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Taking Sides Movie Script

Writer(s) : Ronald Harwood

Genres : Drama

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                                      TAKING SIDES

                                    by Ronald Harwood

                                adapted from the play by
                                     Ronald Harwood





                                                       Final Draft, 1988

               FADE IN:

               INT. BERLIN CONCERT HALL (1944) - NIGHT

               A man conducting Beethoven.  Air raid in progress.  Bombs 
               falling nearby.  The orchestra continues to play.  Suddenly 
               the lights go out.  The music stops. 

               INT. BACKSTAGE CORRIDOR, CONCERT HALL - NIGHT

               A beam from a torch, bouncing, making shadows.  An 
               ATTENDANT, carrying the torch, hurries down the corridor.  
               The air raid continues.

               He comes to a door, knocks, opens it and looks in.

                                     ATTENDANT
                              (agitated)
                         Dr. Furtw�ngler, the Reichsminister.

               The sound of heavy footsteps approaching.  The attendant 
               turns his torch to light the way for three men in Nazi 
               uniform, also with attendants and torches, marching down 
               the corridor.

               The attendant bows deeply as the REICHSMINISTER and his 
               aide go through the door. The other man remains in the 
               corridor on guard.

               INT. CONDUCTOR'S ROOM - NIGHT

               Candles light the room where the conductor shakes hands 
               with the Reichsminister.

                                     REICHSMINISTER
                         Dr. Furtw�ngler, I want to apologise 
                         personally for this power failure.  
                         I was so enjoying the performance.  
                         In times like these we need 
                         spiritual nourishment.

               A bomb explodes nearby.

                                     REICHSMINISTER
                         But I welcome this unexpected 
                         opportunity of talking to you.
                              (with great care)
                         When you came on to the platform 
                         tonight, I thought you weren't 
                         well.  You looked tired,
                              (a warning)
                         Get away from this bombing.
                         Away from the war.  Yes, you look 
                         tired...
                              (a crooked smile)
                         Even in this light.

               INT. RUINED CINEMA - DAY

               Dark.  ON A SCREEN: scenes from Leni Riefenstahl's triumph 
               of the will. Over this:

                                     A MAN'S VOICE
                         Look at them. Men, women, kids. 
                         Boy, did they love him. You see, 
                         Steve, Adolf Hitler touched 
                         something deep, real deep and savage 
                         and barbaric, and it won't just go 
                         away overnight. It's got to be 
                         rooted out. You know what I think? 
                         I think they were all Nazis. And 
                         let's face it, their leaders, those 
                         bastards now on trial in Nuremberg, 
                         couldn't have done it alone. It's 
                         these people, they gave all the 
                         help that was needed. Willingly.

               The film changes with a scratchy music soundtrack - Wagner. 
               SHOTS of high-ranking Nazis in an audience including Josef 
               Goebbels, listening. And they're listening to and watching 
               Wilhelm Furtw�ngler conducting. At the appropriate moment:
		 
                                     THE MAN'S VOICE
                         That's him.  Furtw�ngler. Wilhelm 
                         Furtw�ngler.

               The Nazis applaud. Goebbels shakes hands with Furtw�ngler. 
               The film ends. 

               Sitting in the ruined cinema are two men: GENERAL WALLACE, 
               with files on the table, and, beside him, MAJOR STEVE 
               ARNOLD. A PROJECTIONIST is standing in the door of the 
               projection room.

                                     WALLACE
                         So, you never heard of him.

                                     STEVE
                         Nope.

                                     WALLACE
                         Do you know who Arturo Toscanini 
                         is?

                                     STEVE
                         Sure.

                                     WALLACE
                         He's as big as Toscanini, maybe 
                         even bigger. In this neck of the 
                         woods, he's probably Bob Hope and 
                         Betty Grable rolled into one.

                                     STEVE
                         Jeez, and I never heard of him.

               Wallace glances at the file.

                                     WALLACE
                         You were in insurance before the 
                         war.

                                     STEVE
                         Right. Claims assessor.

                                     WALLACE
                         Conscientious, determined, dogged.

                                     STEVE
                              (amused)
                         They said I was dogged?

                                     WALLACE
                         Well, they say here that when you 
                         went on a case, you stayed on it.
                              (looks up at Steve.)
                         Now we can't take every Nazi in 
                         this country to trial, although I 
                         would like to; it's an 
                         impossibility. So we're going for 
                         the big boys in industry, education, 
                         law, culture.

                                     STEVE
                         Like this bandleader.

                                     WALLACE
                              (a smile)
                         Well, he's more than just a 
                         bandleader, Steve. He's a great 
                         conductor, a gifted artist. But we 
                         believe that he sold himself to 
                         the devil. Your number one priority 
                         from this moment on is to connect 
                         him to the Nazi Party. Don't be 
                         impressed by him. I want the folks 
                         back home to understand why we 
                         fought this war. Find Wilhelm 
                         Furtw�ngler guilty. He represents 
                         everything that was rotten in 
                         Germany.

               Steve wants to rise, but Wallace puts a hand on his shoulder 
               to make him sit again.

                                     WALLACE
                         Stay put, Steve. There is some 
                         other stuff that I'd like for you 
                         to see here. Background.

               He nods to the projectionist, then starts to go, but stops.

                                     WALLACE
                         Oh, one thing that may be a problem. 
                         Our Occupation Authorities in 
                         Wiesbaden have a duty to help these 
                         poor unfortunates with their 
                         defence. They keep repeating: 'We 
                         must be just, we must be seen to 
                         be just.' Well, I've only one thing 
                         to say to the liberals in Wiesbaden: 
                         fuck 'em.
                              (as he goes)
                         You answer to no one but me. Is 
                         that understood?
                              (to the projectionist 
                              in the door)
                         Show him the film.

                                     PROJECTIONIST
                         Yes, sir. Roll it.

               Wallace goes. The projectionist starts the next reel.

               ON THE SCREEN: a Berlin sequence. Bombs falling. Ruins, a 
               city devastated, empty. Flags of the four allied nations. 
               Posters of Truman, Stalin, Churchill.

                                     ARCHIVE FILM VOICE
                         That is the hand that dropped the 
                         bombs on defenceless Rotterdam, 
                         Brussels, Belgrade. That is the 
                         hand that destroyed the cities, 
                         villages and homes of Russia. That 
                         is the hand that held the whip 
                         over the Polish, Yugoslav, French 
                         and Norwegian slaves. That is the 
                         hand that took their food.

               Steve watches expressionless.

                                     WALLACE
                         Next reel, please.  

               ON THE SCREEN: SHOTS of camp survivors. Then SHOTS of 
               emaciated corpses being bulldozed into mass graves.

                                     ARCHIVE FILM
                         Sanitary conditions were so 
                         appalling that heavy equipment had 
                         to be brought in to speed the work 
                         of cleaning up. This was Bergen 
                         Belsen.

               The moment this appears, Steve rises and goes quickly. 

               ON THE SCREEN: piles of cadavers.

               INT. MAJOR STEVE ARNOLD'S BEDROOM (I945) - NIGHT

               Steve having a nightmare, twisting, turning, moaning. He 
               wakes with a cry. He is sweating. He turns on the light, 
               looks at a clock, reaches for a cigarette, lights it. He 
               smokes. He stares at the ceiling.

               Later:

               Early morning. Cold. Steve is at the basin in his small 
               room, shaving. A radio on a shelf.

                                     AMERICAN RADIO VOICE
                         Remember, men, no fraternisation. 
                         In a German town, if you bow to a 
                         pretty girl or pat a blond child, 
                         you bow to all that Hitler stood 
                         for. You bow to his reign of blood.  
                         You caress the ideology that meant 
                         death and destruction. You never 
                         know who was a member of the Nazi 
                         Party. Don't be fooled. Don't 
                         fraternise.

               EXT. STEVE'S OFFICE BUILDING, BERLIN - DAY

               Steve's car swerves round the corner and comes to a halt. 
               A small crowd watch workmen on ladders hammering away at a 
               stone swastika above the portico. American soldiers 
               supervise. Steve gets out of the car, carrying an attache 
               case, and he, too, watches as the stone swastika falls and 
               crashes into pieces on the road. One or two people clap, 
               most just stare.  

               The American soldiers immediately hoist the Stars and 
               Stripes. Steve goes into the building. The sentry salutes.

               The driver of the car goes to the trunk and takes out a 
               labelled duffel bag, cans of film, a case which holds a 16-
               mm projector. A small BOY sidles up to him:

                                     BOY
                         Cigarettes, chewing gum?

               INT. WAITING ROOM - DAY

               Steve and Sergeant Adams ascending a grand, winding but 
               damaged staircase to the rear of a spacious entrance hall. 
               A once impressive building. Signs of bomb damage everywhere. 
               German workmen doing repairs. American military personnel 
               coming and going, saluting Steve, who barely acknowledges 
               them.

               They reach the landing. Adams opens double doors and they 
               go through.

                                     ADAMS
                         We're gonna have the heating fixed 
                         by tonight.

               A few gilt chairs, a workman trying to repair the stove. 
               Adams opens another door for Steve.

               INT. STEVE S OFFICE - DAY

               EMMI is hanging the standard photograph of President Truman 
               on the wall. She turns to see Steve and Adams and is covered 
               with confusion. She gives Steve a little curtsey.

                                     ADAMS
                         Fr�ulein, this is Major Arnold. 
                         Sir, this is your secretary, 
                         Fr�ulein Emmi Straube. Her file's 
                         on your desk. They sent her over 
                         from Admin. I'll leave you to it.

               He goes. Steve scrutinises Emmi. She's embarrassed, keeps 
               her eyes downcast. Steve goes to his desk, opens a file, 
               reads.

                                     STEVE
                         You live here, in Berlin?

                                     EMMI
                         Yes.

                                     STEVE
                         You do shorthand and typing?

                                     EMMI
                         Yes.

               He nods, goes on reading.

                                     STEVE
                         Okay, let's see. How long were you 
                         in the camp for?

                                     EMMI
                         Three months.

                                     STEVE
                         Says here because of your father. 
                         What's that mean?

                                     EMMI
                         My father was one of the officers 
                         in the plot against Hitler. They 
                         arrested the plotters and their 
                         families.

                                     STEVE
                         Your mother, too.

                                     EMMI
                         Yes. She suffered longer. She was 
                         in Ravensbruck.

                                     STEVE
                         And your father was executed.

               She nods, keeps her eyes averted. He smiles sympathetically.

                                     STEVE
                         I'm gonna call you Emmi, you're 
                         gonna call me Steve. Okay?

               No response.

                                     STEVE
                         I got a list of stuff here I'd 
                         like you to get for me.

               He searches his pockets.

                                     ADAMS
                         If you need anything, let me know.

                                     EMMI
                         Major...

                                     STEVE
                         Steve.

                                     EMMI
                         There have been messages for you.
                              (She consults the 
                              pad.)
                         A Lieutenant David Wills called 
                         from the Allied Kommandatura 
                         Cultural Affairs office in 
                         Wiesbaden. I don't know who he is.

               Steve starts to unpack his attache case.

                                     EMMI
                         Then there have been three calls 
                         from Dr. Furtw�ngler wanting to 
                         know when you wish to see him. I 
                         did not speak to him personally...

               She hands Steve a typewritten sheet. He ignores it, finds 
               a list which he hands to her. He waits for her to read, 
               then:

                                     STEVE
                         Think you can get me any of that?

                                     EMMI
                              (pleased)
                         Oh yes, Major, I have recordings 
                         of all his symphonies. I kept them 
                         safe during the bombing. My 
                         favourite is the Seventh Symphony.

                                     STEVE
                         Mine's the Eleventh.

                                     EMMI
                              (puzzled)
                         But... he only wrote nine, Major.

                                     STEVE
                         I'm kidding, Emmi. What about a 
                         record player? You have that, too?

                                     EMMI
                         No. Ours was damaged.

                                     STEVE
                              (surveys the room)
                         What's in those files?

                                     EMMI
                         The names of the members of the 
                         Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra since 
                         1934 together with their 
                         questionnaires.  Major, what am I 
                         to tell Dr. Furtw�ngler?

                                     STEVE
                         You tell him nothing, Emmi. If he 
                         calls again, you say you know 
                         nothing. We're gonna keep him 
                         waiting while I get acquainted 
                         with his case and with the 
                         witnesses. And, God help me, with 
                         Beethoven.

               He smiles. She tries to smile back.

               EXT. FLEA MARKET, BERLIN - DAY

               Freezing weather. A narrow street, crowded, busy, noisy. 
               Some makeshift stalls set out, trestle tables, open 
               suitcases, people buying and selling every imaginable 
               commodity.  

               Emmi wanders through the crowd, passing a violinist, Helmuth 
               Rode, wrapped up against the cold, playing Handel's Air on 
               a G String, a bowl for money at his feet. A passer-by drops 
               a cigarette butt in it.  Immediately, Rode retrieves the 
               butt.

               Emmi comes to a stall selling piles of gramophone records. 
               She asks the stallholder a question. He points to another 
               stall across the way.

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - DAY

               Steve at his desk, paging through files. A knock on the 
               door.

                                     STEVE
                         Yeah.

               Lieutenant DAVID WILLS, aged twenty-four, enters, comes to 
               Steve's desk, stands to attention, salutes.

                                     DAVID
                         Lieutenant Wills reporting to Major 
                         Arnold. Sir.

                                     STEVE
                         For Chrissakes I hate that shit, 
                         cut it out.

                                     DAVID
                         I'm very sorry.

                                     STEVE
                         I'm Steve. What's your name?

                                     DAVID
                         David. David Wills. I'm your liaison 
                         officer with the Allied Kommandatura 
                         Cultural Affairs Committee. Sir.

                                     STEVE
                         Sounds a lot of run.
                              (studies David.)
                         So they sent the big guns to check 
                         up on me. We recruiting children 
                         now?

                                     DAVID
                              (smiles')
                         I guess so, sir.

                                     STEVE
                         You call me sir again and I'll 
                         make you listen to Beethoven.

               David half-smiles.

                                     STEVE
                         Where you from, David?

                                     DAVID
                         was born here, in Leipzig. I escaped 
                         in '36. My parents, they sent me 
                         to my uncle in Philadelphia. They 
                         were to follow. But they delayed 
                         and...

               Breaks off. Nothing from Steve.

                                     DAVID
                         Our family name was Weill. But 
                         that doesn't sound well in English. 
                         My uncle changed it to Wills and...

               The door opens and Emmi enters carrying a record player, 
               sees David and starts to back out.

                                     EMMI
                         I'm sorry.

                                     STEVE
                         Come in, Emmi, this is your office, 
                         too. Emmi, this is Lieutenant David 
                         Wills.

               They nod briefly.

                                     STEVE
                         He is here to watch over us.

               A flick from Emmi.

                                     STEVE
                         I guess you admire musicians.

                                     DAVID
                         Some.

                                     STEVE
                         Don't. This is like a criminal 
                         investigation, David. Musicians, 
                         morticians, doctors, lawyers, 
                         butchers, clerks. They're all the 
                         same.

               For Emmi's benefit too. She becomes still, listens.

                                     STEVE
                         We have a duty, a moral duty.

               David takes a few files, sits and starts to look through 
               them. Steve returns to his files. Emmi, by now, has put on 
               a record and starts to play it: the opening of Beethoven's 
               Fifth Symphony blasts out.

               The two men look up, startled. Emmi beams:

                                     EMMI
                         It works!  Hallelujah!

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - DAY

               Emmi at the door. Steve at his desk. David present.  

                                     EMMI
                         Herr Rudolf Werner.  

               WERNER enters, bows to Steve and David. Emmi goes to her 
               desk.

                                     STEVE
                         Sit down, Werner. 

               Indicates the upright chair; Werner sits.

                                     STEVE
                         I want you to understand why you're 
                         here. This is an investigation 
                         into Wilhelm Furtw�ngler, former 
                         Prussian Privy Councillor, banned 
                         from public life under Control 
                         Council Directive No 24 and who's 
                         applied to come before the Tribunal 
                         of Artists of the Denazification 
                         Commission. I'm interested in what 
                         he was up to from 1933 to the end 
                         of the war, understood?

               Werner nods.

                                     STEVE
                         Rudolf Otto Werner. Wind section 
                         since 1936. What instrument did 
                         you play?

                                     WERNER
                         First oboe.

                                     STEVE
                         I have your questionnaire here. It 
                         says you were never a member of 
                         the Nazi Party.

                                     WERNER
                         Absolutely not.

               Long silence; Steve watches him. Werner is made more 
               anxious. At last, in a rush:

                                     WERNER
                         No, I was never a Nazi, I have no 
                         interest in politics, I'm a musician -

                                     STEVE
                         Hey, hey, slow up, Fraulein Straube 
                         has to take down what you say.

               Werner swivels round to look at Emmi.

                                     WERNER
                         Straube? Any relation to Colonel 
                         Joachim Straube?

                                     EMMI
                         My father.

                                     WERNER
                         It's a great honour to meet you, 
                         Fraulein. Your father was a great 
                         patriot.

               Brief silence.

                                     WERNER
                         Dr. Furtw�ngler is a great musician. 
                         He actively opposed the Nazis and 
                         later on he helped many Jews to 
                         escape.

                                     STEVE
                         Then how do you explain him being 
                         made a Prussian Privy Councillor?

                                     WERNER
                         It was Hermann Goering. I was told 
                         he just made the maestro his Privy 
                         Councillor, no questions asked. 
                         Although Dr. Furtw�ngler stood up 
                         to him. And to Dr. Goebbels.

                                     STEVE
                         He also conducted for Hitler, didn't 
                         he?

                                     WERNER
                         Yes, that's true, but he refused 
                         to give the Nazi salute. He kept 
                         his baton in his right hand. In 
                         Hitler's presence. That was a brave 
                         act...

                                     STEVE
                         Brave?  To celebrate Hitler's 
                         birthday with some heroic piece by 
                         Wagner but without the Nazi salute? 
                         Bravo.

                                     WERNER
                         It was Beethoven's Ninth.

                                     STEVE
                         Do you really think it was brave? 
                         Didn't he bow to him and shake his 
                         hand?

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - DAY

               Another man, SCHLEE, is in the chair. Only Steve and Emmi 
               now. Pale, yellow electric light. Silence. Schlee, too, is 
               very nervous. At last:

                                     SCHLEE
                         No, no, no, I give you my word. I 
                         was never a member of the Nazi 
                         Party. Never. I am in the percussion 
                         section. I play the timpani.

               Steve just stares at him.

                                     SCHLEE
                         Anyway, they would never have 
                         allowed it. My brother was married 
                         to a Jewess, may she rest in peace. 
                         And Goebbels said...
                              (to Emmi)
                         ...please take this down carefully, 
                         because it's most important, 
                         Fraulein?

                                     EMMI
                         Straube.

                                     SCHLEE
                              (acting surprised)
                         Straube? Are you by any chance 
                         related to Colonel Joachim Straube?

                                     EMMI
                         My father.

                                     SCHLEE
                         He was... he was a great hero.

               Steve lights a cigarette.

                                     SCHLEE
                         Goebbels, yes, Josef Goebbels said, 
                         'There's not a single filthy Jew 
                         left in Germany on whose behalf 
                         Dr. Furtw�ngler has not intervened.' 
                         No, no one could have been less of 
                         a Nazi than Dr. Furtw�ngler.

                                     STEVE
                         But this was the same guy who 
                         conducted for Adolf on his birthday.

                                     SCHLEE
                         He was forced to do that. But he 
                         refused to give the Nazi salute in 
                         front of Hitler. He kept his baton 
                         in his hand, you can't salute with 
                         a baton in your hand.

                                     DAVID
                         And what about the Nuremberg Rally?

                                     SCHLEE
                         No, we...we played on the evening 
                         before the Rally.

                                     STEVE
                              (straight-faced)
                         Oh! The evening before, I see...

                                     SCHLEE
                         Yes, Dr. Furtw�ngler was absolutely 
                         clear about this: politics and art 
                         must be kept separate.

                                     STEVE
                         Politics and art must be kept 
                         separate. I'll remember that. But 
                         let me see if you can help me with 
                         something I just don't understand. 
                         I'd really like to know why all 
                         you guys are so crazy about him. 
                         What's his secret?

               Schlee tries to find words.

                                     SCHLEE
                         Well, it's hard to explain. I can 
                         only tell you from my own 
                         experience. Soon after I joined 
                         the orchestra, we were rehearsing 
                         the Third Symphony of Beethoven, 
                         the Eroica. There are several rather 
                         difficult passages for the timpani. 
                         One particular crescendo. During 
                         the break, I asked how he wanted 
                         it played. He was studying his 
                         score. He didn't look up. He said, 
                         'Just watch me.'  So, of course, I 
                         did. I never stopped watching him. 
                         The moment came. And suddenly, he 
                         turned to me and our eyes were 
                         locked. There was something in his 
                         look that...  that simply demanded 
                         the crescendo. I shall never forget 
                         his look. It was a moment of... of 
                         magic.

               Steve nods, thinks for a moment. Then:

                                     STEVE
                         You ever seen Adolf Hitler's eyes 
                         when he was making a speech? I've 
                         seen 'em on films.

                                     SCHLEE
                         Yes.

                                     STEVE
                         Was looking at Furtw�ngler like 
                         that?

                                     SCHLEE
                         I don't know what you mean, Major.

                                     STEVE
                         When you got to the crescendo.

               Schlee looks at him bewildered.

               INT./EXT. CAR (TRAVELLING), LAKESIDE AND MANSION - DAY

               In the back, David and Steve. Military driver. The car's 
               making its way along a road that skirts a lake towards a 
               grand mansion from which fly the four Allied flags.

                                     STEVE
                         You think a whole orchestra, what, 
                         a hundred and forty or so guys, 
                         could be orchestrated?

                                     DAVID
                         I guess it's possible.

                                     STEVE
                         So, what does the Russki want?

                                     DAVID
                         Colonel Dymshitz asked specially 
                         to see you.

                                     STEVE
                         'Dim-shits'?

               INT. THE MANSION - DAY

               A huge, cavernous room, once the ballroom.  

               In the centre, a table with four chairs. To one side, 
               antique furniture, objets d'art, paintings. Four Allied 
               officers are surveying the treasures: COLONEL DYMSHITZ, 
               COLONEL GREEN (American), MAJOR RICHARDS (British) and 
               CAPTAIN VERNAY (French). What they say is barely audible, 
               low mumbles. They're accompanied by aides with clipboards, 
               taking notes.

               Beyond, and some distance away, a row of gilt chairs for 
               observers where David and Steve take their seats.

                                     STEVE
                         What the hell are they doing?

                                     DAVID
                              (whispered)
                         They're trying to sort out some of 
                         the works of art the Nazis stole 
                         from occupied territories. Who 
                         really owns what? That's Colonel 
                         Dymshitz, on the far side.

               Dymshitz, small, intelligent face, cunning eyes.

                                     DAVID'S VOICE
                         art historian, head of the famous 
                         Leningrad Museum of Art. He is an 
                         expert on German culture.

               Green, correct, formal, precise, immaculate. Richards, 
               bespectacled and nondescript. Vernay, upright, proud.

                                     VERNAY
                              (suddenly raising 
                              his voice)
                         Je suis navr�, Colonel, cette 
                         peinture n'est pas la propri�t� de 
                         I'union sovi�tique mats bien cette 
                         de la France.

                                     GREEN
                         What's he saying? Henri, what is 
                         you saying?

                                     AMERICAN AIDE
                         He's saying that picture is the 
                         property of France

                                     VERNAY
                         C'est un Braque qui avec Picasso 
                         �tait un des pionniers du cubisme.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                              (in French)
                         I know who Georges Braque is, 
                         Captain.

                                     AMERICAN AIDE
                              (almost 
                              simultaneously)
                         It's a Barque. 

                                     FRENCH AIDE
                         We can produce the provenance of 
                         this Braque, you say provenance?

               INT./EXT. SALON OFF THE BALLROOM AND TERRACE - DAY

               Outside the club room for the participants. Buzz of 
               conversation, clink of glasses, cups. The terrace is 
               deserted.

               A waiter carries a tray with various refreshments to a 
               quiet corner where Dymshitz, Green, Vernay, his aide 
               LIEUTENANT SIMON, Steve and David sit in comfortable 
               armchairs. The waiter serves them. During this:

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         Hello, Major, my name is Dymshitz. 
                         I'm glad to see you.

                                     STEVE
                         Colonel. Pleasure.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         So, Major, tell me, have you 
                         questioned Dr. Furtw�ngler?

                                     STEVE
                         Not yet.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         I've had two meetings with him. 
                         He's a great musician. Maybe the 
                         greatest conductor in the world. 
                         His Brahms, Beethoven, Schubert - 
                         unequalled.

               Steve makes a non-committal gesture.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         I'll come straight to point. I've 
                         offered him a very attractive 
                         position. Conductor of the 
                         Staatsoper Unten den Linden. He 
                         refused. But I want him. I want 
                         him badly. And I want your help.

                                     GREEN
                         Hey, just a moment, you should 
                         have discussed this with me first.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         I'm discussing it with you now. 
                         Major, I want you to drop your 
                         investigation, save everybody time 
                         and trouble.

                                     GREEN
                         We can't drop a case just like 
                         that.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         I'll give you another conductor in 
                         exchange or writer, musician, actor 
                         what...what do you care?  But I 
                         like Furtw�ngler. He's my favourite 
                         conductor.
                              (chuckles.)
                         Mine and Hitler's. He's our 
                         favourite conductor.

               INT. WAITING ROOM - DAY

               Rode is seated, waiting. Nervous, tense. The sound of 
               laughter, David's laughter from the office. It makes him 
               even more uncomfortable.

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE SUITE - DAY

               Emmi and David laughing.

                                     DAVID
                         I clicked my heels, saluted and 
                         bowed at the same time.

               He demonstrates. She laughs again.

                                     EMMI
                         That's because you had a proper 
                         upbringing.

                                     DAVID
                         That's right. I was raised very 
                         strictly. So don't speak before 
                         you are spoken to!

                                     EMMI
                         Oh! And don't wave your hands about!

                                     DAVID
                         Respect your elders and your 
                         betters!

                                     EMMI
                         And no elbows on the table!

                                     DAVID
                         Eating is eating... and...

                                     EMMI
                         And talking is talking! Well, I 
                         think we better get on.

                                     DAVID
                         Right. So, this is going to be 
                         very formal, too, now. Lieutenant 
                         David Wills requests die pleasure 
                         of die company of Fraulein Emmi 
                         Straube at dinner any night she 
                         cares.

               She smiles just as Steve bursts in. He's in a bright, 
               cheerful, energetic mood.

               David draws back guiltily. Emmi, embarrassed, hesitates 
               then turns to the typewriter and types furiously. Seeing 
               this, Steve stops, but just for a brief moment. Then, as 
               he goes to his desk:

                                     STEVE
                         David, need to ask you something. 
                         You heard this rumour the British 
                         found something called the Hinkel 
                         Archive?

                                     DAVID
                         Yes. 

                                     STEVE
                         So what is it? 

                                     DAVID
                         The British occupy the building 
                         where this guy, Hinkel, ran the 
                         Nazi Ministry of Culture and it 
                         seems they've... they've discovered 
                         his secret archive.

                                     STEVE
                         What's that mean?

                                     DAVID
                         I don't know, but the British are 
                         excited about it, I know that. The 
                         rumour is Hinkel kept a file on 
                         every artist working in the Third 
                         Reich.

                                     STEVE
                         Jeez. And you think the British'll 
                         share it with their Allies?

                                     DAVID
                         Major Richards said he'd call to 
                         let us know.

                                     STEVE
                         That's big of him.

               He looks from David to Emmi as if trying to work out 
               something.  Then:

                                     STEVE
                         Okay, better question the next 
                         witness. I bet you a bottle of 
                         French champagne he tells us the 
                         baton story inside ten minutes.

                                     DAVID
                         Five minutes.

                                     STEVE
                         It's a bet. You're the witness, 
                         Emmi.

               Later.

               Rode in the witness chair. Steve studying the file. David 
               and Emmi ready to take notes.

                                     STEVE
                         Helmuth Alfred Rode. Second 
                         violinist since 1935. What's it 
                         mean, second violinist?

                                     RODE
                         It means I wasn't good enough to 
                         be a first violinist.

               He chuckles, looks around for approval. Steve grins 
               encouragingly.

                                     STEVE
                         Good, and according to your 
                         questionnaire, Helmuth, you never 
                         joined the Nazi Party.

                                     RODE
                         Me? Never.  Never.

               Long silence. 

                                     RODE
                         I... I know everyone now says they 
                         were never Nazis but in my case it 
                         is absolutely one hundred per cent 
                         true. I am a Catholic, it would 
                         have been totally against my 
                         conscience.

               Silence.

               Steve lights a cigarette; Rode eyes it hungrily.

                                     RODE
                         Is it true you're going to interview 
                         Dr. Furtw�ngler today?

                                     STEVE
                         I'll ask the questions, Helmuth.

                                     RODE
                         Excuse me. Did you know that he 
                         refused to give the Nazi salute 
                         when Hitler was present in the 
                         audience?

               Steve flicks David a glance, waggles his finger like a 
               baton.

                                     RODE
                         The problem was how could he avoid 
                         giving the Devil's salute when 
                         Satan was actually sitting there.
                              (modestly taps his 
                              chest with his 
                              thumb.)
                         And, I said, 'Dr. Furtw�ngler, why 
                         not enter with the baton in your 
                         right hand? Hitler will be sitting 
                         in the front row. If you give the 
                         salute with the baton in your right 
                         hand it'll look like you're going 
                         to poke his eyes out.'

               Chuckles. David mouths I win to Steve.

                                     RODE
                         He was...He was really grateful to 
                         me for that. After the concert, 
                         I... I stole that baton as a memento 
                         of a great act of courage. I still 
                         have it. I should have brought it 
                         to show you. I hope I'm not going 
                         too fast for you, Fraulein?-

                                     EMMI
                         Straube.

               Steve and David exchange a brief look.

                                     RODE
                         Straube. Any relation to Colonel 
                         Joachim Straube?

                                     EMMI
                         My father.

                                     RODE
                              (standing)
                         I am deeply honoured to be in your 
                         presence, Fraulein Straube. Your 
                         father was a true patriot, a man 
                         of God.

               He crosses himself. Silence. David raises a discreet finger.

                                     STEVE
                         You have a question for Helmuth, 
                         David?

                                     DAVID
                         Yes. What was the orchestra's 
                         reaction when they asked you to 
                         play for Hitler's birthday?

                                     RODE
                         Oh, we didn't play for his birthday, 
                         we played the evening before - it 
                         was the 19th of April not the 20th.

                                     STEVE
                         Do you know Hans Hinkel?

                                     RODE
                              (alarmed)
                         Do I know Hans Hinkel?

                                     STEVE
                         That's what I asked.

                                     RODE
                         Do I know Hans Hinkel?

                                     STEVE
                         You seem to understand the question, 
                         now how about answering it?

                                     RODE
                         Hans Hinkel was in the Ministry of 
                         Culture; how could I know such a 
                         man?  I

               Brief silence; a smile.

                                     RODE
                         I hear the British have his... his 
                         archive, files, records.

                                     STEVE
                         Do you know what's in this archive?

                                     RODE
                         How could I know what's in the 
                         archive?

               Steve nods, smiles.

                                     STEVE
                         Okay, you can go now, Helmuth. Get 
                         out.

               Rode stands and bows.

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - NIGHT

               The final bars of the Fifth Symphony. Snowing. Dim light. 
               There is more furniture now: two chairs, one comfortable, 
               the other upright.  A sitting area by the window with the 
               telephone extension. The 16-mm projector set up in another 
               corner.

               Steve, at his desk, wrapped up against the cold, going 
               through files, making notes. He stops, seems to listen, 
               then goes to the window, looks out.

               The music ends. The record hisses. Steve just stares out 
               at the night and the snow. The record continues to hiss.

               INT./EXT TRAM, BERLIN (TRAVELLING) - DAY

               The tram packed to overflowing. Then, a sudden stir among 
               the passengers as people push through trying to find space.  
               One of them is FURTW�NGLER. He's recognised. Whispering. 
               He stares ahead or keeps his eyes downcast. An elderly man 
               tugs at his coat, half-rises, offering his seat.  
               Furtw�ngler manages a smile and shakes his head. The tram 
               rattles on.

               INT. HALL, STEVE'S BUILDING - DAY

               Furtw�ngler approaches Adams at his desk.

               He crosses to the stairs. German workmen stop what they 
               are doing to let him pass. One of them bows.

               On the upper landing, Emmi is making her way to Steve's 
               office.

               She stops, sees Furtw�ngler on the stairs and then dashes 
               to Steve's door.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Furtw�ngler.

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - DAY

               Emmi bursts in on Steve and David. She's overawed:

                                     EMMI
                         Major, Major... he's here ...

                                     STEVE
                         Shut the door, Emmi. Sit down, 
                         Emmi. We're going to keep him 
                         waiting, too.

               Emmi glances out again and reluctantly closes the door, 
               Steve sits calmly, relaxed.

                                     STEVE
                         Emmi, get us some coffee, will 
                         you? And, Emmi, don't offer him 
                         coffee. Don't even greet him, okay?

               INT. WAITING ROOM - DAY

               Furtw�ngler sits, waiting. Emmi, deeply embarrassed, hurries 
               through.. Furtw�ngler is about to ask her something, but 
               she's gone. He waits.

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - DAY

               Steve and David preparing papers.

               INT. WAITING ROOM - DAY

               Furtw�ngler waiting. Emmi enters from the landing door 
               carrying a tray and three mugs of coffee. She hurries 
               towards the office door, eyes downcast.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Fraulein?

               Emmi stops.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         How long am I to be kept waiting?

               Emmi bites her lip and, without looking at him, disappears 
               into the office.  Furtw�ngler closes his eyes, breathes 
               deeply.

               He stands, goes to the window, looks out.

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - DAY

               Silence. Steve studying his notes. David watching him. 
               Emmi staring forlornly into space.

                                     STEVE
                         Okay, Emmi, go get him.

               Emmi rises, opens the door, nods, turns back to Steve.

                                     EMMI
                         Dr. Furtw�ngler.

               Furtw�ngler enters. As he passes her, Emmi gives him a 
               small curtsey. David nods. Steve doesn't look up.  
               Furtw�ngler waits a moment, glances round, sees the more 
               comfortable chair and sits in it. Steve looks up.

                                     STEVE
                         I didn't hear anyone invite you to 
                         sit down.

               Furtw�ngler stands. Steve points to the other chair.

                                     STEVE
                         Sit there.

               Furtw�ngler sits.

                                     STEVE
                         I want you to understand why you're 
                         here. You're automatically banned 
                         from public life under Control 
                         Council Directive No 24. We're 
                         here to look into your case before 
                         you appear in front of the Tribunal 
                         for Artists of the Denazification 
                         Commission. You understand that?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I have already been cleared by a 
                         Denazification Tribunal in Austria.

                                     STEVE
                         What they do in Austria doesn't 
                         interest me one little bit. Okay?  
                         I have your questionnaire here,
                              (reading)
                         Gustav Heinrich Ernst Martin Wilhelm 
                         Furtw�ngler, born Berlin, January 
                         1886. Orchestral conductor. And 
                         you say here you were never a member 
                         of the Nazi Party.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         That is correct.

               A very long silence. When the silence is unbearable Steve 
               speaks.

                                     STEVE
                         Could you tell us about being made 
                         a Prussian Privy Councillor. How 
                         did that happen to a non-Party 
                         member?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I received a telegram from Hermann 
                         Goering informing me that he had 
                         made me a Privy Councillor. I was 
                         not given the opportunity either 
                         to accept or refuse. After the 
                         dreadful events of November 1938, 
                         the violent attacks on the Jews, I 
                         stopped using the title.

                                     STEVE
                         What about Vice-President of the 
                         Chamber of Music, you used that 
                         title didn't you? But then I suppose 
                         you had no choice there either, 
                         because I suppose Dr. Goebbels 
                         just sent you a telegram saying, 
                         Dear Mr. Vice-President.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I don't think Dr. Goebbels sent me 
                         a telegram. I was simply told. In 
                         a letter, I believe. I don't 
                         remember exactly.

                                     STEVE
                         Goebbels and Goering were sure 
                         heaping honours on you. One makes 
                         you a Privy Councillor, the other 
                         makes you Vice-President of the 
                         Chamber of Music, and you weren't 
                         even a member of the Party, how do 
                         you explain that?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Well, there was a constant battle 
                         between Goering and Goebbels as to 
                         which of them would control German 
                         culture. I was simply a pawn.  
                         Anyway, I resigned from the 
                         Musikkammer at the same time I 
                         resigned as Musical Director of 
                         the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. 
                         In 1934.

               David puts up a hand. Steve nods.

                                     DAVID
                         Why was that? Why did you resign, 
                         Dr. Furtw�ngler?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I wrote an open letter to the 
                         newspapers condemning what they 
                         were doing to music, making these 
                         distinctions between Jews and non-
                         Jews. For my part, the only divide 
                         in art is between good and bad. 
                         Eventually, Goebbels summoned me 
                         and told me I could leave the 
                         country if I wanted to but under 
                         no condition would I ever be allowed 
                         to return. I always believe that 
                         you have to fight from the inside 
                         not from without. I asked myself, 
                         what's the duty of an artist, to 
                         stay or to leave? And then Goebbels 
                         demanded that I acknowledge Hitler 
                         as solely responsible for cultural 
                         policy. Well, that was a fact and 
                         it seemed pointless to deny it. I 
                         simply acknowledged that Hitler 
                         and the Minister of Culture 
                         appointed by him were solely 
                         responsible for the cultural policy 
                         of the Reich. What I wanted to 
                         express was that I, personally, 
                         had no responsibility whatsoever 
                         for their cultural policy. I have 
                         always had the view that art and 
                         politics should... should have 
                         nothing to do with each other.

                                     STEVE
                         Then why did you conduct at one of 
                         their Nuremberg rallies?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                              (flaring)
                         I did not conduct at at the rally, 
                         I conducted on the evening before 
                         the rally.

                                     STEVE
                         That sounds like the small print 
                         in one of our insurance policies, 
                         Wilhelm. And what about April 19, 
                         1942?  The eve of Hitler's fifty-
                         third birthday, the big celebration; 
                         you conducted for Hitler, didn't 
                         you? Was that in keeping with your 
                         view that art and politics have 
                         nothing to do with each other?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                              (flustered)
                         That... that was a different matter, 
                         I... I was tricked.

                                     STEVE
                         How come?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Could I have a glass of water, 
                         please? Please, Fraulein?

                                     EMMI
                         Straube.

               Steve looks expectant but Furtw�ngler remains silent. Steve 
               nods to Emmi, who gets the water.  Furtw�ngler drinks. 
               Steve waits.

                                     FURTW�ANGLER
                         Thank you. I was in Vienna, 
                         rehearsing the Ninth Symphony of 
                         Beethoven, when Goebbels called 
                         and said I had to conduct at 
                         Hitler's birthday. I'd always 
                         managed to wriggle out of such 
                         invitations, pleading previous 
                         engagements, illness, having my 
                         doctors state I was not well and 
                         so on and so on. I was also 
                         fortunate that Baldur von Shirach, 
                         who controlled Vienna, hated Dr. 
                         Goebbels and would do anything to 
                         thwart his wishes. But this time 
                         Goebbels got to my doctors before 
                         me; they were frightened off, and 
                         von Schirach was threatened, bullied 
                         and gave in. So, I had no 
                         alternative but to conduct for 
                         Hitler. Believe me, I knew I had 
                         compromised, and I deeply regret 
                         it.

                                     STEVE
                              (playing with him)
                         Doesn't sound much of a trick to 
                         me. Sounds like you made a deal.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I made no deal!

                                     STEVE
                         I don't buy that.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         It's the truth.

               Silence. Steve paces. Then suddenly turns on Furtw�ngler.

                                     STEVE
                         I keep hearing you helped a lot of 
                         Jews to escape. How did you do 
                         that?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I don't remember in detail, there 
                         were so many.

                                     STEVE
                         Did you call someone you knew?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I may have, as... as I said, I 
                         simply don't remember.

                                     STEVE
                         Let me me help you, then. You picked 
                         up the phone and made a call -
                              (Mimes a telephone.)
                         'Hello, Adolf? Wilhelm speaking. 
                         Listen, old pal, there's a Jew-boy 
                         musician I want you to help. He 
                         needs a permit to get to Paris.'

               Emmi sticks her fingers in her ears and shuts her eyes 
               tight.

                                     STEVE
                         Or maybe you called Goebbels or 
                         Goering? You were so close you 
                         were in the same shithouse as them.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         May I ask a question?

                                     STEVE
                         Sure.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         When will my case be heard by the 
                         Tribunal?

                                     STEVE
                         Your guess is as good as mine.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I need to work. I need to make my 
                         living. I live off the generosity 
                         of friends...

                                     STEVE
                         Tough, tough!

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                              (now more and more 
                              agitated)
                         Then why is it, please, that another 
                         conductor who was actually a member 
                         of the Party, who used to play the 
                         Horst Wessel before his concerts, 
                         has already been cleared and is 
                         working again while I have to wait 
                         and wait and wait?

                                     STEVE
                         I don't know, he wasn't my case. 
                         Why did you escape to Switzerland 
                         just before the war ended?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         It was because I learned that the 
                         Gestapo was about to arrest me.

                                     STEVE
                         Why were they going to arrest you?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I believe it was because of another 
                         letter I'd written to Goebbels 
                         lamenting the decline of musical 
                         standards due to racial policies.

                                     STEVE
                         You didn't complain about the racial 
                         policies, just about the musical 
                         standards, is that right?

               No response.

                                     STEVE
                         So, how did you learn that the 
                         Gestapo was out to get you?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         During an enforced hour-long 
                         interval because of a power failure 
                         at a concert here in Berlin, Albert 
                         Speer, the Minister of Armaments, 
                         said to me, 'You look very tired 
                         Dr. Furtw�ngler, you should go 
                         abroad for a while.' I knew exactly 
                         what he meant.

                                     STEVE
                         You sure knew a lot of people in 
                         high places.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         It would be truer to say, I think, 
                         that a lot of people in high places 
                         knew me.

                                     STEVE
                         You were real close to all of them, 
                         to Adolf, to Hermann, to Joseph, 
                         to Baldur, and now Albert,
                              (flaring)
                         So, let's hear the truth, let's 
                         come clean. What was your Party 
                         number?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         If you are going to bully me like 
                         this, Major, you had better do 
                         your homework. You obviously have 
                         no idea how impertinent and stupid 
                         your questions are.

               Steve is stung. His eyes narrow dangerously.

                                     STEVE
                         David, you remember I said I had a 
                         question that he wouldn't be able 
                         to answer? Well, I'm gonna ask it 
                         now.  You ready for this, Wilhelm? 
                         It's a tough one. Why didn't you 
                         get out right at the start when 
                         Hitler came to power in 1933? Why 
                         didn't you leave Germany?

               No response.

                                     STEVE
                         I have a list of names here, people 
                         in your profession, who got out in 
                         '33. Bruno Walter, Otto Klemperer, 
                         Arnold Schoenberg, Max Reinhardt...

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         They were Jews, they had to leave. 
                         They were right to leave.
                              (He breathes deeply, 
                              summons strength.)
                         I could not leave my country in 
                         her deepest misery. After all, I 
                         am a German.  I... I stayed in my 
                         homeland. Is that my sin in your 
                         eyes?

                                     STEVE
                         See, David? He can't answer the 
                         question. I'll ask it again, 
                         Wilhelm, and don't give me any 
                         more airy-fairy, intellectual 
                         bullshit!

               The telephone rings. No one moves. Then Emmi picks up the 
               telephone.

                                     EMMI
                         Major Arnold's office. Yes, he is.

               Offers the phone to David.

                                     EMMI
                         It's Major Richards for Lieutenant 
                         Wills.

               David takes the telephone.

                                     DAVID
                         David Wills. Yes, sir.
                              (listens.)
                         Well, you want me to tell him? 
                         Okay,
                              (to Steve)
                         Major Richards wants a word with 
                         you, sir.

               Steve indicates he'll take the call on the extension.  
               Furtw�ngler stands. As Steve crosses to the extension:

                                     STEVE
                              (muttering)
                         Why can't he just ask for me? Why 
                         does he have to ask for you first? 
                         Goddamn British, so correct!

               He picks up the extension. Emmi puts down her receiver.

                                     STEVE
                         Steve Arnold...

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I've had enough of this, I'm 
                         leaving.

               He goes quickly. David dashes after him.

               INT. WAITING ROOM - DAY Furtw�ngler is at the door when 
               David reaches him.

                                     DAVID
                         Dr. Furtw�ngler!  Dr. Furtw�ngler! 
                         Please, please...
                              (a warning)
                         Don't. It's not advisable.

               The sound of Steve laughing with delight.  Furtw�ngler 
               hesitates. 

               Emmi comes to the waiting-room door, watches, as if on 
               guard.

               David comes round to face Furtw�ngler.

                                     DAVID
                              (he gathers courage)
                         When I was a child, my father, he 
                         took me to... he took me to one of 
                         your concerts. I remember you 
                         conducted Beethoven's Fifth 
                         Symphony. I was deeply moved. And 
                         I've loved music ever since. I was 
                         grateful to you. And I've admired 
                         you. How could you... how could 
                         you serve those criminals?

               He falls silent.

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - DAY

               Emmi, at the open door, has been listening. She's shocked, 
               turns away to see Steve, on the extension, chuckling, 
               grinning from ear to ear.  

                                     STEVE
                         How many?  Jesus, that's dynamite!
                         Okay.

               INT. WAITING ROOM - DAY

               David and Furtw�ngler haven't moved. Both are looking 
               towards Steve's office and Emmi in the doorway.

               Again the sound of Steve's laugh. Then Emmi steps into the 
               room, approaches Furtw�ngler.

                                     EMMI
                         Dr. Furtw�ngler.

               He gives her a wonderful smile.  And, suddenly, Steve stands 
               in the doorway, smiling.

                                     STEVE
                         Well now. Aren't we all sociable?

               The others are made awkward.

                                     STEVE
                         I've got to hand it to the British, 
                         David. You know what those guys 
                         are?  Decent.
                              (He sits, crosses 
                              his legs.)
                         Tell me, Herr Dr. Furtw�ngler, do 
                         you know Hans Hinkel?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Yes, a despicable human being. He 
                         was in the Ministry of Culture. 
                         His job was to get rid of Jews in 
                         the arts.

                                     STEVE
                         Yup, that's him, that's the guy. 
                         You know what else the little creep 
                         did? He kept files, close on 250,000 
                         files. And you know what's in those 
                         files?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Certainly not, but I knew he had 
                         informers everywhere. Even in my 
                         orchestra there was someone

                                     STEVE
                         Who?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I wasn't told. I just knew it.

                                     STEVE
                         How?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                              (uneasy)
                         I was warned. 

                                     STEVE
                         Who warned you? 

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                              (lowering his head)
                         Goering. Because Hinkel was working 
                         for Goebbels.

                                     STEVE
                         What did Goering say?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         He told me to be careful as one of 
                         Goebbels' men was watching me. He 
                         read a report on me - everything I 
                         said was quoted word by word.

                                     STEVE
                         Oh boy, you're gonna love this. 
                         Take your time with this now. Those 
                         files contain the details of every 
                         working artist in this country. 
                         Those files are gonna tell us who 
                         joined the Party, who informed and 
                         who was helpful.

               Furtw�ngler goes to the door. David opens it for him. 
               Furtw�ngler nods, then turns to Emmi, bows to her and 
               smiles. He goes.

               INT. BRITISH INTELLIGENCE HQ, ARCHIVE ROOM - DAY

                                     SECURITY
                         Your name, please.

                                     DAVID
                         David Wills.

                                     SECURITY
                         Over there.

               There is a long trestle table running the length of the 
               room, with chairs, as if in a library. A notice requests 
               'Silence'.

               British and American servicemen, a Russian and a French 
               officer studying papers, making notes. At the furthest 
               end, Steve, David and Emmi.

                                     STEVE
                         Fantastic! The only condition is 
                         we have to do the work here. I 
                         want you to collect all the files 
                         on the boys in the band.

               INT. BRITISH INTELLIGENCE HQ, ARCHIVE ROOM - NIGHT

               David discovers that the archive room was originally a 
               synagogue. He is moved. He lays stones on the rail of what 
               was once the ark.

               INT. BRITISH INTELLIGENCE HQ, ARCHIVE ROOM - DAY

               Emmi and David surrounded by files, sifting through, making 
               notes. They examine the Hinkel Archive.

               INT. BRITISH INTELLIGENCE HQ, ARCHIVE ROOM - DAY

               Another day.

               Sunshine pouring in. Steve seated as before, but Emmi and 
               David again in different places.

               Emmi rises, goes to Steve, shows him something.

                                     EMMI
                         Maybe you can have a look at this.

               He reads. He is not pleased. He writes furiously. Emmi 
               returns to her place. Suddenly, a movement causes Steve to 
               look up.

               STEVE AND HIS POV: David slides a note across to Emmi. 
               Emmi reads the note. David watches her. She looks at him. 
               She almost smiles, nods surreptitiously.

                                     DAVID
                              (a whisper)
                         Schubert.

               She feels Steve's eyes on her, and returns quickly to her 
               work.

               Steve is displeased and even more suspicious.

               EXT. PARTLY RUINED CHURCH - EVENING

               Summer evening. The first movement of Schubert's String 
               Quintet in C Major, D956, played by three men and two women 
               to a large audience packed into the ruins, partly open to 
               the sky, Dymshitz  among them.

               At the rear of the church, Emmi and David, enraptured, 
               seated side by side.

               The first movement ends and the Adagio begins. After the 
               music gathers momentum:

               Rain. Thunder and lightning. The musicians continue to 
               play, unperturbed.  They are coming to the end of the 
               Quintet.

               David and Emmi huddled together. Some umbrellas up and 
               then movement which catches David's attention. He nudges 
               Emmi, I indicates with his chin.

               People have moved to reveal Furtw�ngler: seated, wearing a 
               hat, still I' as a statue, soaked, listening, 
               expressionless.

               Much applause. The musicians bow. The audience start to 
               leave.

               Emmi and David emerge from the ruins.  Furtw�ngler passes 
               them.

               They nod awkwardly. He doesn't respond but is about to 
               walk on when Dymshitz pushes through, nods to David, who 
               salutes. Dymshitz catches up with Furtw�ngler. They are 
               near to Emmi and David.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         Dr. Furtw�ngler -

               Furtw�ngler stops.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         Moving, you agree? Whenever I hear 
                         Schubert I am moved.  You agree?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         The tempi were a little too correct 
                         for my taste. But I expect that is 
                         because of the rain.

               He nods politely, is about to go -

                                     DYMSHITZ
                              (also for David's 
                              benefit)
                         Wait, Doctor, I understand you 
                         have difficulties with the 
                         Americans. I want you to know, I 
                         am your champion. We can help.

               Furtw�ngler allows himself a faint smile, tips his hat, 
               and then hurries off into the night. Dymshitz goes, too.  
               David and Emmi watch them.  Then:

                                     EMMI
                              (frowning, worried)
                         What does he mean, too correct?

                                     DAVID
                         I don't know.

               Huddled under their umbrella, they dash off.

               INT. STEVE'S BEDROOM, GRAND HOTEL - NIGHT

               Steve, fully dressed, lies on the bed in his small, shabby 
               room, staring into space. He is suddenly startled by a 
               loud roll of thunder and then a fierce crack of lightning.  

               He goes to the window, watching the rain. He stands 
               motionless for a second, then makes a decision. He grabs 
               his cap, a raincoat from the back of the door. Another 
               loud thunderclap.

               INT. US OFFICERS' CLUB - NIGHT

               Dancers jitterbugging and jiving. Among them, David and 
               Emmi also dancing, imitating the others and having a good 
               time. The music ends. Scattered applause. The band leaves 
               the platform. The dancers return to tables or the bar.  

               Later:

               David and Emmi at their table, eating. She eats voraciously, 
               eyes glazed, all her concentration on the food in front of 
               her. David is fascinated, can't stop watching her.

               Steve enters the club, makes his way to the bar, orders a 
               drink.

               Steve turns to survey the room, almost at once spots David 
               and Emmi, their backs to him. He observes them.

               David and Emmi at their table: They have finished their 
               meal. Emmi is silent now, staring at her empty plate. 

               Steve is suddenly at their table.

                                     STEVE
                         Well, what is this, the office 
                         party?  

               David and Emmi are frozen with embarrassment.

                                     STEVE
                         May I join you?
                              (sits down, beams.)
                         So, what have you two been up to 
                         tonight? Hey. Don't I owe you a 
                         bottle of French champagne?  

               Tries to get a waiter's attention but fails. . No response.

                                     STEVE
                         You know, David, you're a lucky 
                         guy. I invited Emmi here but she 
                         turned me down. You must've hidden 
                         depths, David...

               he band starts to play; he stands, holds out a hand.

                                     STEVE
                         C'mon, Emmi, let's dance. I'll 
                         teach you how to jive.

               She is horribly embarrassed, doesn't move. David suddenly 
               stands and takes Emmi by the arm.

                                     DAVID
                         I'm very sorry, Major, but I 
                         promised her mother, we have to 
                         go.

               They leave quickly.

               Steve watches them. He sinks down, angry and jealous.

               INT. HALL, STAIRWAY, STRAUBE APARTMENT BLOCK - NIGHT

               David and Emmi enter the hall, each locked in their own 
               thoughts.  They reach the foot of the stairs and pause.  
               They want to kiss but both are too awkward. She starts up 
               the stairs.

                                     EMMI
                         Don't see me to my door, there's 
                         no need.

                                     DAVID
                         But I promised your mother.

               She stops, turns.

                                     EMMI
                         Well, sleep well.

               She continues on her way.

               INT. ARCHIVE ROOM - DAY

               Steve and Emmi at work on the files. One or two BRITISH 
               OFFICERS present, and David, who is working at the far end 
               of the table. He has a cold.

               Emmi, who also has a cold, opens a file and is immediately 
               alert. She reads. She blows her nose. She is uncertain. 
               She looks up at Steve. She makes a decision. She rises, 
               takes the file to Steve.

                                     EMMI
                         Excuse me, Major. I found this on 
                         Helmuth Rode. You remember? The 
                         second violinist? Look, he's 
                         Austrian not German. But it's this 
                         that's more important, I think...

               She points to something. Steve laughs loudly.

                                     AN OFFICER
                         Sssh!

               David looks up at them, puzzled. Then a British SERGEANT 
               comes into the doorway.

                                     SERGEANT
                         Lieutenant Wills, telephone -

               David rises and as he goes:

                                     THE OFFICER
                              (exasperated)
                         What is this, a railway station?

               INT. LOBBY, ARCHIVE BUILDING - DAY 

               In a booth near the front desk, David is on the telephone.

                                     DAVID
                              (into telephone)
                         David. Wills. Hello? Who? Who in 
                         Wiesbaden?

                 Irritated, he taps the receiver but the line's gone dead.

               EXT. LAKESIDE, BERLIN - DAY

               Steve lies, shirt off, taking the sun. Children playing. 
               Noise behind him of someone in the bushes. Steve doesn't 
               move.

               Rode, carrying a slender leather case, pushes through to 
               Steve, who remains with his eyes closed.

                                     RODE
                         Major.

                                     STEVE
                              (eyes still closed)
                         Helmuth.

                                     RODE
                         Guess what I am holding in my hand. 
                         You like guessing games?

                                     STEVE
                         Love 'em, Helmuth. I give up. What 
                         are you holding in your hand?

               Rode takes from the case a conductor's baton. Steve opens 
               one eye.

                                     RODE
                         It's Dr. Furtw�ngler's baton, which 
                         I stole.

                                     STEVE
                         The one he kept in his right hand.  
                         Yes, you remember.

                                     RODE
                         Yes, you remember.

                                     STEVE
                         How could I forget?

               Sits up, takes the baton. Somewhere a child laughs; suddenly 
               Steve thrusts the baton at Rode.

                                     STEVE
                         Show me.

                                     RODE
                         Show you?

                                     STEVE
                         Yeah, show me, I want to see you 
                         do it. Pretend I'm Adolf. You're 
                         the maestro, and you have the baton 
                         in your right hand, but you give 
                         me the salute just the same.

                                     RODE
                         Not here, Major, there are people, 
                         if anybody should see... please, 
                         please, Major...

                                     STEVE
                         Do it, Helmuth.

               After nervous looks over his shoulder Rode, salutes half-
               heartedly.

                                     STEVE
                         Do it right.

               Rode thrusts his hand out in the Nazi salute. 

               People by the lake:

               Mostly elderly, but some younger ones see Rode saluting. 
               Some turn away. Others stare.

                                     STEVE'S VOICE
                         You look great doing that.

               Rode and Steve:

               Rode looks around nervously, lowers his arm.

                                     STEVE
                         And I see what you mean. You nearly 
                         poked my eyes out.

                                     RODE
                         Exactly.  Replaces the baton, gives 
                         Steve the case.

                                     STEVE
                         Don't worry, Helmuth, it'll be our 
                         secret.

               A ball comes bounding towards them. Steve catches it. Then 
               a BOY runs in, looks hopeful.

                                     BOY
                         Mister, mister, here, here, 
                         mister!!!

               Steve tosses the ball back to him.

                                     STEVE
                         Great catch, kid. The boy runs 
                         off.

                                     RODE
                         So. You wanted to see me.

               Steve pats the spot next to him and Rode sits.

                                     RODE
                         You usually don't work on Sunday, 
                         Major?

                                     STEVE
                         All in the cause of humanity, 
                         Helmuth. Or should I call you one-
                         zero-four-nine-three-three-one?

                                     RODE
                         What?

                                     STEVE
                         One-zero-four-nine-three-three-
                         one. Or d'you mind if I just call 
                         you 'one'?

               Rode makes an attempt to go but Steve grabs him.

                                     STEVE
                         You know what I say you are, 
                         Helmuth? I say you're a piece of 
                         shit.

               Rode suddenly starts to retch.

                                     RODE
                         That bastard!

               People by the lakeside:

               Faces turning at Rode's sobs. Impassive. Blank.

               Steve and Rode:

                                     STEVE
                         Who's the bastard, Helmuth? Hinkel?

               Rode nods.

                                     STEVE
                         Why? He promised to remove your 
                         file?

               Rode vomits.

                                     STEVE
                         And what about before that? What 
                         were you a member of in Austria?

               After a moment:

                                     STEVE
                         Was a member of...?  Speak up?

                                     RODE
                         (barely audible)
                         I was a member of the Communist 
                         Party. I was a communist. That's 
                         what Hinkel had over me. He knew 
                         everything. He held that over me. 
                         That's how he made me co-operate.

                                     STEVE
                         Oh, I see, he made you co-operate. 
                         And now are you a communist again?

                                     RODE
                              (angry)
                         You don't know what it's like to 
                         wake up every single morning of 
                         your life terrified, you don't 
                         know that -
                              (he stops.)

               Brief silence. Steve stands.

               Further along the lakeside:

               Steve and Rode walk. People about. Boats on the lake.

                                     RODE
                         I would never, in my wildest dreams, 
                         have ever been a second violinist 
                         in the Berlin Philharmonic. When 
                         they got rid of the... the Jews in 
                         the orchestra, it gave people like 
                         me a chance.

               EXT. LAKE - DAY

               Rode rowing Steve in a small boat. Rode, exhausted, stops. 
               The boat drifts. Steve watches him for a moment, then:

                                     STEVE
                         Helmuth, you ever heard of plea-
                         bargaining?

               Rode, trying to catch his breath, shakes his head.

                                     STEVE
                         Talk about power, I have the power 
                         to give you work, make your life 
                         easier. Your past won't be 
                         mentioned. I could give you a job 
                         tomorrow but I have to get something 
                         in return. See, Helmuth? That's 
                         plea-bargaining.

               No response. Rode keeps his head bowed.

                                     STEVE
                         I can give you freedom of movement, 
                         freedom to work, freedom, Helmuth. 
                         But I need something in return.

                                     RODE
                         Major, we're discussing a man of 
                         genius, I don't want...

                                     STEVE
                         Fuck that, Helmuth. You want to 
                         discuss symbols here?  This guy 
                         was a front man. He was the piper, 
                         but he played their tune, you get 
                         my philosophical meaning?  I'm not 
                         interested in small fish, I'm after 
                         Moby Dick. Come on, Helmuth. Hard 
                         facts.

               Silence. Then Rode slowly raises his head.

                                     RODE
                         The only thing I know is he's an 
                         anti-Semite.

                                     STEVE
                         Of course. You, too. Like everyone 
                         else in this goddamn country.

               EXT. WOOD, LAKESIDE - DAY

               Rode and Steve walking. Rode suddenly turns to him:

                                     RODE
                         I've remembered something else...

                                     STEVE
                         Yeah?

                                     RODE
                         Furtw�ngler sent Hitler a telegram 
                         for his birthday.

                                     STEVE
                         He did?

                                     RODE
                         One of your people told me.

                                     STEVE
                         One of my people? 

               They start to walk away from the water.

                                     RODE
                         Yes. A corporal. US Army. A Jew. 
                         He said he'd seen the telegram in 
                         the Chancellery.

                                     STEVE
                         Son-of-a-gun. We'll find the 
                         corporal and we'll find the 
                         telegram.

               He stops, takes out a cigarette, offers one to Rode, lights 
               them both, gives Rode the packet.  They smoke for a moment.

                                     STEVE
                         But I need documentary proof. You 
                         know of anything like that?

                                     RODE
                         No. But that's why we hated him. 
                         We admired him as a conductor but 
                         we all hated him too because he 
                         didn't have to join the Party and 
                         yet he had a better life than any 
                         of us. He didn't have to go and 
                         deliver a report after every trip 
                         abroad. He got everything from 
                         them, everything. He was filthier 
                         than any of us Party members.

               The sun is setting. Rode stops suddenly.

                                     RODE
                         There's a rumour... I don't know 
                         if it's true or not... but ask him 
                         about von der Null.

                                     STEVE
                         Never heard of him, who is he?

                                     RODE
                         Edwin von der Null. Music critic. 
                         He gave Furtw�ngler terrible reviews 
                         while he raved about Herbert von 
                         Karajan.

                                     STEVE
                         Who's he?

                                     RODE
                         Also a conductor. Very brilliant. 
                         Young. Von der Null called him 
                         'The Miracle von Karajan'.  
                         Furtw�ngler was outraged and they 
                         say he had von der Null conscripted 
                         into the army. The same thing 
                         happened to another critic. True 
                         or not, it's not such a bad idea.  
                         Critics give you bad reviews, you 
                         have them sent to the Russian front.
                              (Chuckks.)
                         But if you really want to get 
                         Furtw�ngler, ask him about Herbert 
                         von Karajan.

                                     STEVE
                         The Miracle Kid.

                                     RODE
                         Yes, yes you may notice that he 
                         cannot even bring himself to utter 
                         his name, he... he refers to him 
                         as K.

               Rode tries to make up his mind about something, then 
               decides. He reaches into an inside pocket and takes out a 
               small black notebook.

                                     RODE
                         And ask him about his private life.

                                     STEVE
                         His private life?

               Rode hesitates, then he hands Steve the black book.

                                     RODE
                         Yes, it's all in here. His women.

               INT. ARCHIVE ROOM - DAY

               Steve going along the shelves filled with files. He's at 
               the H, then I, then J. He stops at the letter K. With his 
               forefinger, he runs down the files. He stops, pulls out a 
               fat file: 

                                    'KARAJAN,H.VON' 

               He opens the file.  

               INSERT: - the file:

               ID PHOTOGRAPHS of an energetic-looking young man and two 
               Nazi Party membership booklets.

               INT. CAFETERIA - DAY

               David makes his way from the counter. He carries a tray 
               with two cups of coffee. He goes to a table where CAPTAIN 
               MARTIN sits, papers and files spread before him. David 
               gives him his coffee, then sits across from him, blows his 
               nose.

               Silence while they sugar and milk their coffee. David aware 
               of Martin's eyes on him. 

                                     MARTIN
                         Where do you stand on all this?

                                     DAVID
                         On all what?

                                     MARTIN
                         On Furtw�ngler.

                                     DAVID
                         I don't know.

               He breaks off.

                                     MARTIN
                         You represent the United States 
                         now. We have a moral duty to be 
                         just and we have to be seen to be 
                         just.

                                     DAVID
                         Major Arnold believes he has a 
                         moral duty, too.

                                     MARTIN
                         Our duty is to help Furtw�ngler 
                         with his defence,
                              (carefully)
                         That's why I want you to look at 
                         this...
                              (he selects papers 
                              from the table.)
                         These are part of the transcripts 
                         of the trial at Nuremberg. We can't 
                         get them translated fast enough. 
                         But I guess you understand German, 
                         right?

               Passes papers across to David.

                                     MARTIN
                         That's the evidence of a guy named 
                         Dahlerus. He's a Swede. Friend of 
                         Hermann Goering. I want you to 
                         study it. And I want you to use 
                         it.

               David tries to sneeze but fails; he starts to read.

                                     MARTIN
                         We're going to find more stuff to 
                         feed you. We'll have some other 
                         suggestions. We need to build a 
                         case for the defence - based not 
                         on feelings, not on prejudice, but 
                         on facts.

               He watches David read. David is engrossed. Almost 
               imperceptibly, he shakes his head.

               EXT. BERLIN STREET - DAY

               A half-ruined caf� with tables on the sidewalk. WERNER, 
               the timpanist, SCHLEE, the oboist, and two others seated 
               at one of the tables, drinking coffee. 

               David carries an attach� case and walks towards the caf�. 
               He scans the people at the tables, sees the musicians and 
               approaches. They stand.

                                     WERNER
                         Lieutenant Wills.

               David nods

                                     WERNER
                         Herr Schlee, timpanist, Herr Romer, 
                         cello and Herr Schmidt, viola. 
                         They are willing to help. We have 
                         already ordered ourselves coffee. 
                         I hope you...

                                     DAVID
                         Yeah, of course.

                                     WERNER
                         The whole orchestra will vouch for 
                         him. He was always there to support 
                         us.

                                     DAVID
                         We need names, if possible with 
                         addresses, because it's urgent. 
                         Names of musicians saved by Dr. 
                         Furtw�ngler, people he helped to 
                         escape abroad. Let's go somewhere 
                         public.

               David leaves money on the table and then walks off with 
               the four men. They talk as they make their way down a side 
               street.

               INT. DYMSHITZ'S VILLA - NIGHT

               Steve and Dymshitz sit opposite each other and clink vodka 
               glasses.  They have been drinking but are not yet drunk.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         To co-operation.

               They drink. Dymshitz pours more vodka.

                                     STEVE
                         I was in Vienna. I had with me an 
                         Austrian chauffeur, Max his name 
                         was, he spent time in the camps. 
                         We were looking at these Viennese 
                         cleaning up the bomb damage, 
                         scavenging for rotting food, butt 
                         ends, anything. I said, 'To think 
                         a million of these people came out 
                         to welcome Adolf on the day he 
                         entered the city, a million of 
                         'em, and now look at 'em.'  And 
                         Max said, 'Oh, not these people, 
                         Major. These people were all at 
                         home hiding Jews in their attics.' 
                         You get the point, Colonel? The 
                         point is they're all full of shit.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         Furtw�ngler's in a different 
                         category.

                                     STEVE
                         We're dealing with degenerates 
                         here.

               He is still for a moment, then grabs the bottle and pours 
               himself a drink, downs it. Dymshitz watches him, then:

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         Degenerates?

               INT. ANOTHER ROOM, DYMSHITZ'S OFFICE SUITE - NIGHT

               German modern paintings stacked untidily.

               Dymshitz, carrying a vodka bottle and his glass, shows 
               Steve the paintings. Steve, too, has a glass.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         A great artist will have great 
                         privileges in a Russian zone.

                                     STEVE
                         That's why he didn't get the hell 
                         out of here when he had the chance! 
                         I put that to him, he couldn't 
                         answer. Why didn't he go and direct 
                         in America, like that Italian, 
                         Toscanini.

               Dymshitz pours vodkas, raises his glass, drinks. So does 
               Steve. Now, their moods swing with the drink.

               Dymshitz drinks; then sits, sinks into his own world.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                              (lost for a moment)
                         Perhaps... perhaps he believed he 
                         could at least try to preserve 
                         something important, things like 
                         an orchestra, a school. That's his 
                         country. Maybe he has an old mother 
                         who can't be left alone. Maybe he 
                         has brothers, sisters... you 
                         can't...

               A forlorn look at Steve. His eyes are misty, he is visibly 
               drunk.

                                     STEVE
                              (a wry smile)
                         Colonel. He had no sisters, no 
                         brothers, only a lot of love 
                         affairs.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         Anyway, Major, why should he leave 
                         his country, his mother tongue, 
                         his family, his history, his past, 
                         his future, just because now, 
                         suddenly, there is a dictatorship? 
                         Why?

                                     STEVE
                         But what... before that turns 
                         rotten...  What if they surround 
                         the space with barbed wire, Colonel?

                                     DYMSHITZ
                              (suddenly exploding)
                         Don't talk about things you know 
                         nothing about. He was in a 
                         dictatorship!

                                     STEVE
                         (dismissive)
                         Yeah, yeah, art and politics, yeah, 
                         yeah, I heard all about that.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                              (angry)
                         In a dictatorship, art belongs to 
                         the Party. If you want to be a 
                         conductor, you have to have an 
                         orchestra. And you can only get an 
                         orchestra if you have contact with 
                         the power. All over the world you 
                         need the right contacts and you 
                         have to make the right compromises.

                                     STEVE
                         This is what I'm saying. He must 
                         have had Party contacts.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         There are good Party members who 
                         help, and there are dirty non-Party 
                         members who inform on you. Of 
                         course, they gave him privileges.

               Pause.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         And suddenly, Steve, suddenly you 
                         notice that they like you. They 
                         honour you, suddenly you are the 
                         director of the best museum in the 
                         world, for example.

                                     STEVE
                         What museum?

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         I'm sorry. Museum? Not... I said 
                         orchestra. Sorry. Believe me.
                              (another sudden 
                              change of mood to 
                              earnest, intimate)
                         Help me, Steve. You say you answer 
                         for someone from high up. I, too, 
                         have orders from high up. Very 
                         high up. We want Furtw�ngler. I'll 
                         give you in return the whole 
                         orchestra, four, five conductors. 
                         I need him, Steve.

                                     STEVE
                         No can do.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         Let Furtw�ngler go. Please.

                                     STEVE
                         I have a duty.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                              (flaring)
                         Duty? I am sorry, duty? Duty fucking 
                         duty. Trouble is, you Americans 
                         want everybody to live like you. 
                         We liberated Berlin, Major Steve, 
                         not you. Our duty also is to bring 
                         back the best of German culture.

               Dymshitz bursts out laughing.

               Stung, Steve advances on him, almost as if he's about to 
               attack him physically. He stops, sways a little, then, 
               after a moment, drops down in a chair near to Dymshitz. 
               They drink. Intimate:

                                     STEVE
                         I'm gonna get that fucking 
                         bandleader, Colonel. No deal. No 
                         fucking deal.

                                     DYMSHITZ
                         Then you're going to kill me.

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - NIGHT

               Drunk, Steve is clumsily, almost frantically, threading 
               film into the 16-mm projector.

               He switches off the lights then stumbles back to the 
               projector, turns it on and directs its beam towards a blank 
               square of watt.

               It's an American military propaganda film.

                                     ARCHIVES
                         You'll see ruins, you'll see 
                         flowers, you'll see some mighty 
                         pretty scenery, don't let it fool 
                         you. You are in enemy country. The 
                         Nazi party may be gone, but Nazi 
                         thinking, Nazi training and Nazi 
                         trickery remain. Somewhere in this 
                         Germany are two million ex-Nazi 
                         officials. Out of power but still 
                         in there and thinking, thinking 
                         about next time. Remember that 
                         only yesterday every business, 
                         every profession was part of 
                         Hitler's system. Practically every 
                         German was part of the Nazi network. 
                         They believed they were born to be 
                         masters. Don't argue with them. 
                         You are not being sent Germany as 
                         educators. You're a soldier on 
                         guard. You will observe their local 
                         laws, respect their costumes and 
                         religion and you will respect their 
                         property rights. You will not be 
                         friendly. You will be aloof, 
                         watchful and suspicious.

               Steve, swaying slightly, watches, with the film continuing.

               EXT.  FLEA MARKET - DAY

               Bright summer's day. Emmi pushing her way through the 
               crowded market. She comes to the stall with gramophone 
               records.

               David is with her, staying behind a little so as not to 
               disturb her.

               She starts to look through the records, blowing her nose 
               from time to time. Then she finds a box of records, opens 
               it, is delighted. She bargains with the stallholder, and 
               she hands over money. 

               She shows her purchase to David happily. They struggle on 
               in the crowd. David suddenly stops. He has spotted a tandem. 
               The bicycle with two seats is old and rusty but seems to 
               be in working order. David steps up to it, touches it.

               EXT. WOODLAND - DAY

               Two persons, Emmi and David, riding the tandem. Emmi in 
               the front, pedalling, David behind. The road going up into 
               the hills is full of potholes. They change seats. David is 
               in the front, Emmi at the back. Suddenly the road begins 
               to descend. They change again, Emmi sits in the front, 
               David at the back. They speed down the hill.

               INT. BURNT-OUT DEPARTMENT STORE - DAY

               The tandem, ridden by Emmi and David, rolls into a huge 
               building, black and burnt out.

               In the middle of the vast hall, surrounded by the staircase, 
               there is a Christmas tree, almost burnt to cinder. Emmi 
               and David stare at it, mesmerised.

                                     DAVID
                         Yesterday I read that Furtw�ngler 
                         was asked to lead the New York 
                         Philharmonic back in '36, Toscanini 
                         suggested it. Had he accepted, he 
                         would have become the most 
                         celebrated conductor in America.

                                     EMMI
                         When he made his decision, he 
                         couldn't have known everything. 
                         Especially not the way people like 
                         you do, who've returned from exile 
                         and feel that you have a right to 
                         pass judgement. Because you are 
                         blameless, you think you know best 
                         who is a sinner and who deserves 
                         forgiveness. But you have no idea 
                         how people lived here.

                                     DAVID
                         When he met Hitler at his birthday 
                         and shook hands with him, was he 
                         pleased?

                                     EMMI
                         I don't know. But you and I already 
                         know that he has saved lives.

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - DAY

               Steve and David studying files in silence.  Furtw�ngler's 
               baton is on Steve's desk. Steve drinks black coffee.

               Emmi enters.  Curt nods of greeting. She goes to her desk, 
               then takes the Bruckner record to Steve. Steve looks at 
               the record, then glances up at Emmi. He does his best to 
               exclude David, who tries to hear what is said.

               Emmi glances at David. She's embarrassed.

                                     EMMI
                         Bruckner's Seventh, Major.

                                     STEVE
                         Do you know where the Adagio begins?

                                     EMMI
                         Of course.

                                     STEVE
                         Put it on ready to play, and I'll 
                         tell you when to play it.

               He returns to his desk. Emmi looks through the album for 
               the appropriate record.

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - DAY

               Steve by the open window, looking at his wristwatch, smoking 
               a cigarette. David and Emmi both watch him.  The door opens 
               and Furtw�ngler bursts in.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         It is now nine o'clock precisely. 
                         I do not intend to be kept waiting 
                         again.

                                     STEVE
                              (dangerously calm)
                         Don't talk to me like I was a second 
                         violinist. Go back into the waiting 
                         room. Miss Straube will come and 
                         get you when I am ready to see 
                         you.

               Furtw�ngler goes out.

                                     STEVE
                         Jesus God, who the hell does he 
                         think he is? Who the hell does he 
                         think he is?

               David and Emmi gaze at him as he tries to regain control.

               INT. WAITING ROOM - DAY

               The door to the landing is open and Rode is there pretending 
               to sweep. He looks in to see Furtw�ngler sitting, holding 
               his handkerchief over his nose and mouth.

                                     RODE
                         Would you perhaps like to have a 
                         glass of water, Herr Professor?

               Furtw�ngler doesn't seem to hear. Rode hesitates, then 
               continues to sweep.

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - DAY

               David and Emmi look at him, puzzled.

               She goes to the door, opens it, nods. Rode quickly 
               disappears.  Furtw�ngler looks at Emmi.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         What is this man doing here?

               Emmi doesn't answer. All eyes on the door.  Furtw�ngler 
               enters.

                                     STEVE
                         Dr. Furtw�ngler!  Come in, come 
                         in, sit down.

               Furtw�ngler, deeply suspicious, goes for the uncomfortable 
               chair.

                                     STEVE
                         No, no, take this one, it's more 
                         comfortable

               He holds the other chair for Furtw�ngler, who sits.

                                     STEVE
                         If it's too hot, open your tie.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         (interrupting)
                         I wish to say something.

                                     STEVE
                         Go ahead, be my guest.

               Furtw�ngler takes from his pocket a piece of paper with 
               notes. He blows his nose. The room is warming up. It will 
               become like an airless court room, a pressure cooker.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         When I last saw you, I was 
                         unprepared. I did not know what to 
                         expect. In these past weeks, I 
                         have been thinking more carefully 
                         and making some notes.
                              (glances at the 
                              notes.)
                         You have to understand who I am 
                         and what I am. I am a musician and 
                         I believe in music. I am an artist 
                         and I believe in art. Art in 
                         general, and music, in particular, 
                         has for me mystical powers which 
                         nurture man's spiritual needs. I 
                         must confess, however, to being 
                         extremely naive.  I insisted for 
                         many years on the absolute 
                         separation of art and politics. My 
                         entire life was devoted to music 
                         because, and this is very important, 
                         because I thought that I could, 
                         through music, do something 
                         practical.

                                     STEVE
                         And what was that?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Maintain liberty, humanity and 
                         justice.

                                     STEVE
                         Gee, that's a thing of beauty, 
                         honest to God, a real thing of 
                         beauty. I'm going to try to remember 
                         that. Liberty, humanity and justice. 
                         Beautiful. But you used the word 
                         'naive'. Are you now saying you 
                         think you were wrong? That art and 
                         politics can't be separated?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I believe art and politics should 
                         be separate, but that they weren't 
                         kept separate I learned to my cost.

                                     STEVE
                         And when did you first learn that - 
                         when you sent the telegram? Was 
                         that the surrender signal, the 
                         waving of the white flag?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         What telegram?

                                     STEVE
                         'Happy birthday, dear Adolf, love 
                         Wilhelm.' Or words to that effect. 
                         That sounds to me like you were 
                         dropping on your knees and saying, 
                         'Okay, Adolf, you win. You're the 
                         number one man. Have a swell party.'

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I have no idea what you're talking 
                         about.

                                     STEVE
                         The birthday greetings you sent to 
                         your old pal, Adolf Hider.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I never sent him any birthday 
                         greetings or any other kind of 
                         greetings.

                                     STEVE
                         Think carefully, Wilhelm... maybe 
                         not in your own name, but as Privy 
                         Councillor or Vice-President.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I don't have to think carefully. 
                         This is utterly ridiculous.

               David and Emmi exchange the briefest of looks. David raises 
               his hand.

                                     STEVE
                         Yes, David?

                                     DAVID
                         Why not show Dr. Furtw�ngler the 
                         evidence. It may refresh his memory?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         You won't find it because no such 
                         telegram exists.

                                     STEVE
                         Well, I tried, you got to admit I 
                         tried. I thought I might just trap 
                         you there, Wilhelm, but David here 
                         was too quick for me. Smart move, 
                         David, smart move. No, I don't 
                         have the telegram, but I know it 
                         exists. And I want you to know, 
                         Wilhelm, we're going to keep looking 
                         for it because I believe you sent 
                         it.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Then you are wrong.

                                     STEVE
                         Art and politics, yeah, art and 
                         politics. Let's look at that. You 
                         and the Berlin Philharmonic toured 
                         the Third Reich, played in countries 
                         the Nazis had conquered. Are you 
                         saying that conducting in occupied 
                         territories from 1939 on wasn't a 
                         commercial for Adolf and all he 
                         stood for?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         We never, never officially 
                         represented the regime when we 
                         played abroad. We always performed 
                         as a private ensemble. As I think 
                         I already told you, I was a 
                         freelance conductor.

                                     STEVE
                         You know something? You should've 
                         written our insurance policies for 
                         us because you got more exclusion 
                         clauses than Double Indemnity. 
                         What do you imagine people thought? 
                         The Berlin Philharmonic's taken 
                         over by Doctor Goebbels and his 
                         Propaganda Ministry but Wilhelm is 
                         a freelance, so art and politics 
                         are now entirely separate? Is that 
                         what you believed ordinary people 
                         thought?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         have no idea what ordinary people 
                         thought.

                                     STEVE
                         No!

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         No, because I had only one 
                         intention. My only intention 
                         whatever I did was to show that 
                         music means more than politics.

                                     STEVE
                         Tell me about von der Null.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                              (taken off-guard)
                         Von der Null?

                                     STEVE
                         Yes, von der Null.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Von der Null?

                                     STEVE
                         How long's this going to go on, 
                         Wilhelm? I say von der Null, you 
                         say von der Null, I say von der 
                         Null, you say von der Null, we 
                         could go on all day. You know who 
                         von der Null is, don't you? Edwin 
                         von der Nuell, music critic.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Yes, I know who he is.

                                     STEVE
                         Isn't it true that because he gave 
                         you bad reviews and praised this 
                         young guy, Von Karajan, called him 
                         a goddamn miracle, said he was a 
                         better conductor than you, then 
                         you had von der Null conscripted 
                         into the army and no one's heard 
                         from him since?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         That's an outrageous lie!

                                     STEVE
                         You sure you didn't call one of 
                         your close buddies and say, God in 
                         heaven, did you see what that guy 
                         von der Null wrote about me? The 
                         greatest conductor on earth. I 
                         want him out the way. He had the 
                         nerve to accuse me I am not playing 
                         enough modern music. Send him to 
                         Stalingrad. Isn't that what you 
                         did? You don't like criticism, do 
                         you, Wilhelm?  You surely didn't 
                         like them saying there was another 
                         conductor who was better than you... 
                         Are you saying the name von der 
                         Null was never mentioned in your 
                         talks with Goebbels?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                              (uncomfortable)
                         Well. Once he said he'd read what 
                         this man wrote about me.

                                     STEVE
                         And what did he say?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         He said, 'Don't mind him. His job 
                         is to criticise, your job is to 
                         conduct.'

                                     STEVE
                         And what happened to Von der Nul?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I have no idea.

                                     STEVE
                         You've really no idea? I'll tell 
                         you what happened. He died in 
                         Stalingrad.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I'm sorry. 

                                     STEVE
                         Now, that young conductor what's 
                         his name?
                              (playing with 
                              Furtw�ngler)
                         That miracle kid, you know who I 
                         mean. Von Karajan! But you called 
                         him something else. C'mon. What 
                         did you call von Karajan?

               Silence.

                                     STEVE
                         Say it.

               Silence.

                                     STEVE
                         I'll say it, then. 'Little K.' Is 
                         that right? You couldn't even bear 
                         to say his name!

               Furtw�ngler rises angrily and starts to pace.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Please stop playing these games 
                         with me. Why you should bring up 
                         the name of another conductor is 
                         beyond my understanding.

                                     STEVE
                         I'll tell you why. You remember we 
                         talked about you playing for 
                         Hitler's birthday?  And you told 
                         me that Goebbels got to your doctors 
                         first, that you were tricked?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Yes, that's what happened.

               He sits heavily, wipes his brow. He is sweating now.

                                     STEVE
                         I have a different story to tell. 
                         I don't think you were tricked. 
                         Not in the way you describe. I 
                         believe something else happened. 
                         I've seen the Hinkel Archive, I've 
                         seen records of phone calls, and 
                         putting it all together, this is 
                         what I think happened. I think 
                         Goebbels said, 'Wilhelm, if you 
                         won't conduct for Adolf's birthday, 
                         we'll get the Miracle Kid, the guy 
                         that critic, von der Null, thinks 
                         is the greatest conductor in the 
                         world. He's not just willing to 
                         conduct for Adolf, he's offered to 
                         sing "Happy Birthday" as a solo.'

               Silence.

                                     STEVE
                         Come on, admit it. K worried you, 
                         didn't he? He always worried you. 
                         In 1942, he's thirty-four years 
                         old, you're already fifty-six. And 
                         Goebbels and Goering keep saying 
                         to you, 'If you don't do it, little 
                         K will.' Never mind art and politics 
                         and symbols and airy-fairy bullshit 
                         about liberty, humanity and justice 
                         because I don't care how great you 
                         are. It's the oldest story in the 
                         book,
                              (a wry look at David)
                         The ageing Romeo jealous of the 
                         young buck. The real reason you 
                         didn't leave the country when you 
                         knew you should have was that you 
                         were frightened that, once you 
                         were out of the way, you'd be 
                         supplanted by the Miracle Kid, the 
                         Party's boy twice over, flashy, 
                         talented little K.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         This is absolute nonsense!

                                     STEVE
                         Well, I'm just beginning to develop 
                         my theme. Isn't that what you call 
                         it in classical music, developing 
                         your theme? Okay, so they played 
                         on your insecurity. That's human, 
                         understandable. But, there is one 
                         guy who doesn't like little K as 
                         much as he likes you - yeah, the 
                         number one man your old pal, Adolf. 
                         He thinks you're the greatest, and 
                         when he says, I want Wilhelm for 
                         my birthday, boy, they better go 
                         out get Wilhelm. So, Josef calls 
                         and threatens you with little K. 
                         And you said to hell with the Ninth 
                         in Vienna, I'll give it to Adolf 
                         as a birthday present in Berlin. 
                         That's the trick they played, they 
                         got you by the balls and they 
                         squeezed. Hard. Why did you stay? 
                         Why did you play for them? Why 
                         were you the flag-carrier for their 
                         regime?  Jealousy?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                              (interrupting)
                         Of course there was a conspiracy 
                         against me, a campaign - even 
                         abroad.

               Brief silence; all eyes on him.

                                     STEVE
                         You see, Wilhelm, I'm talking about 
                         ordinary, everyday reasons. Which 
                         is why I want to discuss your 
                         private life.  How many illegitimate 
                         children do you have?

                                     DAVID
                         Major, I don't see how this line 
                         of questioning could...

                                     STEVE
                         David, what are you Counsel for 
                         the Defence now? (
                              (to Furtw�ngler)
                         Did you hear the question?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                              (barely audible)
                         I have illegitimate children.

                                     STEVE
                         What?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I said I have illegitimate children. 
                         I don't know how many.

                                     STEVE
                         You like the women, don't you, 
                         Wilhelm?

               No response.

                                     STEVE
                         Isn't it true that before every 
                         concert you got a woman in your 
                         dressing room and gave her the old 
                         conductor's baton, isn't that true?

                                     DAVID
                              (indicating EmmI)
                         Major, this is deeply offensive 
                         and repugnant!

                                     STEVE
                         You bet.

                                     DAVID
                         and totally irrelevant.

                                     STEVE
                              (continuing to 
                              Furtw�ngler)
                         Not so, Counsellor. That secretary 
                         of yours, she wasn't just your 
                         secretary, she procured women for 
                         you, didn't she? As many and as 
                         often as you wanted.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Stop this, please, stop this now!

                                     STEVE
                         No, I'm not going to stop it. Hitler 
                         himself offered you a beautiful 
                         house and a personal bomb shelter.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I absolutely refused the house and 
                         the bomb shelter.

                                     STEVE
                         But you see what I'm getting at? 
                         You get a gorgeous house, you're 
                         highly paid. What are you gonna 
                         do, stay or leave? One voice comes 
                         back at me: stay!

                                     DAVID
                         Major, that's not a good argument. 
                         If Dr. Furtw�ngler did indeed enjoy 
                         all these... these privileges, he 
                         enjoyed them because of who he is 
                         and what he is. That's true of any 
                         leading artist in any country in 
                         the world.

                                     STEVE
                         But it still doesn't make them 
                         saints. They still have to get up 
                         and piss in the middle of the night, 
                         don't they? They can still be 
                         vindictive and envious and mean 
                         just like you and me. Well, just 
                         like me. Can't they?

               No response. To Furtw�ngler:

                                     STEVE
                         Okay, Wilhelm, go home now. Go 
                         home and think about these past 
                         twelve years.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I don't understand what you mean.

                                     STEVE
                         No, that's your problem, Wilhelm. 
                         You understand nothing. We'll call 
                         you. Go!

               Furtw�ngler leaves.

                                     DAVID
                         Major.

               Steve goes to his desk and, as Furtw�ngler rises 
               uncertainly:

                                     STEVE
                         What?

                                     DAVID
                         Your manner.

                                     STEVE
                         My manner? Why don't you go 
                         downstairs, get a cup of coffee 
                         and calm down? What's the matter, 
                         Emmi? What's going on with you? 
                         What's wrong?

                                     EMMI
                         I'm sorry but I have to leave. 
                         I'll find other work. You'll have 
                         to get someone else, that's all.

                                     STEVE
                         What is this, Emmi?

                                     EMMI
                         I can't do this. It's not right.

                                     STEVE
                         What's not right?

                                     EMMI
                         I have been questioned by the 
                         Gestapo just like that. Just like 
                         you questioned him.

                                     STEVE
                         Emmi, stop! I want to show you 
                         something. Let me show you something 
                         and then if you want to leave, you 
                         can leave, please please. His 
                         friends, they did this. And he 
                         gave them birthday concerts.

                                     EMMI
                         But he had no idea, a lot of people 
                         had no idea. I only realised what 
                         was really going on when I got 
                         arrested.

                                     STEVE
                         If he had no idea, why did the 
                         Jews need saving? This is the 
                         question, Emmi, to all Germans: 
                         Why did the Jews need saving in 
                         this country? Why, if people had 
                         no idea?

                                     EMMI
                         I would like to go now, please.

               But Steve turns on the projector and the Bergen-Belsen 
               film flickers into life.

               INT. US OFFICERS' CLUB - NIGHT

               Band playing. Couples dancing. David and Steve at the bar, 
               each with a drink in front of them, lost in their own 
               thoughts. Then:

               Steve signs to the barkeeper to fill their glasses but 
               David puts a hand over his glass. Then:

                                     DAVID
                         Can I ask you a favour, Major?

                                     STEVE
                         Yeah.

                                     DAVID
                         When you question him again, could 
                         you treat him with more respect?

                                     STEVE
                         With more what? More what?

                                     DAVID
                         Major, he may just be the greatest 
                         conductor of this century and that 
                         merits respect.

                                     STEVE
                              (flaring, hissing)
                         David, I don't understand a thing 
                         about you. You're a Jew. Are you a 
                         Jew?

                                     DAVID
                         Yes, I'm a Jew. But I like to think 
                         first I'm a human being.

                                     STEVE
                         A human being, oh, good, I'm 
                         relieved, I thought you were going 
                         to say you were a music lover. 
                         This man, this great artist has 
                         made anti-Semitic remarks like you 
                         wouldn't believe. I got letters.

                                     DAVID
                         Major, show me someone who hasn't 
                         made an anti-Semitic remark and 
                         I'll show you the gates of paradise.

                                     STEVE
                              (over-reacting and 
                              overlapping)
                         What is it with you, David? Where 
                         are your feelings? Where's your 
                         hatred, your disgust? Where's your 
                         fucking outrage, David?

               He starts to go, then comes back to them.

                                     STEVE
                         Think of your parents, David, and 
                         then think of him conducting 'Happy 
                         Birthday, dear Adolf'. I mean, for 
                         Chrissake, whose side are you on? 
                         Grow up! Just grow the fuck up!

               The customers stare at him as he stalks out. The band plays.

                                                                 CUT TO:

               INT. STRAUBE APARTMENT - EVENING

               David and Emmi, sitting.

                                     DAVID
                         I want you to come back to the 
                         office. May I come in? If you are 
                         there you can influence what 
                         happens. What good can you do by 
                         leaving. If you go, you are giving 
                         up and how can you help Furtw�ngler 
                         or me? Don't think about leaving. 
                         Stay.

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - DAY

               Hot, Windows closed.  Furtw�ngler seated. David and Emmi 
               present.  Steve looks up from his notes.

                                     STEVE
                         Everybody says what a great 
                         benefactor you were to the Jews.  
                         But--
                              (holds up a sheaf 
                              of papers.)
                         I have things here you said and 
                         wrote. Listen to this: 'The Jew 
                         composer Schonberg is admired by 
                         the Jewish International.' And 
                         what about this: 'Jewish musicians 
                         lack a genuine affinity with our 
                         music.' 'Jewish musicians are good 
                         businessmen with few scruples, 
                         lacking roots.' You deny you said 
                         these things?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Those attitudes do not exist in 
                         me.

                                     STEVE
                         I believe that. But just answer 
                         the question, don't give me 
                         explanations.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Speaking to Party members I used 
                         their language, of course I did, 
                         everyone did.

                                     DAVID
                              (with some irony)
                         Major, sorry to interrupt, but 
                         maybe we have to... maybe we have 
                         to balance those things against 
                         his assistance to his Jewish 
                         colleagues.

               Steve tenses.

                                     DAVID
                         This is a transcript of the 
                         proceedings at Nuremberg.
                         A Swedish businessman, Birger 
                         Dahlerus, testified in cross-
                         examination that he had several 
                         meetings with Hermann Goering. 'I 
                         first saw Goering,' Dahlerus 
                         testified, 'embroiled in a stormy 
                         interview with Wilhelm Furtw�ngler, 
                         the famous conductor of the Berlin 
                         Philharmonic, who was vainly seeking 
                         permission to keep his Jewish 
                         concert master.

               Holds up his package of letters and dumps them on Emmi's 
               desk.

                                     DAVID
                         Emmi, pick one of these, any one, 
                         read it out loud.

               Emmi is uncertain. Steve shrugs indifferently.

               She picks an envelope and takes out the letter.

                                     EMMI
                              (reading)
                         'Please remember that Dr. 
                         Furtw�ngler risked his life to 
                         help anyone who asked him. I 
                         personally testify to having seen 
                         literally hundreds of people lined 
                         up outside his dressing room after 
                         concerts to ask for his help. He 
                         never turned anyone away. After he 
                         heard me play... I am a violinist... 
                         he gave me money because I was 
                         unable to feed myself or my family 
                         and then he helped me to escape to 
                         Sweden. He helped countless people 
                         in similar ways.'

                                     DAVID
                         And this, only one of these letters, 
                         Major. I have lots of them.

                                     STEVE
                              (smiling)
                         How many times have I got to tell 
                         you I was in insurance? You think 
                         I can't smell a phoney policy when 
                         it's shoved under my nose? Sure, 
                         he helped Jews, but that was just 
                         insurance, his cover, because all 
                         the while he was maestro of all he 
                         surveyed,
                              (turning on 
                              Furtw�ngler)
                         See, Wilhelm, I think you're their 
                         boy, their creature. You were like 
                         an advertising slogan for them: 
                         this is what we produce, the 
                         greatest conductor in the world. 
                         And you went along with it. The 
                         truth of the matter is, Wilhelm, 
                         you didn't need to be a member of 
                         the Party. I made a mistake when I 
                         asked you for your Party number. I 
                         should've asked you for your non-
                         Party number. Just like some other 
                         well-known artists.
                              (suddenly, to Emmi)
                         Emmi, put that record on.

               Emmi puts on the record of the Adagio from Bruckner's 
               Seventh Symphony. After a moment:

                                     STEVE
                         Do you know what that is?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Of course I know what that is.

                                     STEVE
                         Okay, so what is it?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Bruckner's Seventh. The Adagio.

                                     STEVE
                         Who's conducting?

                                     FURTWANGLBR
                         I am.

                                     STEVE
                         You know the last time it was played 
                         on these air waves?

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         How can I know such a thing?

                                     STEVE
                         I'll tell you, then. The last time 
                         this music was played on these air 
                         waves was after they announced 
                         that your pal Hitler had shot 
                         himself. Listen to it.  They listen.  
                         Did they pick little K's recording? 
                         Did they pick some other conductor? 
                         No, they picked you, and why? 
                         Because you represented them so 
                         beautifully. When the Devil died, 
                         they wanted his bandleader to 
                         conduct the funeral march. You 
                         were everything to them.

               The music plays.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                              (near to breakdown 
                              but struggling for 
                              control)
                         I have always tried to analyse 
                         myself carefully and closely. In 
                         staying here, I believed I walked 
                         a tightrope between exile and the 
                         gallows. You seem to be blaming me 
                         for not having allowed myself to 
                         be hanged.

               David takes the record off.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I didn't directly oppose the Party 
                         because I told myself, that was 
                         not my job. If I had taken any 
                         active part in politics I could 
                         not have remained here. But as a 
                         musician, I am more than a citizen. 
                         I am a citizen of this country in 
                         that eternal sense to which the 
                         genius of great music testifies. I 
                         know that a single performance of 
                         a great masterpiece was a stronger 
                         and more vital negation of the 
                         spirit of Buchenwald and Auschwitz 
                         than words.

               An uncontrollable surge of anger wells up in Steve, causing 
               him to pace alarmingly. He grabs the baton from his desk, 
               stands trembling before Furtw�ngler, and snaps it in half.  

               He pushes his face close to Furtw�ngler, who recoils, 
               terrified. David half-stands, ready to intervene physically. 
               During this Emmi puts her fingers in her ears.

                                     STEVE
                              (quiet, terrifying)
                         Have you ever smelled burning flesh? 
                         I smelt it four miles away. Four 
                         miles away, I smelt it. Have you 
                         ever seen the gas chambers, the 
                         crematoria? Have you seen the mounds 
                         of rotting corpses? You talk to me 
                         about culture, art and music? You 
                         putting that in the scales, Wilhelm? 
                         You setting culture, art and music 
                         against the millions put to death 
                         by your pals? They had orchestras 
                         in the camps. They played Beethoven, 
                         Wagner. The hangmen were playing 
                         chamber music at home with their 
                         families. I don't understand the 
                         Germans' relationship with music. 
                         What do you need music for? Your 
                         pals you could call to save a few 
                         Jews when millions of them were 
                         being annihilated? Yes, I blame 
                         you for not getting hanged, I blame 
                         you for your cowardice. You strutted 
                         and swaggered, you fucking piece 
                         of shit, king-pin in a shithouse. 
                         You talk to me about walking a 
                         tightrope between exile and the 
                         gallows, and I say to you, lies!

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                              (breaking down)
                         I love my country, I believe in 
                         music, what was I to do?

                                     STEVE
                         Look around you. See the country 
                         you served. Look at people who had 
                         real courage, who took risks, who 
                         risked their lives. Like Emmi's 
                         father.

               He sees Emmi has her fingers in her ears, yells at her.

                                     STEVE
                         Emmi, take your fingers out of 
                         your ears!

               She does so.

                                     STEVE
                         I'm talking about your father.

               She screams. Stillness. All eyes on her.

                                     EMMI
                         My father only joined the plot 
                         when he realised that we could not 
                         win the war.  She cries quietly.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                              (desperate)
                         What kind of a world do you want, 
                         Major? What kind of world are you 
                         going to make? Do you honestly 
                         believe that the only reality is 
                         the material world, so you will be 
                         left nothing, nothing but 
                         feculence... more foul-smelling 
                         than that which pervades your 
                         nights...
                              (near to breakdown)
                         How was I to understand, how was I 
                         to know what they were capable of? 
                         No one knew. No one knew.

               He breaks down, buries his face in his hands, weeps.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         I don't want to stay in this 
                         country. Yes, I should have left 
                         in 1934, it would have been better 
                         if I'd left...

               He is suddenly overtaken by nausea and faintness, stands, 
               a hand to his mouth. Emmi goes to him.

                                     STEVE
                         Get him out of here.

               Emmi helps Furtw�ngler out. Steve strides to the window, 
               opens it, puts his head out into the fresh air.

               INT. WAITING ROOM - DAY

               Emmi helps Furtw�ngler to a chair. She watches him 
               solicitously. He breathes deeply.

                                     FURTW�NGLER
                         Thank you, Fraulein. You have been 
                         most kind.
                              (he rises.)
                         He smiles at her. She is 
                         embarrassed.

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - DAY

               Steve is trying to get a number on the telephone. David is 
               packing up his papers.

               David turns to the records, starts to son through until he 
               finds what he's looking for. He removes the Bruckner and 
               puts another record on the turntable.

                                     STEVE
                              (into the telephone)
                         Major Arnold. Get me General 
                         Wallace. General? Major Arnold, 
                         about Furtw�ngler. I don't know if 
                         we've got a case that'll stand up, 
                         but sure as hell we can give him a 
                         hard time.

               At full volume the sound of the subdued opening of 
               Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.

                                     STEVE
                              (to David)
                         Hey, turn that down, would you? 
                         Can't you see I'm on the phone?
                              (into the telephone)
                         Never mind, we got a journalist 
                         who'll do whatever we tell him.

               But David ignores him, sits, implacable, listening.

               INT. STEVE'S BUILDING - DAY

               Furtw�ngler walks slowly down the stairs, a broken man 
               struggling to regain his composure. Emmi watches him.

               INT. STEVE'S OFFICE - DAY

               The music at full blast. David, at an open window, keeps 
               his back to Steve, still on the telephone.

                                     STEVE
                         Turn it off!

               EXT.  STEVE S BUILDING - DAY

               Furtw�ngler, on the stairs, stops, hearing the music echoing 
               through the building.

               Furtw�ngler left hand begins to tremble, but it is only 
               his way of sensing the tempo.  

               Furtw�ngler slowly continues down the stairs.

                                     STEVE'S VOICE
                         We handed Wilhelm Furtw�ngler over 
                         to the civil authorities and he 
                         was charged with serving the Nazi 
                         regime, with uttering anti-Semitic 
                         slurs, performing at an official 
                         Nazi Party function and with being 
                         a Prussian Privy Councillor.  Dr. 
                         Furtw�ngler was acquitted. I didn't 
                         nail him. But I sure winged him. 
                         And I know I did the right thing. 
                         Furtw�ngler resumed his career but 
                         he was never allowed to conduct in 
                         the United States. He died in 1954. 
                         Little K succeeded him as head of 
                         the Berlin Philharmonic.

               INT.  CONCERT HALL (ARCHIVE)

               Furtw�ngler conducting. Goebbels and other high-ranking 
               Nazis in the audience. When the music finishes, Furtw�ngler 
               turns and bows. Goebbels rises and shakes hands with him.  
               Furtw�ngler takes his handkerchief and wipes his hands. 
               The film replays this gesture several times - Furtw�ngler 
               wiping his hands.

                                                               FADE OUT:

               THE END