gets serious again)
                         ...I can't say I was surprised, 
                         though, when he disappeared.

               Ragged telephoto shots of the Drug Rehab Center in the desert, 
               low, innocuous adobe buildings.

                                     ROBERT STACK
                         Who was this enigma... a courageous 
                         public servant or a debauched 
                         addict?... Either way, his last known 
                         stop was here... isolated in the 
                         Arizona desert... taken in by an 
                         order of devoted monks...

               IN AN ARIZONA TOWN, a monk with a clerical collar, BROTHER 
               TIMOTHY, is loading groceries into the back of a pick-up. 
               He's being ambush interviewed. He's polite, but not 
               cooperative.

                                     BROTHER TIMOTHY
                         We don't talk about the people who've 
                         been our guests... but I can tell 
                         you this about our order -- we believe 
                         everybody has the right to start 
                         over... everybody deserves a second 
                         chance.

               Shots of wind-swept desert, cactus, and dust-blown highway.

                                     ROBERT STACK
                         And perhaps... that is exactly the 
                         chance the now-sober pilgrim took... 
                         on a blustery November day... walking 
                         away from the rehab center... never 
                         to be heard from again...

               MUMFORD'S SISTER AGAIN:

                                     MUMFORD'S SISTER
                         I'd like to know if he's alive. If 
                         he is, I just hope he's happy and 
                         his new life is...
                              (not sure how to put 
                              it)
                         ...well, I hope he's found what he 
                         was looking for...

               Mumford, in his apartment, watches with real emotion.

               His sister's face DISSOLVES into a new snapshot of Mumford, 
               dressed in an Orkin Exterminator uniform, as the MUSIC on 
               the show comes up. A 1-800 telephone number appears across 
               the bottom of the frame.

                                     ROBERT STACK
                         If you have any information about 
                         this man or know anything about his 
                         whereabouts, contact the Sheriff's 
                         Department in Cochise County, Arizona, 
                         or call this number...

               EXT. SECOND FLOOR PORCH, THE DUPLEX HOUSE - NIGHT

               Mumford comes out to the rail and looks off over the town of 
               Mumford.

               WHAT HE SEES (or imagines he sees): all across the nightscape, 
               one window in every house is glowing blue with flickering TV 
               light.

               EXT. COOK HOUSE - NIGHT

               MOVING IN on the porch steps. Mumford runs into the shot. In 
               fact, he's run the whole way from his place and he's out of 
               breath. He takes the porch steps three at a time, rings the 
               doorbell, and waits.

               Mrs. Cook peeks out, then opens the front door, an especially 
               sour look on her face. She speaks through the screen door.

                                     MRS. COOK
                         Well, look who's here...

                                     MUMFORD
                         Good evening, Mrs. Cook.

                                     MRS. COOK
                         Just who is here, can you tell me?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Could I see Sofie, please?

                                     MRS. COOK
                         No, you can not. I wouldn't know who 
                         to say is calling.

                                     SOFIE (O.S.)
                         Mother...

               Mrs. Cook glances inside at the as-yet-unseen Sofie, then 
               hisses at Mumford --

                                     MRS. COOK
                         I could see right through you from 
                         the start, you imposter. I know what 
                         you're after. I knew it then and I 
                         know it now!

               Sofie appears behind her mother.

                                     SOFIE
                         Mother...

                                     MUMFORD
                         What do you think I'm after, Mrs. 
                         Cook?

                                     MRS. COOK
                         Sofie. It's so obvious... you're 
                         after my daughter.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Well, I gotta say, Mrs. Cook, you're 
                         right about that.

               Both Sofie and Mrs. Cook are set back for a moment. Mrs. 
               Cook recovers fastest --

                                     MRS. COOK
                         It'll never happen! You're in big 
                         trouble, mister.

                                     SOFIE
                              (scary strong)
                         Mother... go away!

               Mr. Cook suddenly appears, takes Mrs. Cook by the arm and 
               makes her vanish. Sofie and Mumford are left alone. She looks 
               at him through the screen.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I guess you saw the show...?

                                     SOFIE
                         Which show was that?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Sofie...

                                     SOFIE
                         Part of it. We were watching "ER" 
                         until someone called.

                                     MUMFORD
                         You probably got the idea.

               Sofie comes outside. She doesn't get too close or look at 
               him as she walks to the other end of the porch.

                                     SOFIE
                         Do you know what a betrayal this 
                         is?...

               Mumford knows.

                                     SOFIE
                         ...How violated I feel?

                                     MUMFORD
                         You're not the only one...

               Sofie turns sharply to look at him, ready to blow up.

                                     SOFIE
                         You feel violated?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Not me... all my other my patients. 
                         I smelled tar and feathers on the 
                         way over here.

                                     SOFIE
                         You deserve it.

               Mumford agrees. He watches her closely.

                                     SOFIE
                         I should be irate.

               Mumford immediately perks up. Sofie tries to correct --

                                     SOFIE
                         I am irate!

                                     MUMFORD
                              (grabbing at the thread)
                         But...

                                     SOFIE
                         But nothing... I'm mad as hell. This 
                         is a terrible thing you've done.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I know it! Please believe me, I know 
                         that...

               Mumford steps closer to her.

                                     MUMFORD
                         But, there is one... mitigating factor 
                         I want you to consider before you 
                         write me off.

                                     SOFIE
                         What?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Will you think about it?

                                     SOFIE
                         I don't know. Depends. I'm in a bad 
                         mood.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I love you. More than I've ever loved 
                         anyone or anything in my life.

               She looks into his eyes.

                                     SOFIE
                         Oh.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I want to spend the rest of my life 
                         with you... but I'm not sure you 
                         feel the same way.

               She regards him for several moments, her mind racing.

                                     SOFIE
                         I sort of do...

               Mumford feels joy. Now, finally, he takes her in his arms.

                                     SOFIE
                         ...but first, you have to tell me 
                         something...

                                     MUMFORD
                         Anything... just ask.

                                     SOFIE
                         What is your name?

               As Mumford breaks into a huge grin, CUT TO:

               INT. COURTROOM, MUMFORD COUNTY COURTHOUSE - DAY

               Mumford is at the defense table. Lionel is his lawyer. Sofie, 
               Mr. Cook and Ben sit right behind the rail.

                                     JUDGE OTTO (O.S.)
                         The defendant will rise.

               Mumford and Lionel stand up.

                                     JUDGE OTTO (O.S.)
                         Sit down, Lionel.

               Lionel sits down, squelched again. We see JUDGE OTTO for the 
               first time, a tough guy in his sixties.

                                     JUDGE OTTO
                         Clarence Norman White, do you 
                         understand how serious are the crimes 
                         with which you have been charged?

                                     MUMFORD
                         I do.

                                     JUDGE OTTO
                         Do you realize how insidious it is 
                         to invade the most private thoughts 
                         and secret lives of unsuspecting 
                         people?...

               WE SEE there's a pretty big turnout for this hearing. 
               Prominent among the onlookers: Lily and Skip, sitting 
               together; Nessa and Martin, holding hands; Dr. Delbanco and 
               MRS. DELBANCO. Gilroy, from the State Certification Board, 
               sits with the PROSECUTOR.

                                     JUDGE OTTO
                         ...People who have come to you with 
                         the faith that you know what you're 
                         doing... and that you are who you 
                         say you are?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Yes, your honor.

                                     JUDGE OTTO
                         It means absolutely nothing to me 
                         that so many of your patients have 
                         come forward with praise for you and 
                         your therapeutic skills. You 
                         understand that?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Yes.

               Follett is sitting in one of the back rows, apparently alone. 
               But now he looks down the row. Althea is sitting down at the 
               end in a stylish suit, completely appropriate, but a size 
               too small.

               She gives Follett a sidelong glance, then crosses her legs 
               provocatively. Whatever fantasy they're currently enacting 
               is working really well for both of them.

                                     JUDGE OTTO
                         Mr. White, I am frustrated that the 
                         criminal code in this state allows a 
                         maximum sentence of only six months 
                         and a maximum fine of only $2000.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I'm sorry, your honor.

                                     JUDGE OTTO
                         What?

                                     MUMFORD
                         I'm sorry you're frustrated.

                                     JUDGE OTTO
                         Are you disrespecting this court, 
                         Mr. White?

                                     MUMFORD
                         No, sir. I was empathizing. Sorry.

                                     JUDGE OTTO
                         Maybe you can empathize with this -- 
                         Maximum fine. Three months in jail, 
                         three months house arrest. Sentence 
                         to begin immediately at the Orchard 
                         Valley Correctional Facility. Case 
                         closed. This court is adjourned.

               The judge slams down his gavel, stands up and stalks out. A 
               DEPUTY moves in to take custody of Mumford. Lionel stands up 
               and leans in --

                                     LIONEL
                         It's a country club. Don't worry 
                         about it.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Thanks for your help, Lionel.

               Mumford turns to face the Cooks. Mr. Cook and Ben shake his 
               hand like he's just won something. Lionel addresses them all 
               with his usual self-satisfaction --

                                     LIONEL
                         I'll have him out in half the time.

               WE PUSH IN on Mumford and Sofie, who embrace.

                                     SOFIE
                         You got off easy.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Will you wait for me?

                                     SOFIE
                         We're only talking about six weeks.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Will you be here?

                                     SOFIE
                         Of course... I haven't got the energy 
                         to get out of town that fast.

               They kiss. The Deputy takes Mumford's arm, and we --

                                                                    CUT TO:

               INT. STATE CORRECTIONAL SEDAN - DAY

               Mumford is alone in the backseat, handcuffed to a metal 
               restraint. A lone COUNTY CORRECTIONAL OFFICER is up front, 
               driving. There's a heavy security screen divider between 
               front and back.

                                     CORRECTIONAL OFFICER
                         Better make yourself comfortable. We 
                         got a three hour drive here.

                                     MUMFORD
                         I'm fine.

                                     CORRECTIONAL OFFICER
                         You're the shrink, aren't you?

                                     MUMFORD
                         No, not really.

                                     CORRECTIONAL OFFICER
                         But you do therapy?

                                     MUMFORD
                         Not any more.

               They ride along in silence. At peace, Mumford watches the 
               town go by. Finally --

                                     CORRECTIONAL OFFICER
                         I'll tell you, Doc, the wife and I, 
                         we got a little bit of a problem. 
                         Would you mind if I just ran it by 
                         you?

               The Correctional Officer watches Mumford in the rear view 
               mirror, waiting hopefully. Mumford ponders the question a 
               long time, then gives a "what the hell" shrug.

                                     MUMFORD
                         Go ahead.

               EXT. MAIN STREET, EDGE OF TOWN - DAY

               The State Correctional Sedan heads out of the business 
               district toward the highway, leaving the town of Mumford 
               behind.

               FADE OUT.

                                         THE END